Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Free Security Products for All U.S. Public Schools

CONCERNED PARENTS READ AND SHARE THIS PARENTS LETS MAKE A DIFFERENCE TODAY

With the continued problems that SCHOOL SHOOTERS bring to our public schools, everyone in the country is looking for a solution to the problem. Some recommended solutions are "better background checks" for weapons purchases, "nationwide mental health legislation", "armed school teachers", "retired police officers on campus" etc. Now although together maybe these solutions will make a difference, however none of these will "STOP A BULLET ONCE FIRED".

Finally there is a solution that NO ONE in America is doing or can do on the scale of a company that has figured out a way to DONATE school security products to each and every public school system in the nation FREE OF CHARGE and NO STRINGS ATTACHED.

As an outside threat assessment specialist for this program, I am pleased to announce that the program is ready for NATIONAL launch. PARENTS follow this link to the website http://blu-moonsecurity.com/ and go to the products page to see what this company has to offer. The company will donate bullet resistant doors, security door shields and RFID remote locks FREE OF COSTS to any school that requests them. Schools can order ANY AMOUNT of these products at no charge, and it doesn't matter if your school has 1 or 1000 doors.

Parents please press your public school systems to take advantage of this program today, I am already pressing my school system on this and will meet with my local school board superintendents this week. If you know me personally and have my number please call me to get more information.

*** OTHERWISE REPOST, REPEAT AND SHARE THIS NATIONWIDE ***

You can also go to my website to receive any additional contact information.
www.rypulassessments.com

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Fort Lauderdale teachers, workers train against shooters - Sun Sentinel

Fort Lauderdale teachers, workers train against shooters - Sun Sentinel

Police find weapons, 'credible' threat linked to Marcellus middle school student | syracuse.com

The threat of school shootings are a phenomenon that simple will not be wished away, I am certain that there is a very large segment of our society that feels the school shooter scenario is a "NIMBY" situation and that only "those" people have to deal with shootings on a campus.  I urge parents, school administrators, police departments and students to realize that these incidents are here to stay.  As evidenced in the report below, read on.



Police find weapons, 'credible' threat linked to Marcellus middle school student | syracuse.com



Marcellus, NY - The Marcellus Village Police removed an unspecified number of weapons from a middle school student's home after classmates overheard two students discussing violent movies and past school shootings.



It was also disclosed that one of the two students discussing violence indicated a desire to do harm to a couple of classmates, Marcellus authorities said.  Marcellus Central School District Superintendent Craig J. Tice and village Police Chief Robert Wicks detailed the week's events leading up to the removal of the weapons in a letter mailed Friday to parents.  The two will hold a press conference at the Marcellus Village police offices at 3:30 p.m. to discuss the situation.  "It has been determined by law enforcement that the incident has been thoroughly investigated, that the threat has been eliminated and access to weapons has been removed, and that no students are in any danger," Tice said in a press release.



The superintendent and police chief both said they are confident the immediate threat has been extinguished.

On Monday, classmates overheard two C.S. Driver Middle School students having a disturbing conversation about violent movies and past school shootings. The two students have not been identified because of their age.  That evening, one of the classmates reported what they had overheard to a parent, who contacted school officials Tuesday morning.  The district's three school resource officers - Matt Hayes, John Scanlon and Earl Smith - along with middle school administrators, immediately interviewed the witness and the two suspects. They determined the presence of a credible threat.  The district alerted village police and sheriff's deputies, who then conducted a search of the students' homes. In one of the homes, deputies found and removed a number of weapons.



On Wednesday, it was also disclosed that one of the two students indicated a desire to harm a couple of classmates.  Thursday, administrators spoke with faculty and staff. The community and parents were notified today.  Student privacy laws prohibit district officials from commenting on any specific action taken, a press release from the district said.  "The situation has been brought to a successful conclusion," Wicks said. "School district officials and local law enforcement have collaborated in a manner - especially thanks to the work of the school resource officers - that ensured that this situation received the utmost attention and priority and that the school district has taken appropriate action."



Tice and Wicks offered their thanks and admiration to the student who opted not to be simply a bystander.

