Showing posts with label military application. Show all posts
Showing posts with label military application. Show all posts

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Marines get groundbreaking, unstoppable new rifle magazine

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/01/12/marines-get-groundbreaking-unstoppable-new-rifle-magazine.html

A reliable weapon can be the difference between life and death for those serving in the military.

The Magpul Industries PMAG GEN 3 is a magazine for rifles that ensures the user stays lethal in a fight. More than 20,000 rounds fired? No problem. Still no magazine stoppages.

Why is that so important? Because every time a stoppage happens with a weapon, it means a lost opportunity to neutralize an enemy combatant. But the even bigger issue is that a stoppage can put the warfighter at risk and even lead to loss of life.

With AR, M4, and M27 weapons for example, magazine problems are a primary culprit in stoppages. But if a warfighter uses the PMAG, then the risk of stoppage is massively reduced.

The US Marine Corps has made the decision to ensure that all Marines have the best magazine available. Going forward, Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 has become the official magazine, giving Marines that extra advantage to stay alive and lethal in a firefight.

This is the first commercial magazine adopted as the official standard for the Marine Corps primary service rifle, Magpul explained.

Magpul has also introduced the PMAG GEN 3 in the “medium coyote tan” color. The black and medium coyote tan are now the only magazines authorized by the USMC for combat and training. The government-designed EPM USGI (aluminum) magazine will be used only for training purposes.



PMAG GEN 3 Basics

The PMAG GEN 3 would be ideal for the M4, M16, M27IAR (Infantry Automatic Rifle) and M249 SAW (Squad Automatic Weapon). And the magazine works with all types of bullets.

And in spite of tens of thousands of rounds, it won’t melt because of its special advanced material.

The military put the PMAG GEN 3 through years of testing, and thousands and thousands and thousands of rounds. And what did they find? No stoppages.

For example, testing found that even in 20,400 rounds of M855A1— a tricky ammo type— still there were zero stoppages.

Both the US and NATO have what’s called “rough handling” testing and Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 passed all of it with flying colors.

What does mean? It is one rugged magazine. You can use it in extreme cold— as in -60 degrees Fahrenheit cold— all the way through to 180 degrees of extreme heat, and this magazine still cannot be stopped. It is reliable.

The magazine also easily passed military testing against things like dust, UV exposure and even salt fog. You can also throw whatever dirt and grime is around and it will still outperform other magazine options.

So how does it work?

The PMAG GEN 3 loads from stripper clips. It inserts rapidly on a closed vault with a full 30 rounds. There is a smart over-insertion stop to protect against hard-core magazine changes and drops.

When you’re shooting, there is a handy window that Magpul describes as working like a gas gage. As you fire, it will provide exact data on just how many rounds you have left by a quick glance at the orange coil.



This magazine drops free, making reload very quick and efficient. There’s a dust and impact cover, but you don’t need it to store the magazine loaded. It is really there to protect against major impact like dropping the mags out of aircraft, for example.

Unlike the USGI aluminum magazine, it is very easy to disassemble to clean.

Dominating the field and winning the Marine Corps contract

In battery after battery of military testing over the course of several years, the PMAG GEN M3 relentlessly dominated the competition. In tens of thousands of rounds, there were zero magazine-related stoppages and it performed better than any other magazine. The GEN M3 was pitted against both government developed USGI and commercial mags— but none could come close to rivaling the PMAG GEN 3’s relentlessly reliable performance.

Magpul is highly motivated to find top-notch solutions for warfighters. Founder Richard Fitzpatrick was Marine Reconnaissance, many at the company served in the Corps, and have children currently serving. This is a company that understands the needs of those serving in the US military and takes delivering excellence extremely seriously.

“Firearm performance is a passion for us at Magpul, whether for military weapon systems or for civilian arms for defense and recreation,” Duane Liptak, Magpul Industries’ product management and marketing director, said. “Very early in the company history, Magpul’s founders identified shortcomings in the USGI magazine, and we’ve been dedicated to making the most reliable magazines in the world because although it may seem like a simple box with a spring, people’s lives depend heavily on this item performing.”

