Showing posts with label personal security specialists. Show all posts
Showing posts with label personal security specialists. Show all posts

Monday, September 25, 2017

RyPul Threat Assessments

Personal and Business Protective Services



EXPERTS IN:
Personal Protective Services
 Force Protection
Campus Security Audits
 Site Security Assessments
P2P Currency Transport
Protective Barrier Placement
Physical Site Threat Assessments
Asset Recovery Teams




Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Seeking Executive Protection Agents - Immediate Employment Opportunity (CCW | HR218 Required)

Email: contact@rypulassessments.com 

Executive Protection Agent (CCW Required) – Immediate Openings

Salary: Highly Competitive within the Los Angeles Market

Benefits: Medical – Dental – 401k

Confidential Company - Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA., RyPul Threat Assessments is now accepting resumes for quite professionals whom possess the knowledge, background and skillset to join our team of Executive Protection Professionals in providing excellent and exceptional services for C-Suite level executives in one of the United States leading research and development companies.

We are also seeking armed and unarmed professional to join our Corporate and Residential Security teams based in Los Angeles, CA.

Email: contact@rypulassessments.com 



You will perform the day-to-day close-in protective security functions, Drive the lead vehicle, principal’s vehicle, or follow-vehicle in motorcade operations. Maintain protective formation position during principal’s walking movements, participating in advance security preparations, Man the security post at principal’s residence as required.

Executive Protection Agents must possess an active CCW, or be H.R. 218 qualified no exceptions

Executive Protection Agents

Must possess a current CCW or be HR218 qualified

Must have a valid passport: flexibility to travel domestically or internationally
Must have a valid driver’s license
Have attended a specialized Government or Law Enforcement driving course
Must have attended and been certified by a civilian personal protection course or
Must have attended a DOS WPS protective specialist course
Candidate must have the ability to work independently with little to no supervision
Candidate must be reliable, punctual, and possess a professional demeanor
Must have great communication skills
Must be flexible and willing to work overtime if necessary
Candidate must not possess a criminal history/background
Must be in good physical health
The ideal candidate will have military and/or law enforcement experience
Can operate in dynamic and fast-paced situations
Must possess good time management skills including being punctual and reliable
Be authorized to Work in the United States
Please submit your cover letter, resume, availability and contact information
Required experience: 3 years minimum
Required licenses or certifications will be verified, checked and screened
Email: contact@rypulassessments.com 

Thursday, June 1, 2017

10 mistakes executive protection agents need to stop making

By Christian West & Jared Van Driessche

Tags: Development, Executive protection, Training
Everybody slips up sometimes. We’re only human after all. And as Hall of Fame basketball coach John Wooden pointed out, “If you’re not making mistakes, then you’re not doing anything.”

The wisdom of this statement is of course not to encourage inaction to avoid mistakes, but to learn from them.

So in the spirit of helping everyone working in executive protection get a little smarter – and thereby making the whole industry a little sharper at our game – here’s a list of the 10 mistakes we have seen executive protection agents make too many times – and can learn from.

Thinking it’s about you
We’re sorry if we’re the ones that have to break this to you, but executive protection is a service industry. It’s never about you. It’s always about the client.


It’s about providing clients with knowhow, activities and circumstances that keep them safe, happy and productive. That’s what the client needs, and that’s why they pay us. Everyone has personal stuff to deal with, so deal with it personally, and don’t bring it to your client.

They don’t need to hear about your day, your life or whatever else might be eating you. Even if some monumental, life-changing event just occurred on your way to work or while you’re on coverage. Actually, they shouldn’t hear about it. Why? Because the relationship is professional, not personal. Although the client might at times spend more time with you than they do with their spouse, it’s still not about you. It’s never about you or your needs. Ouch. Deal with it or find another job.

This can be hard, we know. Life happens when you’re on coverage. Maybe a family member has just died, or you received some horrible news like your parent’s house burned to the ground. Still, when you’re on the job, you’re on the job. The friendly “How are you?” gets answered with a “Good, and you?” rather than an open sharing of what’s also running through your head. Because that could disturb the client’s mind. And it’s not about you.



Wanting to be friends with the client
This can be another hard one. It’s the most natural thing in the world to want to be friends with the people we spend time and work with, but in the case of executive protection, it’s not a good idea for either the client or you. And certainly not for your career.

First, let’s all understand that being friendly is not the same as being friends. Maintaining a positive and polite tone is one thing. Trying to establish a personal relationship with a client is something else. It’s important that you don’t move out of the lane of your role as protector. Your job description does not include asking clients for favors or business advice, or trying to get family employed. Don’t involve yourself in business that isn’t related to your business.

Agents who do this are overstepping their bounds and trying to cross a five-lane highway. Even though our clients can at times be lonely and insulated, and might themselves make friendly overtures to protective agents, it’s important to maintain a professional distance. Because sooner or later the agent is going to get hit, despite what seemed to be a good level of comfort and rapport. They are taking advantage of the client, not helping him or her.

Another problem some immature agents have is trying to get noticed and get facetime with the client. They might be a little star struck, and they would like to see the feeling reciprocated. They might try to insert themselves into the client’s life, getting too close to them or to their staff.

But folks who are public figures see this all the time, and they’re seldom enamored with people trying play the game of “I want to get close to you”. They’d rather be far away from people like that. Guess which side of this budding personal relationship is going to get nipped, and be looking for work elsewhere?



Not respecting others who work around the client
Some people need to feel more important than others and end up making trouble for themselves. Don’t be one of those guys.

This problem arises when an executive protection agent thinks the job is more significant than the work of the client’s executive assistant, estate manager, nanny, chef, house cleaner or other staff. While the agent might be good with the client, he or she isn’t necessarily so with everyone else – and treats them differently, with varying levels of respect.

What our unfortunate agent doesn’t understand is this: the woman who cleans the toilet might have a very close relationship to the family that has lasted for years. They would much rather keep the loyal cleaner than the new EP agent who acts like a jerk to her.

Don’t think you’re your irreplaceable. Anyone can be replaced, starting with ill-mannered executive protection agents. So be respectful of the role others have in the client’s staff and life – that’s a great way to earn their respect, too.

Not blending in to client’s lifestyle, company culture or personal preferences
It’s not our job to force our culture or personalities on our clients. It’s our job to fit in.

If you come off as too militaristic, you’re going to make the clients feel like prisoners in their own home. If you act like Robocop around the spouse and children, they’re unlikely to feel comfortable even though they might be safe. And even Mr. Personality might need to take a chill pill, because his perky greetings and chattiness start getting on people’s nerves.



You don’t want to come off like that weird uncle who always manages to show up at the summer garden party in a three-piece suit or the funeral in his favorite Hawaii shirt. You want to blend in, so the client never has to think “who is this guy?!”

Check out Jared’s recent blog on being a social chameleon for way more perspective on this point.

Having a big ego does not make you many amigos on the protective team
So let’s get this straight. The client is a big shot, and that makes you one, too. You’re basking in the strong light of the principal’s halo, as the detail leader no less, and your power gives you license to treat other team members poorly.

Really?

We’ve seen it happen more than once. A guy who is a capable operator rises through the ranks to assume some management responsibility. He’s very aware of his role and perceived power, and he wields it to his own advantage without worrying about how that impacts other members of the protective team. The principal doesn’t know half the story, and likes him. Until he doesn’t.

One day, the guy rubs the principal’s spouse the wrong way, and he’s on his way off the detail. The next day, he’s looking for work and everyone he treated poorly remembers him exactly for that: being a jerk. And who wants to work with a jerk?

Don’t let your career turn to toast because you let your ego do the driving when you got a bit of influence. Instead, pay it forward. Someone just starting out in the industry might be a strong player in a few years, so be sure not to burn bridges you might need later.

Playing favorites
This is another pitfall that too many agents dive right into. It’s understandable because it’s human nature to want to be liked. And it’s yet another a good example of “seemed like a good idea at the time”.