"This incident proves that our first line of defense is the students themselves," Tice said. "This young witness demonstrated good judgment and great courage by stepping forward."

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

AECOM planning to expand it's presence in Africa

AECOM planning to expand it's presence in Africa

International Defense Companies Target African Security Markets as Military Spending in Africa exceed $20 billion

International Defense Companies Target African Security Markets as Military Spending in Africa exceed $20 billion

Erik Prince Founder of Blackwater (Academi) Forms New Company in Africa

Erik Prince Founder of Blackwater (Academi) Forms New Company in Africa

By the Time Armed Thug Saw Quick-Thinking Homeowner Crouching and Holding an AR-15, It Was Too Late | Video | TheBlaze.com

By the Time Armed Thug Saw Quick-Thinking Homeowner Crouching and Holding an AR-15, It Was Too Late | Video | TheBlaze.com

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Atlanta School Shooting: 3 Shot Near Therrell High School | EURweb

Atlanta School Shooting: 3 Shot Near Therrell High School | EURweb

Purdue researchers find ways to better protect students in school shootings

Purdue researchers find ways to better protect students in school shootings | Fox 59 News – fox59.com

Shootings near Frandor, Coolidge Road causing Michigan State, East Lansing schools lockdowns | MLive.com

Shootings near Frandor, Coolidge Road causing Michigan State, East Lansing schools lockdowns | MLive.com

No Charges in Sparks Middle School Shooting

No Charges in Sparks Middle School Shooting

5 shot near high school in Atlanta

ATLANTA (AP) — Police say five people were shot near a high school in Atlanta. Officials say all five are believed to be students.
Atlanta Police Sgt. Greg Lyon says the five were shot near Therrell High School on Tuesday afternoon. He says their injuries don't appear to be life-threatening. Police have said the shooting didn't happen on school property.
Atlanta Public Schools spokeswoman Kimberly Willis Green says the victims are believed to be students. It wasn't immediately clear if the shooter was also a student.  Police spokesman John Chafee says authorities are speaking with a possible suspect but an arrest hasn't been made. Green says the school was locked down as a precaution, and all after-school activities were canceled. Further details were not immediately available.

Monday, May 12, 2014

Japan makes first arrest over 3D printer guns: reports | Army & Land Forces News at DefenceTalk

Japan makes first arrest over 3D printer guns: reports | Army & Land Forces News at DefenceTalk

Ukraine Travel Warning

Ukraine Travel Warning

Some products you cannot destroy...


FBI — Officers and Child-Sex Offenders

FBI — Officers and Child-Sex Offenders

Addressing the Problem of the Active Shooter

By:
Special Agent Schweit serves as a special assistant to the executive assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch and is a member of the working group implementing Now Is the Time, a White House initiative to protect communities by reducing gun violence.
Unfortunately, scenes involving active shooters have become too familiar. Radio transmissions of possible shots fired send the closest police officers to the scene. In today’s world, such calls carry with them the memories of school, business, and theater shootings.
Responding officers must recognize that in more than half of mass-shooting incidents where a solo officer arrived on the scene —57 percent— shooting still will be underway, with 75 percent requiring law enforcement personnel to confront the perpetrator before the threat ends.1 And, one-third of those officers will be shot as they engage.2
Critical Need
That number disturbs FBI Section Chief (SC) Christopher Combs, Strategic Information and Operations Center, the FBI’s central command post for all major incidents. He also leads a bureau team assigned by the White House to find ways to support state, local, tribal, and campus law enforcement officers who may face an active-shooter situation. The team’s efforts comprise part of a larger initiative, Now Is the Time, begun by the White House after the mass killing of young children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.3 
First responders face the threat of force as part of their daily jobs. Although tactical teams, such as SWAT, train for barricade situations and multiple-member entries, active-shooter training focuses on five-person-or-less building entries. Responding officers may not previously have trained to face this unique type of threat. According to SC Combs, “We’ve been asked to do our part to help law enforcement better prepare for the next Newtown. With so many officers engaged in shootings, it’s important we do whatever we can to help try to change that and make them safer.”
Active-Shooter Statistics