What’s next for Magpul? For civilians, there will be some very big reveals at SHOT Show next week. To find out first, download the latest Tactical Talk and meet a former Marine Corps fighter pilot who will give you an exclusive peek at some of the exciting news.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

US Army testing a device that could give soldiers a 'third arm'

Traditional weaponry has often been a burden to soldiers, placing added weight on their bodies, slowing reaction at times when all of their facilities are needed. Future troops may wind up having a “third arm” to help offset the weight.

The Army Research Laboratory is testing a device that attaches to ground troops’ protective vests, potentially letting Soldiers’ hands be freed up for other tasks.

NFL PLAYERS AND COMBAT VETERANS JOIN FORCES TO SAVE LIVES

"We're looking at a new way for the Soldier to interface with the weapon," Zac Wingard, a mechanical engineer for the lab's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate told the U.S. Army's website. "It is not a product; it is simply a way to study how far we can push the ballistic performance of future weapons without increasing Soldier burden."



The goal of the device would put all of the weight on a soldier’s body, allowing them to potentially have a more lethal weapon, perhaps adding as much as 20 pounds to their traditional combat load of more than 110 pounds, while not adding any burden.

"With this configuration right now, we can go up to 20 pounds and take all of that weight off of the arms," added Dan Baechle, a mechanical engineer.

The device is made out of carbon fiber composite and it can be used in the prone position on either side of a soldier’s body. It could also improve accuracy and potentially help soldiers deal with recoil, but further testing is needed.

Currently, researchers are using an M4 carbine to test the device, but other weapons, such as a M249 squad automatic weapon or M240B machine gun may also be tested.

Water harvester can pull moisture out of the air using only power of Sun

CREDIT: ALAMY  Sarah Knapton, science editor
13 APRIL 2017 • 7:00PM

Droughts could be consigned to history after scientists invented a water harvester which can pull moisture out of the air using only the power of the Sun.

The prototype, designed by scientists at MIT and the University of California, works even in desert conditions and could eventually provide households with all the drinkable water they need, simply by extracting dampness from the surrounding atmosphere.

The solar-powered harvester can provide 2.8 litres of water from the air over a 12 hour period in conditions as dry as the Mojave Desert, where the average humidity is around 20 per cent.

The prototype water harvester
The prototype water harvester  CREDIT: UC BERKLEY
Researchers say it could provide the first ‘personalised water’, taken directly from vapour in the local environment.

"This is a major breakthrough in the long-standing challenge of harvesting water from the air at low humidity," said Professor Omar Yaghi, at UC Berkeley.

"There is no other way to do that right now, except by using extra energy. Your electric dehumidifier at home 'produces' very expensive water.

"One vision for the future is to have water off-grid, where you have a device at home running on ambient solar for delivering water that satisfies the needs of a household. I call it personalised water."

The device is an open air chamber containing a lattice-like structure made from zirconium metal and adipic acid sandwiched between a solar absorption panel and a condenser plate.

Two-thirds of the world’s population experiences annual water shortages and yet an abundance of water – an estimated 13,000 trillion liters worldwide – is present in the air around us.



"This work offers a new way to harvest water from air that does not require high relative humidity conditions and is much more energy efficient than other existing technologies," said Evelyn Wang, a mechanical engineer at MIT.

The team is planning to improve the harvester so it can suck in much more air, and produce more water. But even the prototype is powerful enough to keep someone alive in desert conditions.

“We wanted to demonstrate that if you are cut off somewhere in the desert, you could survive because of this device,” said Professor Omar Yaghi.

“A person needs about a Coke can of water per day. That is something one could collect in less than an hour with this system."

The research was published in the journal Science.