Some agents who don’t get the bigger picture think they are special, and that the client really cares for them. They don’t see anyone else with such a close relationship with the client, and this illusion soon becomes a dangerous pseudo-reality. For one thing, it probably was never true in the first place. But even if it did seem to be, it clouds your judgement and leads to nothing good. Ultimately, it will cost you your job.

Cultivating a culture of favoritism damages team readiness. It’s unhealthy for the wellbeing of the program and the principal. And it’s not a sustainable foundation for anything. The simple fact of the matter is that if you’re the favorite today, someday you won’t be. And where do you go from there? Avoid being the favorite at all costs. With our history of developing and managing EP programs we see people fall into “the favorites trap” all too often.

Favoritism starts out innocently enough and often with the best intentions. The client really likes Tim, and Tim has to do everything. That’s a win-win for a short while, but it soon turns counterproductive.

The detail rapidly becomes a logistical nightmare. Tim will burn out – he’s too close to the client and working too many hours. The rest of the team will suffer – they come off like second-class citizens. The solution is to build everyone up to Tim’s level, not to turn Tim into a fast-flaming fave.

Being a control freak
We’re all for being sticklers when it comes to security and following the SOPs designed to safeguard our principals. But we also recognize that even the best of plans sometimes get broadsided by the client, and all for good reason: whatever the client says it is.

Or doesn’t say. You see, it’s the client’s business, not ours. Business opportunities arise suddenly; someone else’s plans changed suddenly. It doesn’t matter. When we’re on the clock, we’re on client time, not ours.

This can be tough for the pack of alpha males and females who often end up in our industry. We’re used to being in control, and we plan carefully. But when you can’t control it, just embrace it. You’ll end up being less stressed, and you won’t stress the client with unnecessary interruptions designed to satisfy your schedule, not the client’s priorities.

Trying to take advantage of the client financially
You know this is wrong without us telling you, right? We hope so. And yet, the point deserves a little clarification.

Working with C-suite executives, celebrities and other high net worth clients means moving about in some very different environments than most of us are used to. One day you’re bunking at the Motel 6, the next day you’re staying at the Four Seasons. You’re used to figuring out the cost per ounce when you compare hot dogs at the supermarket, and now you’re figuring out a menu that doesn’t have prices on it, trying to decide what to have for dinner.

It’s easy to think that because the client is wealthy, money doesn’t matter and you might as well try that caviar with gold leaf. It’s also wrongheaded. Money does matter – both in terms of how others will view your judgement and integrity – and to program success.

There’s always a budget for everything. Even if you don’t know what it is, assume someone does and is ready to check your expense reports. Go ahead and order a good meal, but don’t feel sanctioned to order the absolute most expensive item on the menu. Keep a clean path. Pay for your personal items yourself. Agents who go far in this industry respect the client’s wallet and work to save their money.

Clogging up information transparency – a.k.a. lying or being selectively honest
It’s true now and it’s been true for thousands of years: Information is power, and asymmetrical access to information can give a competitive advantage or disadvantage. That’s great if you’re fighting a war, but it’s really not good if you’re working on a team together.

We’re not saying that everyone needs to know everything. But the executive protection agent who deliberately resists sharing information, reduces information transparency or spreads false information is on his or her way to career suicide.

Some inexperienced agents might have the erroneous belief that hoarding information will further their interests. They’re making a fundamental mistake. They haven’t understood that what’s good for the team is good for the principal and for themselves. We’ve seen agents try to keep executive assistants in the dark to make them look incompetent. We’ve heard of agents who say the principal’s spouse prefers this or that driver – even when that wasn’t the case – to play favorites or gain personal advantage.

People like this are worse than dishonest. If they’re willing to hijack parts of the program for their own reasons, what else are they willing to do? Their reasons are never good, and manipulating the healthy flow of useful information will always hit them in the back of the head like a boomerang.

Getting the balance wrong between tactical discipline and friendly service
Being a good executive protection agent means juggling multiple roles seamlessly and imperceptibly. We’re the tactical tough guy when we need to be. We’re the friendly concierge if that’s what’s called for. We know not to overplay either hand. And we know when to switch immediately.

There are often multiple ways to accomplish the same objective. Use your situational and social awareness to find the ideal path, striking a middle way between the many possible extremes. You want to make sure the room you’re leading the principal to is safe? Great, but you don’t need to act as if you’re clearing a house in Ramadi. Find another way that works, and doesn’t make the principal wonder what’s going on and what movie you’re in.

Similarly, it’s great to be service-minded, but not excessively friendly in all circumstances. We’re here to facilitate the principal’s smooth flow through the day and night, but we’re willing to stand up and disrupt the good vibes if that means maintaining security.

Like so many other things, it’s a balance. We wish you luck and skill in finding yours!

Let’s learn from our mistakes
The good thing about mistakes is that they’re learning opportunities: they help us to discover better ways of doing things. Once you get over the initial pain of having put your hand too close to the fire, you know better the next time and can avoid a lifetime of burnt fingers. At least you could know better.

It’s only when we continue to make the same mistakes over and over that people start calling us names. Similarly, not learning from others’ mistakes is rarely an indication of a sharp mind.

We admit that we’ve learned some of them the hard way – by putting our own hands in the flames, so to speak. Other lessons came easier, by observing colleagues and staff get burned themselves. But they’re all things we need to be aware of and get better at.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Cannabis Transportation, Currency, CBD and Extract Transport Services in California

Project 7 Security Group has a solution to protect Cannabis, Currency, CBD and Extracts with armed transportation security.

LOS ANGELES -- Project 7 Security Group, a California Licensed PPO Security Company and Security Contractor, now offers Marijuana and Cannabis related businesses a safe, affordable, low-profile and secure means to transport either their cash or currency, plant-based products, cannabis extract items (including edibles) to storage and dispensary locations throughout California.

Cannabis, Currency, CBD and Extract Transport Services in California

We are in full compliance with all guidelines of The California Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act (MMRSA) as it relates to security operations in the State of California.

Hear our interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykjkbZ2qzHQ&t=22s



Project 7 understands the need for operational solutions when supporting high threat critical business security operations in the United States. Project 7 security group consultants are trained to detect you and/or your institution's vulnerabilities, then assist you in designing a proactive defense, whether in a mobile, static or defense in place posture.

Call us at 800-560-3103; we can help secure your bottom line.

Find us on the web at: http://www.project7security.com/

CA PPO #119834

Contact
Project 7 Security Group
Phone: (800) 560-3103
wp@project7security.com

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Cannabis, Currency, CBD and Extract Transport Services in California


Project 7 Security Protect Cannabis, Currency, CBD, Extracts with Armed Transportation Security

LOS ANGELES - March 29, 2017 -- Project 7 Security Group a California Licensed PPO Security Company and Security Contractor now offers Marijuana and Cannabis related businesses a safe, affordable, low-profile and secure means to transport either their cash or currency, plant based products, cannabis extract items (including edibles) to storage and dispensary locations throughout California.



Cannabis, Currency, CBD and Extract Transport Services in California

We are in full compliance with all guidelines of The California Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act (MMRSA) as it relates to security operations in the State of California.

Hear our interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykjkbZ2qzHQ&t=22s






Project 7 understands the need for operational solutions when supporting high threat critical business security operations in the United States. Project 7 security group consultants are trained to detect you and or your institution's vulnerabilities, then assist you in designing a proactive defense, whether in a mobile, static or defense in place posture.


Brandon at the Cannabis Business Expo San Diego Event 2017


Warren at the Cannabis Business Expo San Diego Event 2017


Call us at 800-560-3103, we can help secure your bottom line.