  • Active-shooter incidents often occur in small- and medium-sized communities where police departments are limited by budget constraints and small workforces.10
  • The average active-shooter incident lasts 12 minutes. Thirty-seven percent last less than 5 minutes.11
  • Overwhelmingly, the offender is a single shooter (98 percent), primarily male (97 percent). In 40 percent of the instances, they kill themselves.12
  • Two percent of the shooters bring IEDs as an additional weapon.13 
  • In 10 percent of the cases, the shooter stops and walks away. In 20 percent of the cases, the shooter goes mobile, moving to another location.14
  • Forty-three percent of the time, the crime is over before police arrive. In 57 percent of the shootings, an officer arrives while the shooting is still underway.15
  • The shooter often stops as soon as he hears or sees law enforcement, sometimes turning his anger or aggression on law enforcement.16
  • Patrol officers are most likely responding alone or with a partner. When responding alone, 75 percent had to take action.17
  • A third of those officers who enter the incident alone are shot by the intruder.18

Important Training
The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) partially has funded—through its VALOR initiative—the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training (ALERRT) course, an active-shooter training program.4 Born from concerns that arose from shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, ALERRT better prepares the first officers on the scene of an active-shooter situation. The training was developed by the San Marcos, Texas, Police Department and the Hays County, Texas, Sheriff’s Department and adopted by Texas State University, San Marcos.
In the aftermath of the tragedy in Sandy Hook, Connecticut, the FBI offered to partner with BJA in the delivery of this crucial training and sent its tactical instructors (TIs) to attend and assess the ALERRT course. The TI program is managed by the Training Division at Quantico, Virginia. As word of training has spread, news of the learning opportunities went national. Since its inception in 2002, ALERRT has trained more than 40,000 law enforcement officers as a result of more than $26 million in funding.
The 16-hour Basic Active-Shooter Course, one of several courses offered, prepares first responders to isolate, distract, and end the threat when an active shooter is engaged. The course covers shooting and moving, conducting threshold evaluations, employing concepts and principles of team movement, using setup and room entry techniques, approaching and breaching the crisis site, practicing rescue-team tactics, handling improvised explosive devices, and recognizing postengagement priorities of work. Training teams carry training-ammunition kits, allowing up to 30 students to engage in tactical force-on-force scenarios carried out in unoccupied schools or office buildings.
Virtually every state has officers trained through the ALERRT program, and many have made the training mandatory for active-shooter responders, the first among them Mississippi, Alabama, Iowa, Louisiana, and South Carolina. Since the Sandy Hook tragedy, more police departments have requested training.

Workplace Violence cover.jpgCampus Attacks cover.jpg
Workplace and Campus Violence 
 
The FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU) published a monograph on workplace violence in 2002 that examined the preattack warning behaviors of attackers who targeted places of employment. It remains one of the most useful and comprehensive guides for the evaluation of persons of concern in the workplace. The monograph is available at http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/workplace-violence.
The BAU started Phase I of the Campus Attacks project in 2007, partnering with the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Secret Service. The Campus Attacks project examined attempted and committed homicidal acts of violence (excluding gang or profit motivated crimes) on American college campuses from 1900 to 2008. The project identified 272 such incidents. The BAU currently is working with the U.S. Department of Education on Phase II of this project, focusing exclusively on grievance-based attacks that occurred from 1985 to 2010. This report is planned to be published in 2014, focusing on preattack behaviors of college campus active shooters. The Campus Attacks report from April 2010 is available at http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/campus-attacks.
Experts in the FBI’s BAU are available to conduct threat assessment and develop threat mitigation strategies for persons of concern. Each FBI field office has a BAU representative to the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crimes (NCAVC). To seek their assistance, contact your local FBI field office. Contact information for your local FBI field office is located at http://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field.