DARPA Is Planning to Hack the Human Brain to Let Us “Upload” Skills

MINDHACK FOR FASTER LEARNING

In March 2016, DARPA — the U.S. military’s “mad science” branch — announced their Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT) program. The TNT program aims to explore various safe neurostimulation methods for activating synaptic plasticity, which is the brain’s ability to alter the connecting points between neurons — a requirement for learning. DARPA hopes that building up that ability by subjecting the nervous system to a kind of workout regimen will enable the brain to learn more quickly.

[Taken]Military Researchers Are Hacking the Human Brain So We Can Learn Much Faster
Credit: DARPA

The ideal end benefit for this kind of breakthrough would be downloadable learning. Rather than needing to learn, for example, a new language through rigorous study and practice over a long period of time, we could basically “download” the knowledge after putting our minds into a highly receptive, neuroplastic state. Clearly, this kind of research would benefit anyone, but urgent military missions can succeed or fail based on the timing. In those situations, a faster way to train personnel would be a tremendous boon.

FIRST NEUROSTIMULATION, THEN APPLICATION

As part of the TNT program, DARPA is funding eight projects at seven institutions. All projects are part of a coordinated effort that will first study the fundamental science undergirding brain plasticity and will conclude with human trials. The first portion of the TNT program will work to unravel the neural mechanisms that allow nerve stimulation to influence brain plasticity. The second portion of the program will practically apply what has been learned in a variety of training exercises.



To ensure the work stays practical, foreign language specialists, intelligence analysts, and others who train personnel now will work with researchers to help refine the TNT platform to suit military training needs. Researchers will compare the efficacy of using an implanted device to stimulate the brain versus non-invasive stimulation. They will also explore both the ethics of enhanced learning through neurostimulation and ways to avoid side effects and potential risks.

“The Defense Department operates in a complex, interconnected world in which human skills such as communication and analysis are vital, and the Department has long pushed the frontiers of training to maximize those skills,” Doug Weber, the TNT Program Manager, said in a DARPA press release. “DARPA’s goal with TNT is to further enhance the most effective existing training methods so the men and women of our Armed Forces can operate at their full potential.”

If the TNT program succeeds, striving to be all you can be may mean learning at a much faster pace, and not just for military personnel. Downloadable learning may be one of the ways we achieve next-level humanity.

References: Darpa, Darpa

 
https://futurism.com/?p=81137&post_type=post

Fake Navy SEAL gets 4 years in prison

By Jeanette Steele Contact Reporter

A 68-year-old Wisconsin man who falsely claimed to be a Navy SEAL wounded four times in Vietnam has been sentenced to four years in prison for theft and faking paperwork.

U.S. prosecutors say Kenneth E. Jozwiak produced fake discharge paperwork in 2014 to get U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs pension benefits intended for low-income wartime veterans.




In 2014, Jozwiak submitted a discharge certificate that claimed he served as a Navy SEAL from 1965 to 1968 and was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

All -- including the four Purple Hearts for combat injuries — were totally false, according to the U.S. Attorney's office for the northern district of Ohio.

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/military/the-intel/sd-me-seal-stolenvalor-20170523-story.html



Thursday, March 30, 2017

Trump Wall May Reinforce Shift to Maritime Migrant Routes

Written by Tristan Clavel  Tuesday, 28 March 2017
US/Mexico Border Human Smuggling



Central American undocumented migrants are shifting to maritime transportation, according to a recent report, likely as a result of Mexico's crackdown on land routes, a trend that would likely increase should the US-Mexico border wall be extended.

An investigative report by El País shows that Central American migrants are increasingly boarding small boats to travel from Guatemala's Ocós coastal municipality to the Mazatán municipality in the Mexican state of Chiapas.

Smugglers charge between $400 and $800 per migrant, according to the Spanish news media. Some migrants are opting to make this six to eight hour journey rather than attempt to cross the border between Mexico and Guatemala, an area which has become much more of a focus for Mexican law enforcement cracking down on undocumented migrants.

Every day, Ocós witnesses three or four vessels carrying around 15 to 20 migrants along this maritime route, according to a local official interviewed by El País. This route has traditionally been used by the Mexican trafficking group los Zetas to smuggle drugs, which has now reportedly diversified its portfolio with human smuggling.