Find us on the web at: http://www.project7security.com/


CA PPO #119834


--- End ---


Contact

Project 7 Security Group
Phone: (800) 560-3103
wp@project7security.com

Photos:

https://www.prlog.org/12611966/1
https://www.prlog.org/12611966/2

Tags : Cannabis Transport Security, Cash Transport Security, Marijuana Security, Marijuana Dispensary Security, Marijuana Plant Transport, Armed Cannabis Security, Cannabis Extract Transport, Marijuana Edibles

Monday, March 20, 2017

Blue Lives Lost: Dramatic rise in police officers gunned down in line of duty in 2016

Of those men and women in blue who died in 2016, 62 were killed by gunfire – a marked rise from the 39 the year before – about a dozen of them shot by gunmen who set out to kill police.

In Baton Rouge, little 9-month-old Mason Jackson sees his father’s face every day, all the time – in photographs. His mother makes sure of that, makes sure he feels his father’s presence.

His mother tells him what a selfless, caring man his daddy, Montrell Jackson, was, and how much he wanted a child – they tried for nearly two years. She tells Mason how ecstatic Montrell was when he came into the world in March.



“That’s what hurts the most,” said Trenisha Jackson, “that he’s not here for his son. He was so excited about being a father. He felt his responsibility was to make sure he raised a wonderful young man. [Montrell’s] father was not in his life. He really wanted to be there for his son.”

Montrell Jackson, 32, was shot fatally in an ambush in July – when Mason was 4 months old – by a man targeting police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Baton Rouge Police Corporal Montrell Jackson, who was shot and killed by Gavin Long along with two other officers on July 17. (Officer Down Memorial Page)  That gunman killed a total of three officers – just a fraction of the nearly 140 law enforcement officers who died in the line of duty this year, up from 130 in 2015, according to the Officer Down Memorial Page, a non-profit group founded and run by active and retired law enforcement officials.

The most recent shootings of police officers took place on Friday.



In Mt. Vernon, Washington, Mike “Mick” McLaurghry, a 30-year veteran, was shot in the back of the head while responding to a call. Officials said he was “hanging in there” in critical condition after surgery.

Later the same day, Sgt. Rob Hatchell, of Dallas, Oregon, was shot in the leg while attempting to arrest an intoxicated man.

Of those men and women in blue who died in 2016, 62 were killed by gunfire – a marked rise from the 39 the year before – about a dozen of them shot by gunmen who set out to kill police.

“What we’re seeing now, this year, is a big increase in gunfire murders of police officers,” Lt. Randy Sutton, a retired police officer and author who represents Blue Lives Matter, told FoxNews.com. “The methodology, where they are targeted attacks or ambushes or where people are lured into attacks, is up too. We haven’t seen that since the late ‘60s or ‘70s, when there was a tremendous amount of anti-police terrorism.”

Sutton, like many others in law enforcement, say that tension between police and minority groups like Black Lives Matter that have organized to focus attention on profiling and what they argue is unwarranted use of force has led some to see those in uniform as the enemy.

“It legitimizes a call for terror, a call for violence,” Sutton said. “It adds an element of danger for law enforcement.”



He added, “Of course not everyone who is in the protests believes that. But when there’s a mob in place and fervor builds up, people do things they wouldn’t normally do independently. And it can inspire lone wolf attacks. There are weak-minded people, some mentally disturbed, who absorb this call to action and act upon it.”

The methodology, where they are targeted attacks or ambushes or where people are lured into attacks ... we haven’t seen that since the late ‘60s or ‘70s, when there was a tremendous amount of anti-police terrorism.

- Randy Sutton, retired police lieutenant who represents Blue Lives Matter
The deadliest assaults occurred in July in Dallas and Baton Rouge amid protests over black men who had died in encounters with police.

A black gunman in Dallas opened fire on officers at a Black Lives Matter protest, killing five officers and wounding four others.

Tensions rose in Baton Rouge, where thousands of people were angry over the death of 37-year-old Alton Sterling, a black man killed by white Baton Rouge officers after a confrontation at a convenience store.

Those in law enforcement say they know they are signing up for a potentially dangerous job when they enter the profession.

“There are risks every officer knows going in,” Sutton said. “That includes everything from going up against an armed suspect who is going to resist and going to do everything to escape, including shooting to try and kill you, to being struck by a car during a traffic stop.”

He went on, “But what is particularly frightening and disturbing at this point are the assassinations and entrapments, where police officers are lured into situations [in order] to kill them.”

Before her husband’s death, Ternisha Jackson just let the day-to-day risks of police work stay on the margins of her thoughts.

“Montrell loved his job,” his widow said. “We put the risks out of our minds.”

The growing protests outside police departments across the country, however, concerned her.

“That was the first time I became afraid, I was afraid for him, after everything taking place,” she said. “I was going out of my mind. I never feared for his life until the protests.”

She understands the anger many people feel toward police. She knows, too, that some of it could be justified. But the answer, she says, is not violence.

“I get pulled over, and it’s for a reason,” she said. “A broken tail light, it’s for [your] safety ... Police die protecting you. They chose to protect and serve, and they deserve respect.”

When someone encounters a police who acts unprofessionally, Jackson said, “They should call them out, file a report.”

In Texas, Cpl. Marcie St. John knew that a large but peaceful protest was underway in Dallas in response to fatal police shootings that week in Baton Rouge and suburban St. Paul, Minnesota.

She had finished her shift at about 8:30 p.m. and was on her way home – looking toward starting vacation the next day -- when she received a phone call from a colleague in law enforcement.

“My friend calls me and said, ‘Something is going downtown,’ something major,” St. John recalled.



Within minutes, she got an alert from her department, asking that everyone be ready to report to duty. At home, as she put on her tactical gear, she got a call from another friend who told her that her best friend, Michael Smith, her former partner, had been shot while on duty at the protest.

“He was a sound cop, a strong cop,” said St. John, whose brother, who also was a police officer, died in the line of duty when they both were rookies. “I never, ever thought it would happen to Mike.”

Sgt. Michael Smith was one of five Dallas police officers Micah Johnson killed on July 7. (Dallas Police Department) The killer was 25-year-old Micah Johnson, an Army veteran who told authorities he was upset about fatal police shootings and wanted to exterminate policemen, "especially white officers," officials said.

Johnson, who was killed by a robot-delivered bomb dispatched by Dallas police, had amassed a personal arsenal at his suburban home, including bomb-making materials, bulletproof vests, rifles, ammunition and a journal of combat tactics.

The killings marked the deadliest day for U.S. law enforcement since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. In all, 12 officers were shot.



“Everything that’s going on in law enforcement, officers being ambushed,” said St. John, “in my 25-year career, I’ve never seen this. All of our officers – their lives and their deaths – have to matter.”

She has been helping Smith's widow, Heidi, and their two young daughters put their lives back together.

The youngest daughter, who was 9 at the time of Smith's killing, has thought back to her last conversation with her father before he went off to work.

Smith asked his daughter for a kiss, but she said she was busy playing a game. He pressed again, saying "This may be the last time,” St. John said he told her.

Ten days before his own death, Montrell Jackson felt deeply distressed over the contentious protests and Dallas ambush – both as a police officer and a black man.

He said as much in a message he posted on his Facebook page.

 “I’m tired physically and emotionally,” he wrote, according to screen shots of his post, which was taken down after his death. “Disappointed in some family, friends and officers for some reckless comments, but hey, what’s in your heart is in your heart. I still love you all because hate takes too much energy, but I definitely won’t be looking at you the same. Thank you to everyone [who] has reached out to me or my wife – it was needed and much appreciated. I swear to God I love this city, but I wonder if this city loves me.”


Jackson saw himself as a bridge between police and black residents, saying he understood the difficulty of being in each group’s shoes.

“I’ve experienced so much in my short life, and the past 3 days have tested me to the core,” he wrote. “In uniform, I get nasty hateful looks and out of uniform some consider me a threat.”


He appealed to protesters.