National Standard, National Training
Aware of the increased demand, the FBI agreed to supplement BJA’s effort and integrated ALERRT into the White House initiative, reasoning the training could provide added support for law enforcement officers most at risk—those first on the scene. A private study of 35 active-shooter incidents during 2012 found that 37 percent of the attacks ended in less than 5 minutes, 63 percent in less than 15 minutes.5  Minutes into the Sikh temple shooting in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, the perpetrator turned away from other victims to engage the first officer  on the scene and shot him 15 times. Fortunately, the officer survived.6
To assist in this project, SC Combs and his team turned to the Tactical Instructors (TIs) in the Law Enforcement Training for Safety and Survival (LETSS) program, which was developed in 1992.  LETSS, a program of the Practical Applications Unit in the FBI’s Training Division, strives to provide officers with the skills and mind-set required to identify and handle critical situations in high-risk environments.
LETSS experts recognized the need for coordinated and standardized nationwide active-shooter training and through the FBI/BJA partnership began working directly with ALERRT personnel to study how best to resolve these situations. TIs traveled to the ALERRT center in Texas to observe protocols and ask questions. After working with ALERRT personnel to adjust the course by providing updates and ensuring compliance with current rules and regulations, the FBI adopted the modified course as a national standard.
Since February, 100 FBI TIs have attended the 5-day ALERRT Train-the-Trainer school in San Marcos, Texas. The FBI recognizes that it best serves in a support role as a training partner with BJA. These certified TIs, along with ALERRT instructors, now jointly will be able to provide the 16-hour training at no cost to agencies across the nation. Although funding remains a challenge as federal budget cuts continue, a strong commitment exists to continue to support active-shooter training.
Statistics show that 98 percent of active-shooter incidents involve state and local crimes, primarily occurring in areas with small- and medium-sized law enforcement agencies.8 Ninety-eight percent of these crimes are carried out by a single shooter, usually male (97 percent).9

For Additional Information
Frederick Calhoun and Stephen Weston, Contemporary Threat Management: A Practical Guide for Identifying, Assessing, and Managing Individuals of Violent Intent (San Diego, CA: Specialized Training Services, 2003).
Gene Deisinger, Marisa Randazzo, Daniel O’Neill, and Jenna Savage, The Handbook for Campus Threat Assessment and Management Teams (Stoneham, MA: Applied Risk Management, 2008).
Robert Fein, Bryan Vossekuil, and Gwen Holden, Threat Assessment: An Approach to Prevent Targeted Violence (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, 1995).
John Monahan, Henry Steadman, Eric Silver, Paul Appelbaum, Pamela Robbins, Edward Mulvey, Loren Roth, Thomas Grisso, and Steven Banks, Rethinking Risk Assessment: The MacArthur Study of Mental Disorder and Violence (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2001).
Bryan Vossekuil, Robert Fein, Marisa Reddy, Randy Borum, and William Modzeleski, The Final Report and Findings of the Safe School Initiative: Implications for the Prevention of School Attacks in the United States (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Secret Service, 2002).

Important Directive
On January 14, 2013, President Barack Obama signed the Investigative Assistance for Violent Crimes Act of 2012 into law. The act permits the attorney general, upon the request of an appropriate state or local law enforcement officer, to provide assistance in the investigation of 1) violent acts and shootings occurring in a “place of public use” and 2) mass killings—defined as three or more killings in a single incident—and attempted mass killings. Under the act, federal officials assisting the investigation of these incidents are presumed to be acting within the scope of their employment.
The FBI’s efforts include three areas of support. First, before an incident occurs, agencies can obtain no-cost, active-shooter training close to home by submitting a request via the ALERRT website,http://www.alerrt.org. The site provides general information, requirements for hosting a school in a particular area, and registration materials. Department officials also can call the special agent in charge of their local FBI field office for further registration assistance.
Second, experts in the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU) are available to conduct threat assessments and develop threat mitigation strategies for persons of concern.  BAU is part of the FBI’s Critical Incident Response Group, home to the FBI’s most sophisticated tactical assets. Each FBI field office has a BAU representative to the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crimes (NCAVC). The NCAVC focuses its efforts not on how to respond tactically to an active-shooter situation, but, rather, how to prevent one. These experts can work as part of a team to prevent a situation from escalating by identifying, assessing, and managing the threat. 
Third, all FBI field offices are hosting a series of two-day crisis management conferences during 2013 to engage with their state, local, tribal, and campus law enforcement partners and share lessons learned and best practices. The conferences afford attendees an opportunity to share and hear details gleaned from the many after-action reviews the FBI has participated in and observed with involved law enforcement agencies. These provide a plethora of details on how best to deal with unique and complex aspects of these situations, as well as FBI resources available to assist in incident response, management, and resolution.
Conference topics include pre-event and behavioral indicators, evidence collection, complex crime-scene management, strategies to deal with the national news media, procedures for handling IEDs, and methods of providing victim assistance to families and first responders.
Conferences are followed by a newly developed four-hour tabletop exercise for law enforcement agencies and other first responders based on facts relating to the recent school shootings. A second tabletop rolling out in May was specifically designed for college campus incidents. These are designed around the latest lessons learned and best management practices, which will include participation by law enforcement, first responders, fire departments, and other emergency/public safety agencies.