Meanwhile, on March 13, 60 US senators signed an open letter warning of the potential adverse consequences of the preliminary 2018 budget proposal for maritime interdiction efforts. The proposed budget made no mention of the coast guard, according to the New York Times, but it nonetheless spurred fears of budget cuts for the coast guard in order to help strengthen security along the US-Mexico border and build a wall.

InSight Crime Analysis
Following the 2014 humanitarian crisis caused by the arrival of tens of thousands of undocumented children to the US-Mexico border, Mexico began cracking down on migrants travelling north through its territory, in large part due to pressure from the US. As a result, security was reinforced along its extremely porous southern border with Guatemala. Along with creating adverse consequences for the safety of migrants targeted by organized crime, the crackdown may well have led migrants to adapt and turn to maritime routes, as reported by El País.

SEE ALSO: Coverage of Human Smuggling
Should President Donald Trump's now infamous wall be built, the same trend could repeat itself along Mexico's border with the United States. There is little reason to believe that criminal groups would not open drug trafficking maritime routes from Mexico to the United States to human smuggling, given the criminal profits to be made, or that migrants would not adapt and increasingly turn to maritime routes.

Moreover, this trend would likely be reinforced by cuts to the US Coast Guard's budget to help finance the construction of the wall. According to the New York Times, the Coast Guard stopped more than 6,000 undocumented migrants and seized 200 metric tons of cocaine during the 2016 fiscal year. The open letter from the US Senators referenced above says that the US Coast Guard intercepts more cocaine at sea than what is seized at ports of entry and amongst all other elements of domestic law enformcement combined.

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How 'invisible armor' could defeat bullets and blades

Ever wonder if there was such a thing as transparent armor? It sounds like something straight out of a comic book, but it's something the Navy has actually created.

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scientists have created a remarkable transparent armor that is lightweight and still provides excellent protection.

Nearly as transparent as glass, the armor is essentially invisible protection from bullets. And if the armor surface is damaged, warfighters could fix it on the fly with something as simple as a hot plate and the armor will meld itself back together.

Think about how “bulletproof glass” (a misnomer since it is often only bullet resistant) works – you can see through it and it stops bullets.

Now what if you could do that for body armor and helmets? That’s the idea here.



This next-generation armor advance could also amp up transparent bulletproof walls to protect tourist attractions from the attacks we’ve seen in Paris and most recently, in London.

What’s the armor made of?

The transparent polymer armor gets its transparency from something known as tiny crystalline domains. The armor itself is made up of alternating layers of elastomeric polymer combined with a harder material substrate.

NRL scientists conducted tests using polymeric materials as a coating to try to enhance impact resistance.

By applying layers of the special materials to body armor and helmets, the result was better protection for warriors against bullets.

The armor also helped reduce the impact of blast waves caused by something like an IED explosion, which could potentially help prevent brain trauma.

When a bullet hits the armor

If you picture a windshield that has been struck by a rock kicked up while driving, the rock’s impact may cause damage that makes it difficult to see through the windshield.

One of the amazing things about this see-through armor is that when it's struck by a projectile, such as a bullet, it still retains its lucid nature. There’s virtually no impact on visibility and the damage is limited only to the spot where the bullet connected with the armor.

Repair vs. replace

The possibility exists that this futuristic body armor could be ironed back into shape after it sustained some hits, because of the material used to create it.

The material needs to be heated to around 100 degrees Celsius, which then causes it to become hot enough to melt the tiny crystallites. By heating the material, any impact from the bullet can be melded back together and returned to its normal state. Scientists believe that this sort of repair will not impact how the armor performs.

THIS FOAM STOPS BULLETS COLD AND PULVERIZES THEM TO DUST

Easy, fast repairs can be a great advantage for warfighters operating in remote locations and it can save money by repairing rather than replacing.