“Please don’t let hate infect your heart,” Jackson wrote. “This city MUST and WILL get better. I’m working in these streets, so any protesters, officers, friends, family or whoever, if you see me and need a hug or want to say a prayer, I got you.”

In Missouri, Gavin Eugene Long, a black separatist, never saw, or cared about, Jackson’s plea. He traveled to Baton Rouge to hunt for police officers.

And that is where he ended the life of little Mason’s father.

Elizabeth Llorente is Senior Reporter for FoxNews.com, and can be reached at Elizabeth.Llorente@Foxnews.com. Follow her on https://twitter.com/Liz_Llorente

Origami inspired shield might save police officer's lives

Posted by Jessica Romero

A mechanical engineer professor took on the problem of police protection and he might have found a great solution. He and his team drew inspiration from an unlikely source: origami.

The shield can be compactly folded and easily transported. It consists of thin sheets of Kevlar and is about as heavy as a large suitcase. Even though it is compact it expands in five seconds which allows it to be used in unexpected dangerous situations.

The designer also pictured it being used to protect children and other people in dangerous situations where there is no cover.

According to Daily Mail:

Design is made up of 12 layers of bulletproof Kevlar.

Weighs only 55 pounds (25 kilograms). Many of the steel shields currently used approach 100 pounds (45 kilograms).

It uses a Yoshimura origami crease pattern to expand around an officer, providing protection on the side in addition to protecting them in the front.

When expanded — which takes only five seconds — it can provide cover for officers and stop bullets from several types of handguns.

In testing, the barrier successfully stopped bullets from smaller 9 mm pistols, all the way up to .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum 'hand cannons'.

Read more: http://kfiam640.iheart.com/onair/tim-conway-jr-33371/origami-inspired-shield-might-save-police-15574462/#ixzz4buad5gz8

This foam stops bullets cold and pulverizes them to dust

Foam body armor? Even armor-piercing bullets cannot get through this foam.

And the foam doesn’t just stop bullets. It destroys them…this foam decimates bullets into dust.

North Carolina State University Professor Afsaneh Rabiei led the team that created the amazing foam.  This is not ordinary foam like the kind used for shaving, for example. This is a special type of foam called composite metal foams, or CMF.  The military and law enforcement could use this kind of foam for advanced, ultra light body armor to protect personnel.

And this research team has other foams up its sleeve that have the potential to keep military and first responders safe from radiation and extreme heat too.

BULLET V. FOAM



Sound impossible that foam-based armor could stop armor piercing rounds? Testing has proved it is indeed possible.  In tests conducted by the development team, the foam body armor was able to defeat an armor-piercing bullet. And on impact, their foam smashed the bullet into powder.

 To challenge the foam material with bullets, the team built a shield. The strike face - the side facing the weapon - was made with the new composite metal foam together with boron carbide ceramics. The backplates – the side that would face the user - were made of Kevlar.

In tests, the team shot at the foam body armor with 7.62 x 63 mm M2 armor-piercing round.

How well did it work?

Their foam absorbed the bullet’s kinetic energy.

The foam worked so well that an armor-piercing round could only penetrate less than an inch on the weapon-facing side of the shield.

On the side facing the warfighter’s body, the bullet was only able to cause an 8 mm indentation on the back .

Body armor innovation is important because it can save lives.

The National Institute of Justice standard allows up to 44 mm indentation from a bullet on side facing the user– so the foam performs  80 percent better than the maximum standard.

HOW IS IT MADE?

In basic terms, the foam is a composite metal foam. What does that mean?

THE 5 COOLEST MILITARY INNOVATIONS OF 2016

To make it, the team takes molten metal and bubbles gas through it. This process creates a sort of froth. When the froth cools, it becomes a lightweight, ultra strong matrix material.

Processes like 3D printing and milling can also be used to make composite metal foam.

The team first produced a foam shield that could block radiation.

This foam is able to stop and block X-rays. In tests, it can even protect against various forms of gamma rays.  According to NASA, gamma rays are produced by the hottest and most energetic objects in the universe like supernova explosions and areas around black holes. Here on Earth, they can also be produced in nuclear fission.  In tests, the foam could also protect against neutron radiation that can be produced by nuclear fission or fusion.  To develop radiation shielding, the team created a “high-Z steel-steel foam”. This one is a combination of stainless steel with a small amount of tungsten shaped into hollow spheres. This is then introduced into the steel matrix and creates the foam.

Current protection options tend to be very cumbersome, awkward and heavy. The foam shielding could provide a lightweight, strong alternative for the military. It could also have potential for transportation and storage of hazardous materials.

Space exploration and transportation of nuclear waste are just two other examples of how this foam could be used.

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy supported the team’s development of foam that is two times better at protecting against fire and heat as regular metal.

For example, their lightweight stainless steel foam was far more effective than stainless steel.

To examine the foam’s heat protection, the team tested some of the foam that was 0.75 inches thick against 800 degrees Celsius fire for 30 minutes. And they tested a regular piece of stainless steel the same size and width against the same heat.

Which resisted the heat better? The foam. The foam withstood the heat twice as long.

It took four minutes for the extreme heat to reach the other side of the regular stainless steel from the fire. The team’s foam withstood the heat for eight minutes before it reached the other end.

Being able to withstand heat longer could provide a number of advantages. For example, it could mean the difference between an accident causing an explosion – or not.

Foam like this could also be leveraged by the military to safely transport and store explosives. It could even be used for the safekeeping and transfer of nuclear and other hazardous materials.

Go inside dangerous missions and hear firsthand from American Special Operations warriors about how they have used advanced body armor in combat on Tactical Talk.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

'Outmanned & outgunned:' Tribal police officers face dangerous challenges

The shooting death of 27-year-old Navajo Nation Police Officer Houston James Largo, who was responding to a routine domestic violence call in the remote community of Prewitt, N.M. on Sunday, highlights the unique challenges his agency faces in fighting crime.

Tribal officers often patrol vast, desolate areas – sometimes 1,000 miles at a time – that are often more underdeveloped and dangerous than other parts of the country. And they do so without many of the resources and funding other law enforcement agencies receive.

So the officers often find themselves outmanned, outgunned and unprepared.

“One of the most trying times I have in serving as president of the Navajo Nation is when I get word that one of our police officers has had their life taken needlessly,” Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye said in a press release. “It brings to mind the situations our officers face every day in responding to calls, getting in their unit and putting their lives on the line. It must be difficult for family members to know their loved ones might not return.”

Begaye has called for continued support of police officers who are protecting the Navajo Nation.

It sometimes takes tribal officers more than an hour to respond to calls and many times they do so alone without any backup.

“Our nation mourns for you as does the country,” Begaye said. “Our officer’s lives are precious. They are the ones who stand guard over our nation and protect us.”

Navajo Nation Council Delegate Edmund Yazzie said a major problem the Nation faces is domestic violence, which has plagued the Navajo Nation for years.

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“Unfortunately, many of our officers face this devastating issue every day when they are on duty and sadly it resulted in the loss of one of our bravest today,” Yazzie said in a statement on Sunday.

Prewitt, N.M., a tiny community not counted by the U.S. Census, rests along Interstate 40, which is 81 miles west of Albuquerque, the state’s capital and its largest city.

It is remote areas like this, defined by majestic red mesas, patches of sagebrush in rust-colored dirt, enclaves of mobile homes in various states of wear and disrepair, and dark, winding roads – many not even paved – that comprise the typical patrol areas for officers like Largo of the Navajo Nation .

The four-and-a-half-year veteran was one of 200 patrol officers, 70 short of what is mandated by the tribe. They patrol 27,425 square miles in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah that house the nation’s largest Indian reservation, which has a population of 180,000.

Navajo Nation Police Chief Phillip Francisco told Fox News that it is not unusual for one officer to be responsible for patrolling 1,000 miles.