Key Considerations of the Active Shooter
1) There is no one demographic profile of an active shooter.
2) Many active shooters display observable preattack behaviors, which, if recognized, can lead to the disruption of the planned attack.
3) The pathway to targeted violence typically involves an unresolved real or perceived grievance and an ideation of a violent resolution that eventually moves from thought to research, planning, and preparation.
4) A thorough threat assessment typically necessitates a holistic review of an individual of concern, including historical, clinical, and contextual factors.
5) Human bystanders generally represent the greatest opportunity for the detection and recognition of an active shooter prior to his or her attack.
6) Concerning active shooters, a person who makes a threat is rarely the same as the person who poses a threat.
7) Successful threat management of a person of concern often involves long-term caretaking and coordination between law enforcement, mental health care, and social services.
 
8) Exclusionary interventions (e.g., expulsion, termination) do not necessarily represent the end of threat-management efforts.
9) While not every active shooter can be identified and thwarted prior to attacking, many potential active shooters who appear to be on a trajectory toward violence can be stopped.
10) The FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit is available to assist state and local agencies in the assessment and management of threatening persons and communications.
Note: Members of the FBI’s BAU-2 and the contributors listed in the box “For Additional Information” provided the basis for these key considerations.

Conclusion
Agencies interested in active-shooter training, conferences, tabletop exercises, or threat-analysis assistance should contact their local FBI office. Doing so may help counter the threat posed by the active shooter. These important educational opportunities may help save civilian lives, as well as the first responders who come to their aid.
Endnotes
1 Author follow-on analysis of data from J. Pete Blair and M. Hunter Martaindale, “United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications” (San Marcos, TX: Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training, Texas State University, 2010),http://alerrt.org/files/research/ActiveShooterEvents.pdf (accessed May 17, 2013). 
2 Ibid.
3 White House, “Now is the Time; the President’s plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence,” http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/preventing-gun-violence (accessed April 25, 2013).
4 VALOR is a U.S. attorney general initiative that addresses the increase in assaults and violence against law enforcement. For additional information, see http://www.valorforblue.org/Home.
5 John Nicoletti, “Detection and Disruption of Insider/Outsider Perpetrated Violence” (lecture, Colorado Emergency Preparedness Partnership, December 2012).
6 Oak Creek Police Department, “After-Action Report, Sikh Temple Shooting, Oak Creek, Wisconsin, August 5, 2012”; Colleen Curry, Michael James, Richard Esposito, and Jack Date, “7 Dead at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin: Officials Believe ‘White Supremacist’ Behind ‘Domestic Terrorism,’” ABC News, http://abcnews.go.com/US/sikh-temple-oak-creek-wisconsin-officials-white-supremacist/story?id=16933779#.UXk4xkqyDGo (accessed April 25, 2013). 
7 Federal Bureau of Investigation, “Survival Skills,” For additional information, seehttp://www.fbi.gov/about-us/training/letts (accessed April 25, 2013).
8 New York City Police Department, “Active Shooter: Recommendations and Analysis for Risk Mitigation,”http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/downloads/pdf/counterterrorism/ActiveShooter.pdf
(accessed April 24, 2013).
9 Ibid.
10 Ibid.
11 John Nicoletti, “Detection and Disruption of Insider/Outsider Perpetrated Violence.”
12 New York City Police Department, “Active Shooter.”
13 Blair and Martaindale, “United States Active Shooter Events.”
14 Ibid.
15 Ibid.
16 Oak Creek Police Department; Lieutenant Paul Vance.
17 Blair and Martaindale, “United States Active Shooter Events.”
18 Ibid.