“The Crownpoint District, where officer Largo served, is our largest at over 4,000 square miles and we typically have five officers on per shift,” Francisco said. “It can take officers more than an hour to respond to a call, mostly by themselves.”

Francisco said this daunting challenge places his officers in one of the most unique categories of any law enforcement agency in the nation despite assistance from New Mexico State Police and the sheriff departments of the counties where the reservations reside.

Prewitt is nestled in McKinley County in northwest New Mexico. The FBI investigates violent crimes in the region since Indian land is on federal property. But the tribal police officers are basically on their own for other crimes. A Safe Trails Task Force initiative was formed in 1994 to combat a growing crime wave in Indian Country.

“Most departments in the country have more than 20 officers per 10,000 residents. We have 11,” Francisco said. “This is a staggering amount of area and people to cover.”

Contrary to the 1970s hit, Ball of Confusion by the Temptations, which had a line that said…”the only safe place to live is on an Indian reservation,” the reality is that per capita reservations are among the most dangerous.

Federal statistics in 2013 shocked the nation. The numbers showed the violent crime rate on Indian reservations was 20 times the national average. The homicide rate passed that of Seattle and Boston.

By 2015, the homicide rate had dropped to 17, the number of rapes decreased to 64 and there were 1,358 cases of aggravated assault.

Domestic violence rates have long been off the charts – many times fueled by alcohol abuse.

These toxic factors mixed together sometimes have dangerous consequences for police officers putting their life on the line. Other than Largo, Navajo Nation Police Officer Alex Yazzie, 42, also was killed in the line of duty in 2015.

"Our officers put themselves in highly volatile situations every day in addressing domestic violence situations," Begaye said in his statement. "Although they are highly trained, they can still be severely wounded, which unfortunately is what happened today."

McKinley County Sheriff Ron Silversmith had worked with Largo both when he served with the Gallup Police Department and the sheriff’s department. He said he knows first-hand the dangers police officers face when they patrol the remote Navajo Reservation.

"It is probably one of the most dangerous jobs a police officer can have," Silversmith said. "There are a lot of times where there is no radio contact and you're on your own. You have to be strong willed to work out there."

Silversmith said officers are regularly out in the middle of nowhere on their own. It gets so dark in some areas you cannot see your hand in front of your face.

"They are short staffed and outnumbered and out gunned," he said.

Begaye said the tribe recently upgraded equipment and protective devices for its police department. But they still fall far behind other departments. Francisco said he needs to send recruits to Arizona Department of Public Safety’s academy because their building was condemned.

The other challenge he faces is recruiting new officers. The officers are paid $5 per hour less than surrounding state and municipal law enforcement agencies. And, with the vast amount of land that needs to be patrolled, recruits are far and few between.

In the meantime, the police department is burying another police officer.

Officials said a suspect is in custody in the Largo case but has not released the person’s name. The suspect will face federal charges, police said.


Joseph J. Kolb is a regular contributor to Fox News Latino.

Paris shooting: terror investigation launched after suspect shot dead

Man identified by security official as Ziyed Ben Belgacem was killed hours after he shot and injured a policeman north of Paris

French anti-terror officials have launched an investigation after a man known to the security services shot at a police officer in northern Paris before travelling across the city to Orly airport, where he was killed following an altercation with another officer.

The attacker was said to be a radicalised Muslim who appeared on a security watchlist, police sources told Reuters. France’s anti-terrorism prosecutor later confirmed that an inquiry had been opened into the incident on Saturday morning.

The suspect was identified by a security official as Ziyed Ben Belgacem, a 39-year-old born in France, the Associated Press reported.

Prosecutors said the suspect’s house was among scores searched in November 2015 in the immediate aftermath of terror attacks in Paris in which 130 people were killed. Those searches targeted people with suspected radical leanings.

The suspect’s father and brother were detained by police for questioning on Saturday.

The French president, François Hollande, said the investigation would determine whether the Orly attacker “had a terrorist plot behind him”.

The French defence minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, said the attacker had assaulted a patrol of three air force soldiers, one of whom was a woman.

The attacker wrestled her to the floor and tried to take her weapon, but she was able to keep hold of it. The two other soldiers then opened fire to protect her and passengers in the airport, he said.

 A trolley stretcher is wheeled into Orly airport southern terminal after the shooting.
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 A stretcher is wheeled into Orly airport’s southern terminal after the shooting. Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters
The air force personnel were deployed as part of Sentinelle, a military operation launched in January 2015 after the Paris terrorist attacks to support the police and protect sensitive sites.

The interior minister, Bruno Le Roux, said the man shot dead at the airport was linked with a car-jacking incident earlier on Saturday in a northern suburb of Paris. He said the man had shot at a female police officer after being stopped for speeding before fleeing the scene and stealing a car at gunpoint.

Le Roux said the officer had not been badly injured.


No explosive devices were found on the dead man’s body, an interior ministry spokesman said.

About 3,000 people were evacuated from both terminals at Orly and all flights were suspended, with some diverted to Charles de Gaulle airport. Some flights began operating again early Saturday afternoon. No one else was injured in the Orly incident.

 Passengers wait among emergency vehicles at Orly airport.
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 Passengers wait among emergency vehicles at Orly airport. Photograph: Benoit Tessier/Reuters
The airport shooting follows after a similar incident last month at the Louvre museum in central Paris.

France remains under a state of emergency in the wake of the attack on the Bataclan music venue in November 2015 in which jihadi gunmen killed 90 people, and the Nice truck attack last July that claimed the lives of 84 people and injured hundreds more.

On a visit to Paris on Saturday the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met survivors of the Bataclan attack, praising their bravery and the “amazing progress” of their recovery.

The royal couple met a 25-year-old, known only as Jessica, who was shot seven times in the leg, hip and back as she dined with friends at La Belle Equipe restaurant, and Kevin, 28, a Bataclan concert-goer shot in the leg.

The couple visited the hospital where the pair have been treated as reports of the incident at Orly airport emerged. A Kensington Palace spokesman said the royal visit was unaffected.

This article was corrected on 19 March 2017. Sentinelle is an operation, not an elite special forces group as suggested earlier.

Saturday, October 8, 2016

Project 7 Security Group: a U.S. Leader In Personal Protective Security Service




LOS ANGELES - Oct. 8, 2016 - RyPul-- The United States – Project 7 Security Group (P7SG), a full-service legal U.S. Corporation dedicated to personal protective security and custom protection specialty for private sector clients throughout the country, this week officially opened their business for all interested and needing clients.

Comprised of protective specialists whom have operated and provided high-level static and mobile security services around the world, for US Government clientele, Non-Governmental Organizations, Multi-National Corporations, and a host of other clients, P7SG is ready to show the American populace what privatized security can do for their family's well-being.

"P7SG is perfectly positioned to answer the call for providing world-class security and to employ accomplished military personnel," said Brandon Gatewood, Founder and Owner of P7SG. "In a world growing increasingly dangerous from global terrorism and ISIS-related threats, people can't wait around for the government to have their back anymore. That's why we're privatizing our expert security services for everyone."


P7SG Press Release












P7SG is offering custom-tailored security management services for critical infrastructure assets, to include reviews and assessments of existing security systems, security audits, emergency and contingency planning, and secure document disposal.

Additionally, the operation is also providing trained drivers delivering high-level transport security and executive protection in armored vehicles. P7SG's drivers are professional trained and familiar with social, economic, political, and threat situations in any particular area.

"Our executive protection services focus on keeping our clients safe, secure, and in the know with regards to unforeseen threats and undercurrents," said Senior Vice President Warren Pulley. "We are committed to providing our clients with peace of mind in an increasingly chaotic world, and we want everyone to know they have access to our expertly trained and highly-professional security services."

P7SG also provides 24-7 protective services for high-level individuals, diplomats, executives, ambassadors, and foreign nationals.

P7SG is currently seeking interested investors please following the below link for additional information.

https://www.fundable.com/project-7-security-group

For more information, visit: http://www.project7security.com/.

Contact
Brandon Gatewood, CEO
Project 7 Security Group
800-560-3103
***@project7securitygroup.com

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

The New American Strategy Should Be Disengagement In The World

In the never ending war against dictators, terrorism, it off-shoots and splinter groups, the United States is expected by every western government to lead the charge and carry the battle standards for conflicts against every dangerous ideologue in the world.

Since WWII the United States has been directly responsible for between 10 to 15 million war deaths in the Korean, Vietnam, Iraq Wars (2) as well as fatalities in Cambodia and Laos. The U.S. Government by proxy wars have been responsible for another 9-14 million deaths in Afghanistan, Angola, The DRC, East Timor, Guatemala, Indonesia, Pakistan and Sudan, which brings our countries total death by conflict since WWII to somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 – 30 million deaths from wars scattered around the world.



Now some of these conflicts have been fought for the greater good, and some not so much so, but at what point does war and death become a lost cause in itself?  Isn’t 20-30 millions deaths enough for us to say, let Europe and the rest of the world “lead from the front ” on wars, police actions, military engagements, short tactical operations and the fallout of both?

I for one don’t consider it a weakness for the U.S. to disengage from each and every conflict that modern man has become engaged in, only to have our best and brightest killed off for an uncertain peace time and time again.  The warrior culture is alive and well in America and we all would all be better served to place limits on how many generations of our youth we want engaged in perpetual war.



As a former member of the U.S. Military who entered service in 1987, I was on active duty for the overthrow of Panamanian dictator Noriega in 1989, the 1991 Gulf War, the 1993 Somalia incursion and the Bosnian conflict of 1994.  As a police officer in Los Angeles from 1994 to 2006, I was often on the other end of the tactics employed in war, used against me in the inner cities, by those who had gone to war and come home to become home grown terrorist’s as gang members. And most recently I have worked in the capacity of a security contractor in the middle east providing security for diplomats and other NGO’s throughout the region, so I understand all of the nuances that leave the Middle East a fertile ground for combat and strife, and I for one do not believe that modern man has the capacity to solve religious disputes that have evolved over thousands of years.



The world has been engaged in Middle East peace talks since 1949, with no concrete solutions in sight and until the people in those regions began to have dialogue on a human level, you can expect the bloodshed to continue on a daily basis, and the power brokers in the region need to install the peace NOT the United States, because we cannot, and yes even with all of our military might we cannot.

I have heard all the rhetoric for war from my enlistment in 1987 until today and it continues to be the same, it is usually the ” US vs THEM ” mantra, which works well on the highly uninformed and war hawks, yeah those war hawks in our government that will not send their own children off to fight for the latest war cause that they believe in so highly.



I absolutely believe in defense of our country, but only for the imminent, immediate protection of the American people on American soil, and I no longer believe we should have the protective buffer of American boots on the ground around the world, for the peace and security of Europe, The Middle East, Asia or the African Continent, even with overwhelming support from any government that wants our government to engage in combat operations.  If other countries believe that their peace and stability is threatened by a wolf at the door, then let those countries arm, outfit and send their young men and women off to war to defend it’s way of life.  We can and should honor our diplomatic agreement’s to aid our allies in a time of war, but we as Americans cannot continue to police the world, because the latest splinter group with the newest scary name pops up and says “boo”.

Yes we have to deal with the extremism that continues to plot attacks against our homeland, and we have the most capable special forces operators in the world to do that, on a surgical strike case by case basis. However the large scale company and division size combat operations should be a thing of the past for the U.S. unless we have a nation on our shores intent on immediate invasion of our homeland.

A little bit of isolationism at this point in human history is probably just what the doctor has ordered.

i·so·la·tion·ism (ˌīsəˈlāSHəˌnizəm/Submit ) (noun) : a policy of remaining apart from the affairs or interests of other groups, especially the political affairs of other countries.

So before the comments began, lets get a few things straight.

I am not a coward, I am a patriot.
I am not afraid of combat, I have served.
I am not an appeaser, I believe you kill before being killed.
I am not shortsighted, I understand nuance.
I am an American.

Written By:
Warren Pulley, CEO
RyPul Threat Assessments
An International Protection and Assessment Company

Sunday, July 24, 2016

11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World

LAW ENFORCEMENT ACROSS the globe use semi-autonomous technology to do what humans find too dangerous, boring, or just can’t. This week, the Cleveland Police had a few nonlethal ones on hand at the Republican National Convention. But even those can be outfitted to kill, as we saw in Dallas earlier this month when police strapped a bomb to an explosive-detonation robot, and boom: a non-lethal robot became a killer. If that thought scares you, you’re not alone. Human rights activists worry these robots lack social awareness crucial to decision-making. “For example, during mass protests in Egypt in January 2011 the army refused to fire on protesters, an action that required innate human compassion and respect for the rule of law,” said Rasha Abdul Rahim of Amnesty International in a statement last year arguing that the UN should ban killer robots. More than a thousand robotics experts, including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, signed a letter last summer warning against machines that can select targets without human control. We wanted to find out just how many of these things are in use around the world. But law enforcement isn’t exactly forthcoming about the topic, so this list is not exhaustive. Here’s what we found.




With the Republican National Convention underway, Cleveland police have enlisted the help of a new robot named Griffin, built by students from the local community college. Standing only 12 inches tall, the six-wheeled rover is designed to go places police can’t fit, like under a car or behind dumpsters to look for explosives. Griffin is equipped with a camera and light, which allows police to scope out the situation from a monitor at a safe distance. Unlike the larger bomb squad and military grade robots, like the one police strapped an explosive to in Dallas, Griffin is light enough to be deployed quickly without needing to be hauled out in a big truck. And it’s one of many robots Ohio police have on hand. Public records requests show Ohio law enforcement have received 40 robots from the federal 1033 program that transfers military equipment to local law enforcement.

India’s Riot-Control Drones
Police in the Uttar Pradesh region of India last year purchased a set of Skunk drones built to shower crowds with pepper spray and paintballs. The drone, manufactured by South African firm Desert Wolf, can hover mid-air over a protest and fire up to 20 paintballs (or other “non-lethal” ammunition) per second while simultaneously dispersing tear gas pellets onto people. Police control the drone from the ground, which levitates via eight motors that each power a 16-inch propeller. It’s outfitted with onboard speakers so authorities can communicate with crowds, as well as bright strobe lights and “eye safe” lasers to disorient and disperse a gathering. And of course, no drone is complete without surveillance capability. The Skunk comes packed with a thermal camera, an HD camera, and an onboard microphone, you know, to give the cops something to watch later.

South Korea's Prison Robo-Guards
Correctional officers at Pohang prison in South Korea had robot to help keep watch for them, during a trial in 2012.  Standing 5-feet tall, the Robo-Guard is equipped with 3D cameras and software to recognize inmate behavior. The robot’s makers say it’s able to report when something seems abnormal, like if there’s a fight or an inmate on the floor. The human in the control center can communicate with prisoners via the robot’s two-way radios. It’s unclear whether the robots were put into full-time use in South Korea after the tests, though recent reports indicate South Korea is now building robo-guards to keep patrol during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Isreal's Deadly Rover
This 26-pound, eleven 11-inch-tall robot is packing a 9mm Glock pistol. Designed by Israeli firm General Robotics Ltd with help from the Israeli Police Counter Terrorism Unit, the Dogo can fire up to five rounds in two seconds. This small land rover can enter a house quietly, climb stairs, and even maneuver over obstacles. Ready with eight cameras and two-way audio, the Dogo allows police to communicate with  and fire upon suspects without risking their lives, according to the company’s website.  If law enforcement aren’t looking to kill, the Dogo can also carry pepper spray or a dazzling light module to cause temporary blindness.