Active Shooter Statistics

There have been a number of academic studies done on active shooting incidents. Here are some statistics from two of those studies.
John Nicolette, PhD, conducted a study of 35 active shooter incidents during 2012 and discussed the results of his study during a lecture entitled “Detection and Disruption of Insider/Outsider Perpetrated Violence.”
  • The average active shooter incident lasts 12 minutes, while 37 percent last less than five minutes.
  • 49 percent of attackers committed suicide, 34 percent were arrested, and 17 percent were killed.
  • 51 percent of the attacks studied occurred in the workplace, while 17 percent occurred in a school, 17 percent occurred in a public place, and six percent occurred in a religious establishment.

Peter Blair, PhD, and Hunter Martindale, PhD,
 conducted a study of 84 active shooter incidents from 2001 to 2010. Here’s a summary of their findings:
  • Two percent of the shooters bring improvised explosive devices (IEDs) as an additional weapon.
  • In 10 percent of the cases, the shooter stops and walks away. In 20 percent of the cases, the shooter goes mobile, moving to another location.
  • 43 percent of the time, the crime is over before police arrive. In 57 percent of the shootings, an officer arrives while shooting is still underway.
  • The attacks ended before the police arrived 49 percent of the time. In 56 percent of the attacks ongoing when police arrived, officers had to use force to stop the killing.

The Victim Operated Improvised Explosives Device (VOIED)

The Victim Operated Improvised Explosives Device (VOIED)

My Top 3 Armored Vehicles

My Top 3 Armored Vehicles



On the Security Driver and Training Facebook Group I posted an article that appeared in a magazine titled “The 3 Best armored cars” I commented “This is what happens when a Journalist writes about armored cars?, and mentioned that I don’t agree with the writer. The article
http://www.thegentlemansjournal.com/cars-3-of-the-best-armored-cars/
One of the Group members asked “what would be my version of the top three vehicles – good question. Before answering the question a simple review;
You are in an armored vehicle because bad people want to do bad things to you.  So with that said keep in mind that the basic purpose of an armored vehicle is to absorb the initial burst of fire and maintain the capability to drive out of the ambush. There is other criteria such as longevity, threat level, the environment they are moving through. All together they could be the subject of a book (that was blatant self-promotion – I have a book coming out shortly with armored vehicles as chapter).
So all that to say, that, in my opinion there is no top three – The best way to pick vehicles is to select the best vehicle for the intended mission. These are my opinions
For high risk environments an Armored Suburban is my choice. They have a huge payload capacity which means they can accept high levels of armor. We (VDI) use armored Suburban’s in the Armored SUV program. Before we ran the armored Suburban’s through the program we thought it would be a good idea to find out there limits. (If you don’t know what the vehicle can do how do you know what the driver can do?). With a fairly sophisticated computer installed in the vehicle Joe, Larry and I played with tested the armored Suburban, and walked away impressed at what it can do, especially in the “Oh my God I’m going to die mode. So if I had to pick one nonmilitary vehicle to driving in a hostile environment it would be an armored suburban. Also from our Executive Vehicle survey the number one armored vehicle used by all groups was the Suburban.
My next car would be the factory built Mercedes S Class Guard Car. I am a bit prejudice; years back I was a consultant to Mercedes. As a consultant I had the opportunity to visit the manufacturing facility, test them, and conduct many product demonstrations with them, and in my opinion they are an incredible feat of engineering. The Mercedes- like other OEM’s are built from the ground up to be armored cars. It’s not a modified suspension – transmission – frame etc. it’s all designed from the onset to be used with the additional weight that comes with armor. Again from our Executive Vehicle survey the number one armored non SUV vehicle used by all was the Mercedes.
The 3rd vehicle is not a vehicle; it is the process of armoring small light weight vehicles.  In some environments armoring small vehicles is a necessity. In particular Mexico where blending in is important. This is an article I did a few years back that explains the process,
http://securitydriver.com/04/armoring-small-vehicles/