LAPD’s Huge Smasher
The Bat Cat—shorthand for Bomb Assault Tactical Control Assessment Tool—is the Los Angeles Police Department’s radio-controlled monster. Designed to pick up a car bomb with its massive, 50-foot telescoping arm, this unmanned ground vehicle reaches top speed at six miles per hour. While it might have been designed to remove massive explosives, the Bat Cat can also rip through a house in minutes, according to The Los Angeles Times,which reported that the LAPD used it to tear down the walls of a home during a standoff in 2011. Cops can switch out the end of the telescoping arm with a claw, a bucket, a forklift, or battering rams, and it can handle a payload of around 12,000 pounds, more than enough to haul your typical car bomb far from harm’s way. The Bat Cat was constructed on the chassis of a Caterpillar Telehandler, so it’s basically just pimped out remote-controlled forklift. Still, best to keep your distance.

Japan's Drone-Catching Drone
This is meta. Japanese police are using drones to take down drones, but they’re not shooting them. That would cause debris. Instead police are using a net. Japanese police introduced a net-wielding drone fleet earlier this year to catch suspicious looking small unmanned aircrafts that fly over sensitive government locations like butterflies. It takes a giant net to catch a drone, and the police fleet is equipped with a 6.5-foot-by-10-foot lattice. Last, year, the BBC reported that police deployed the net drones  in response to a drone carrying a non-harmful amount of radioactive sand that landed on the roof of the Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s house—a stunt that turned out to be a protest by an anti-nuclear activist. Japan’s drone-catching drone certainly seems a lot safer than the Dutch National Police Force’s solution—they trained eagles to take down unauthorized drones.

Brazil’s Olympic Peacekeepers
The Olympics are in less than a month, and Motherboard reports that Brazilian police forces are pulling out all the stops, including calling on a number of model 510 PackBots that were originally acquired in preparation for the World Cup, a military grade bomb detection and reconnaissance robot that was used after the Fukushima meltdown in Japan and was deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Each PackBot 510 weighs around 65 pounds and carries with it four cameras, as well as its main feature, a 6-foot telescoping arm that can lift a 30-pound payload. PackBots are primarily deployed for bomb detection and disposal; it can even use mechanical wire cutters attached to the end of its arm. The PackBot climbs stairs, maneuvers in water, and can crawl around at about 6 miles per hour, faster than most adults jog. With millions of people coming to town for the Olympics, Brazilian police will use the technology to inspect suspicious packages.

Democratic Republic of Congo's Traffic Robocops
In Kinshasa, the sprawling capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo,  The Guardian reports that city officials installed a handful of giant solar-powered robot traffic cops in 2013 in an effort to reduce deaths and get more people to follow traffic rules. Decked out in cool sunglasses, the massive humanoid robots stand at busy intersections as kind of an all-in-one traffic light/crosswalk/traffic camera. The robots direct traffic with arms that signal red and green flags, and usher pedestrians safely across wide, busy roads. The humanoids were designed by Women’s Technology, an association of female and male engineers in the DRC, and, like every police robot on this list, are installed with surveillance cameras. Theirs send footage back to police in an effort to deter dangerous driving.



Poland’s Tactical Bot
Polish police recently got their hands on a new reconnaissance robot to toss around. The Tactical Throw Robot, directly translated from Taktyczny Robot Miotany or TRM, is  meant to be literally tossed into buildings or dropped from up high to scout the scene with its camera, microphone, and various illumination options. This ultradurable robot is also ultralight; weighing less than four pounds, police can throw it into second story windows without any mechanical propulsion. The device is similar to Recon Throwbot used frequently by American cops, and is designed to be outfitted with stun grenades or explosives if need, which can then be triggered by the control panel used to drive the TRM around.

Border patrol between South and North Korea
The “demilitarized” zone between South and North Korea is paradoxically one of the most militarized places in the world, including South Korea’s fleet of semi-autonomous killing machines that patrol the border day and night. Developed by Samsung, the SRG-A1 is armed with a 5.5mm machine gun and grenade launcher that can detect targets two miles away with its sensitive heat and motion sensors, as well as low-light cameras for patrolling at night. Multiple reports indicate that the SRG-1 has a fully autonomous function, too.



A Life-Saving Robot For Refugees in Greece
The coast guard in Lesvos, Greece recently started deploying a robotic life-preserver to rescue Syrian refugees making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea. Refugee’s boats are often underpowered, overloaded,  and don’t have enough life jackets. Everyday authorities scramble to  save people from boats that have capsized, run out of fuel, or wrecked in the rough waters. The robot helping them is named Emily, an acronym for  Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard, and is a project by researchers at Texas A&M University. Emily is a floatation device that zooms across the water at 20 miles per hour tethered to a 2,000 ft. rope attached to a rescue ship. Emily makes fetching people who aren’t drowning faster, leaving the human rescue team free time to rescue victims who need more help.

By April Glaser  07.24.16  7:00am

Thursday, July 21, 2016

10 mistakes executive protection agents need to stop making

Published on July 20, 2016
Jared Van Driessche

Everybody slips up sometimes. We’re only human after all. And as Hall of Fame basketball coach John Wooden pointed out, “If you’re not making mistakes, then you’re not doing anything.”

The wisdom of this statement is of course not to encourage inaction to avoid mistakes, but to learn from them.

So in the spirit of helping everyone working in executive protection get a little smarter – and thereby making the whole industry a little sharper at our game – here’s a list of the 10 mistakes we have seen executive protection agents make too many times – and can learn from.

Thinking it’s about you

We’re sorry if we’re the ones that have to break this to you, but executive protection is a service industry. It’s never about you. It’s always about the client.

It’s about providing clients with know-how, activities and circumstances that keep them safe, happy and productive. That’s what the client needs, and that’s why they pay us. Everyone has personal stuff to deal with, so deal with it personally, and don’t bring it to your client.

They don’t need to hear about your day, your life or whatever else might be eating you. Even if some monumental, life-changing event just occurred on your way to work or while you’re on coverage. Actually, they shouldn’t hear about it. Why? Because the relationship is professional, not personal. Although the client might at times spend more time with you than they do with their spouse, it’s still not about you. It’s never about you or your needs. Ouch. Deal with it or find another job.

This can be hard, we know. Life happens when you’re on coverage. Maybe a family member has just died, or you received some horrible news like your parent’s house burned to the ground. Still, when you’re on the job, you’re on the job. The friendly “How are you?” gets answered with a “Good, and you?” rather than an open sharing of what’s also running through your head. Because that could disturb the client’s mind. And it’s not about you.



Wanting to be friends with the client

This can be another hard one. It’s the most natural thing in the world to want to be friends with the people we spend time and work with, but in the case of executive protection, it’s not a good idea for either the client or you. And certainly not for your career.

First, let’s all understand that being friendly is not the same as being friends. Maintaining a positive and polite tone is one thing. Trying to establish a personal relationship with a client is something else. It’s important that you don’t move out of the lane of your role as protector. Your job description does not include asking clients for favors or business advice, or trying to get family employed. Don’t involve yourself in business that isn’t related to your business.

Agents who do this are overstepping their bounds and trying to cross a five-lane highway. Even though our clients can at times be lonely and insulated, and might themselves make friendly overtures to protective agents, it’s important to maintain a professional distance. Because sooner or later the agent is going to get hit, despite what seemed to be a good level of comfort and rapport. They are taking advantage of the client, not helping him or her.

Another problem some immature agents have is trying to get noticed and get facetime with the client. They might be a little star struck, and they would like to see the feeling reciprocated. They might try to insert themselves into the client’s life, getting too close to them or to their staff.

But folks who are public figures see this all the time, and they’re seldom enamored with people trying play the game of “I want to get close to you”. They’d rather be far away from people like that. Guess which side of this budding personal relationship is going to get nipped, and be looking for work elsewhere?