He’s Got Your Back: How a Protection Specialist Keeps Clients Safe

He’s Got Your Back: How a Protection Specialist Keeps Clients Safe

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Building Resilience to Violent Extremism Among Somali-Americans in Minneapolis-St. Paul | START.umd.edu

Building Resilience to Violent Extremism Among Somali-Americans in Minneapolis-St. Paul | START.umd.edu

Discussion Point: The State of Al-Qaida, its Affiliates and Associated Groups | START.umd.edu

Discussion Point: The State of Al-Qaida, its Affiliates and Associated Groups | START.umd.edu

https://www.start.umd.edu/pubs/START_USAttitudes_ReportingTerrorismRelatedActivity.pdf

https://www.start.umd.edu/pubs/START_USAttitudes_ReportingTerrorismRelatedActivity.pdf

Preacher accused of 59 counts of molesting girls in Minnesota

(CNN) -- Authorities nationwide are searching for a Minnesota minister accused of 59 felony counts of criminal sexual conduct with two young girls while they were members of his church.
Victor Barnard, 52, was last seen in Spokane, Washington, according to a written statement from the Washington State Patrol.

On April 11, prosecutors in Pine County, Minnesota, issued a criminal complaint after a two-year investigation into allegations from two women about Barnard's alleged conduct while he was preaching to a religious group in Finlayson, Minnesota.  Lindsay Tornambe is one of the two women, who are referred to as "B" and "C" in the complaint. Now 27, she lives in Bethesda, Maryland. She wants Barnard to go to prison.
"I definitely don't want him hurting anyone else and ruining other people's lives like mine was," she told CNN.
The complaint says Tornambe alleges that she was sexually abused by Barnard from the ages of 13 to 22 while she and her parents were members of the River Road Fellowship. Tornambe told investigators that Barnard created a group of 10 young girls and women who were known as Alamoths, or maidens. Her group was sent to what she thought was a summer camp, the document says.  Tornambe alleges that Barnard first molested her after he preached to her that he represented Jesus Christ in the flesh. She told investigators that she estimated that Barnard sexually assaulted her one to three times a month until she left in 2010 to be with her parents, who had moved to Pennsylvania.

In fall 2011, she was contacted by another former maiden who shared a similar story; she said she was molested by Barnard from the time she was 12 until she was 20, although she said the number of sexual acts varied each month. Tornambe and the other woman went to the police in Minnesota. Barnard had moved to Washington state after an admission to affairs with married women caused the religious group to split, the complaint says. Both women said Barnard sometimes became upset with them and was violent. They also said their parents were called to a meeting -- after Barnard allegedly had begun to rape them -- in which he told the parents he might have sex with them. Tornambe's father told investigators that he knew what Barnard was telling them was wrong, but there was pressure to not be exiled from the church and "lose everything he had." The ministry operated in a secluded area of Pine County from about 2000 until 2011 or 2012, said Chief Deputy Steven Blackwell of the county sheriff's office. The fellowship vacated the property shortly after a new sheriff was elected and began investigating the ministry, Blackwell said. The Salvation

Army now runs a family camp there, he said. In the complaint, an investigating officer with the Washington State Patrol said he spoke with an elder in the church who had two daughters who were maidens. That elder denied that a group had ever been separated from their parents. CNN attempted to reach the man Wednesday night, as well as a man described in the complaint as Barnard's right-hand man, but was unsuccessful. Lt. Shane Nelson, a criminal investigations officer for the Washington State Patrol, said officers were unable to find Barnard, and it was possible he had fled the area. There are no charges against Barnard in Washington, Nelson said. Dan Coon, a spokesman for Washington State Police, added Thursday that a detective is working with the Pine County Sheriff's Office in their search for Barnard.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev's lawyers ask court to strike hospital statements - CNN.com