Not respecting others who work around the client

Some people need to feel more important than others and end up making trouble for themselves. Don’t be one of those guys.

This problem arises when an executive protection agent thinks the job is more significant than the work of the client’s executive assistant, estate manager, nanny, chef, house cleaner or other staff. While the agent might be good with the client, he or she isn’t necessarily so with everyone else – and treats them differently, with varying levels of respect.

What our unfortunate agent doesn’t understand is this: the woman who cleans the toilet might have a very close relationship to the family that has lasted for years. They would much rather keep the loyal cleaner than the new EP agent who acts like a jerk to her.

Don’t think you’re your irreplaceable. Anyone can be replaced, starting with ill-mannered executive protection agents. So be respectful of the role others have in the client’s staff and life – that’s a great way to earn their respect, too.



Not blending in to client’s lifestyle, company culture or personal preferences

It’s not our job to force our culture or personalities on our clients. It’s our job to fit in.

If you come off as too militaristic, you’re going to make the clients feel like prisoners in their own home. If you act like Robocop around the spouse and children, they’re unlikely to feel comfortable even though they might be safe. And even Mr. Personality might need to take a chill pill, because his perky greetings and chattiness start getting on people’s nerves.

You don’t want to come off like that weird uncle who always manages to show up at the summer garden party in a three-piece suit or the funeral in his favorite Hawaii shirt. You want to blend in, so the client never has to think “who is this guy?!”

Check out Jared’s recent blog on being a social chameleon for way more perspective on this point.

Having a big ego does not make you many amigos on the protective team

So let’s get this straight. The client is a big shot, and that makes you one, too. You’re basking in the strong light of the principal’s halo, as the detail leader no less, and your power gives you license to treat other team members poorly.

Really?

We’ve seen it happen more than once. A guy who is a capable operator rises through the ranks to assume some management responsibility. He’s very aware of his role and perceived power, and he wields it to his own advantage without worrying about how that impacts other members of the protective team. The principal doesn’t know half the story, and likes him. Until he doesn’t.

One day, the guy rubs the principal’s spouse the wrong way, and he’s on his way off the detail. The next day, he’s looking for work and everyone he treated poorly remembers him exactly for that: being a jerk. And who wants to work with a jerk?

Don’t let your career turn to toast because you let your ego do the driving when you got a bit of influence. Instead, pay it forward. Someone just starting out in the industry might be a strong player in a few years, so be sure not to burn bridges you might need later.

Playing favorites

This is another pitfall that too many agents dive right into. It’s understandable because it’s human nature to want to be liked. And it’s yet another a good example of “seemed like a good idea at the time”.

Some agents who don’t get the bigger picture think they are special, and that the client really cares for them. They don’t see anyone else with such a close relationship with the client, and this illusion soon becomes a dangerous pseudo-reality. For one thing, it probably was never true in the first place. But even if it did seem to be, it clouds your judgement and leads to nothing good. Ultimately, it will cost you your job.

Cultivating a culture of favoritism damages team readiness. It’s unhealthy for the wellbeing of the program and the principal. And it’s not a sustainable foundation for anything. The simple fact of the matter is that if you’re the favorite today, someday you won’t be. And where do you go from there? Avoid being the favorite at all costs. With our history of developing and managing EP programs we see people fall into “the favorites trap” all too often.

Favoritism starts out innocently enough and often with the best intentions. The client really likes Tim, and Tim has to do everything. That’s a win-win for a short while, but it soon turns counterproductive.

The detail rapidly becomes a logistical nightmare. Tim will burn out – he’s too close to the client and working too many hours. The rest of the team will suffer – they come off like second-class citizens. The solution is to build everyone up to Tim’s level, not to turn Tim into a fast-flaming fave.

Being a control freak

We’re all for being sticklers when it comes to security and following the SOPs designed to safeguard our principals. But we also recognize that even the best of plans sometimes get broadsided by the client, and all for good reason: whatever the client says it is.

Or doesn’t say. You see, it’s the client’s business, not ours. Business opportunities arise suddenly; someone else’s plans changed suddenly. It doesn’t matter. When we’re on the clock, we’re on client time, not ours.

This can be tough for the pack of alpha males and females who often end up in our industry. We’re used to being in control, and we plan carefully. But when you can’t control it, just embrace it. You’ll end up being less stressed, and you won’t stress the client with unnecessary interruptions designed to satisfy your schedule, not the client’s priorities.

Trying to take advantage of the client financially

You know this is wrong without us telling you, right? We hope so. And yet, the point deserves a little clarification.

Working with C-suite executives, celebrities and other high net worth clients means moving about in some very different environments than most of us are used to. One day you’re bunking at the Motel 6, the next day you’re staying at the Four Seasons. You’re used to figuring out the cost per ounce when you compare hot dogs at the supermarket, and now you’re figuring out a menu that doesn’t have prices on it, trying to decide what to have for dinner.

It’s easy to think that because the client is wealthy, money doesn’t matter and you might as well try that caviar with gold leaf. It’s also wrongheaded. Money does matter – both in terms of how others will view your judgement and integrity – and to program success.

There’s always a budget for everything. Even if you don’t know what it is, assume someone does and is ready to check your expense reports. Go ahead and order a good meal, but don’t feel sanctioned to order the absolute most expensive item on the menu. Keep a clean path. Pay for your personal items yourself. Agents who go far in this industry respect the client’s wallet and work to save their money.

Clogging up information transparency – a.k.a. lying or being selectively honest

It’s true now and it’s been true for thousands of years: Information is power, and asymmetrical access to information can give a competitive advantage or disadvantage. That’s great if you’re fighting a war, but it’s really not good if you’re working on a team together.

We’re not saying that everyone needs to know everything. But the executive protection agent who deliberately resists sharing information, reduces information transparency or spreads false information is on his or her way to career suicide.

Some inexperienced agents might have the erroneous belief that hoarding information will further their interests. They’re making a fundamental mistake. They haven’t understood that what’s good for the team is good for the principal and for themselves. We’ve seen agents try to keep executive assistants in the dark to make them look incompetent. We’ve heard of agents who say the principal’s spouse prefers this or that driver – even when that wasn’t the case – to play favorites or gain personal advantage.

People like this are worse than dishonest. If they’re willing to hijack parts of the program for their own reasons, what else are they willing to do? Their reasons are never good, and manipulating the healthy flow of useful information will always hit them in the back of the head like a boomerang.

Getting the balance wrong between tactical discipline and friendly service

Being a good executive protection agent means juggling multiple roles seamlessly and imperceptibly. We’re the tactical tough guy when we need to be. We’re the friendly concierge if that’s what’s called for. We know not to overplay either hand. And we know when to switch immediately.

There are often multiple ways to accomplish the same objective. Use your situational and social awareness to find the ideal path, striking a middle way between the many possible extremes. You want to make sure the room you’re leading the principal to is safe? Great, but you don’t need to act as if you’re clearing a house in Ramadi. Find another way that works, and doesn’t make the principal wonder what’s going on and what movie you’re in.

Similarly, it’s great to be service-minded, but not excessively friendly in all circumstances. We’re here to facilitate the principal’s smooth flow through the day and night, but we’re willing to stand up and disrupt the good vibes if that means maintaining security.



Like so many other things, it’s a balance. We wish you luck and skill in finding yours!

Let’s learn from our mistakes

The good thing about mistakes is that they’re learning opportunities: they help us to discover better ways of doing things. Once you get over the initial pain of having put your hand too close to the fire, you know better the next time and can avoid a lifetime of burnt fingers. At least you could know better.

It’s only when we continue to make the same mistakes over and over that people start calling us names. Similarly, not learning from others’ mistakes is rarely an indication of a sharp mind.

We admit that we’ve learned some of them the hard way – by putting our own hands in the flames, so to speak. Other lessons came easier, by observing colleagues and staff get burned themselves. But they’re all things we need to be aware of and get better at.