Dzhokar Tsarnaev's lawyers ask court to strike hospital statements - CNN.com

More Americans killed in gun deaths than in Terrorist Attacks

It has now been more than one year since the grieving families of Newtown, Connecticut put their children on the school bus, only to have them never return.
Teachers, of course, were victims too - but all of the lives lost in that American school massacre are just a small fraction of the total number of gun deaths in the United States. In fact, the number of Americans killed in guns deaths is far larger than the number of those killed in terrorist attacks around the world every year. In 2010, 13,186 people died in terrorist attacks worldwide; in that same year, in America alone, 31,672 people lost their lives in gun-related deaths, according to numbers complied by Tom Diaz – until recently, a senior analyst at the Violence Policy Center. 
While the United States government has invested more than half a trillion dollars on homeland security since the September 11,, 2001 attacks, according to the Congressional Budget Office, there has been practically no effort to deter gun violence. “I think it stems from the fact that most Americans of good will simply do not know how many of their fellow [citizens] are killed every day and every week by guns in America,” Diaz told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour in an interview Tuesday. Diaz was a gun enthusiast and a member of the NRA, who changed his position after he interviewed gun victims and their families while working on gun legislation as a Congressional staffer. He now is now a proponent for gun safety laws. Government research on gun related deaths has diminished over the years and become more difficult to access, which Diaz claimed has been deliberately engineered by the gun lobby. “[The NRA and the gun industry] tried to eliminate the unit in the Centers for Disease Control that did this research and then what they really did is just cut their funding out.” Diaz also said those pro-gun groups have stopped the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms from revealing data to the public.
Despite the gun lobby’s efforts, the majority of Americans support some type of gun control, according to the latest Pew Research Center poll. 82% favor background checks, 55% favor a ban on assault-style weapons, and 54% favor a ban on high-capacity ammunition clips. Diaz believes there is virtually no chance the NRA will propose or favor some type of solution that limits access to guns or ammunition. “Wayne LaPierre, who is the executive director, has said there are no shades of grey in this debate. ‘You are either with us or against.’ And the NRA’s consistent position – long standing for at least two decade – has been, ‘We will not compromise on any gun control legislation.’”

Worldwide Caution

Worldwide Caution

Violent hate crimes offer insights into lone-actor terrorism

Jessica Rivinius

Understanding the patterns of violent hate crimes may help law enforcement officers better understand lone-actor terrorism. When compared to group-based terrorism incidents, violent hate crimes are more predictive of when and where lone-actor terrorist attacks occurred, according to new research from the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START).

In the United States between 1992 and 2010, locations where the 101 lone-actor terrorism incidents occurred shared more demographic similarities with the locations of the 46,000 violent hate crimes than with the locations of 424 group-based terrorist attacks over the time period.

Similar to group-based terrorism and violent hate crimes, lone-actor terrorism is more likely to occur in counties with larger populations, lower levels of home ownership, and higher percentages of non-Hispanic whites. START_IUSSD_UnderstandingLoneactorTerrorism_Sept2013_cover

“We think this is likely for two reasons: one, home owners may exert more control and surveillance over their immediate neighborhood, and two, there are likely fewer suitable targets -- businesses, abortion clinics, government buildings, in residential areas with high home ownership rates,” said Victor Asal, lead author and Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Albany, SUNY.

Unlike group-based terrorism and violent hate crimes, lone-actor terrorism is not more likely to occur in counties with higher percentages of residents living in urban environments, higher percentages of male residents between 15 and 24 years of age, or higher unemployment rates. The researchers also found that lone-actor terrorists tend to attack in less populated states, leading them to conclude that lone-actor terrorists may be a more serious threat outside the major population centers than in larger cities.

“Though our research cannot predict the time or place of future attacks, we hope that knowledge of these trends and risk factors can be useful from an intelligence perspective and can inform strategies for prevention,” Asal said.

Asal and his fellow researchers – Kathleen Deloughery, University at Albany, SUNY, and Ryan King, The Ohio State University – examined the timing, locations, methods, targets, and geographic distributions of lone-actor terrorist attacks, group-based terrorist attacks, and violent hate crimes that occurred between 1992 and 2010. They then used data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to assess whether the counties in which lone-actor terrorism occurred shared common demographic characteristics with those that experienced group-based terrorism and violent hate crimes.

The study was funded through START by the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate’s Resilient Systems Division. It is part of a series of studies in support of the Prevent/Deter program. The goal of this program is to sponsor research that will aid the intelligence and law enforcement communities in assessing potential terrorist threats and support policymakers in developing prevention efforts.