Implications for protecting against global terror attacks

In a scenario like the recent London attack, lightweight body armor approaches like the aforementioned can be very useful to protect armed officers from bladed weapons, bullets and other threats while the reduced weight can improve their speed, agility and flexibility of response.

Like the Capitol building in the US, armed officers protect the building and those working in and visiting the building. Based on the information provided publicly thus far, the terrorist wielded a bladed weapon and attacked British officers. One officer was tragically killed.

Guns and explosive devices are not the only methods of attack used by Islamic extremist terrorists. In Europe, terrorist plots and attacks have increasingly involved bladed weapons on foot as well the weaponization of vehicles.

Islamic extremist groups such as al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and the Islamic State group have been actively promoting these sorts of attack methods.

Just last month in Paris, a terrorist tried to launch an attack with machetes at the popular tourist site of the Louvre museum. A French soldier stopped him before there were any casualties.

In 2013, two terrorists drove at British Army soldier Fusilier Lee Rigby, who was walking a street in England. The terrorists then exited the vehicle, attacked him with blades and murdered him by hacking him to death.

Invisible Walls?

Ultimately, advances like NRLs in transparent armor could play a vital role in amping up “invisible” walls could be used to stop both people and vehicles from storming sites and areas. By enhancing protection, it could help prevent attacks and casualties.

Paris recently announced they are building an eight-foot bulletproof glass wall around the Eiffel Tower. Why? Tourist sites are attractive targets for terrorists. The goal is to stop not just bullets but prevent vehicles loaded with bombs from gaining access.

Transparent armor-ed up walls mean tourists can still enjoy an uninterrupted view while benefiting from enhanced protection.

Advanced armor like this can also become a deterrent to future attacks.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Origami inspired shield might save police officer's lives

Posted by Jessica Romero

A mechanical engineer professor took on the problem of police protection and he might have found a great solution. He and his team drew inspiration from an unlikely source: origami.

The shield can be compactly folded and easily transported. It consists of thin sheets of Kevlar and is about as heavy as a large suitcase. Even though it is compact it expands in five seconds which allows it to be used in unexpected dangerous situations.

The designer also pictured it being used to protect children and other people in dangerous situations where there is no cover.

According to Daily Mail:

Design is made up of 12 layers of bulletproof Kevlar.

Weighs only 55 pounds (25 kilograms). Many of the steel shields currently used approach 100 pounds (45 kilograms).

It uses a Yoshimura origami crease pattern to expand around an officer, providing protection on the side in addition to protecting them in the front.

When expanded — which takes only five seconds — it can provide cover for officers and stop bullets from several types of handguns.

In testing, the barrier successfully stopped bullets from smaller 9 mm pistols, all the way up to .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum 'hand cannons'.

Read more: http://kfiam640.iheart.com/onair/tim-conway-jr-33371/origami-inspired-shield-might-save-police-15574462/#ixzz4buad5gz8

This foam stops bullets cold and pulverizes them to dust

Foam body armor? Even armor-piercing bullets cannot get through this foam.

And the foam doesn’t just stop bullets. It destroys them…this foam decimates bullets into dust.

North Carolina State University Professor Afsaneh Rabiei led the team that created the amazing foam.  This is not ordinary foam like the kind used for shaving, for example. This is a special type of foam called composite metal foams, or CMF.  The military and law enforcement could use this kind of foam for advanced, ultra light body armor to protect personnel.

And this research team has other foams up its sleeve that have the potential to keep military and first responders safe from radiation and extreme heat too.

BULLET V. FOAM



Sound impossible that foam-based armor could stop armor piercing rounds? Testing has proved it is indeed possible.  In tests conducted by the development team, the foam body armor was able to defeat an armor-piercing bullet. And on impact, their foam smashed the bullet into powder.

 To challenge the foam material with bullets, the team built a shield. The strike face - the side facing the weapon - was made with the new composite metal foam together with boron carbide ceramics. The backplates – the side that would face the user - were made of Kevlar.

In tests, the team shot at the foam body armor with 7.62 x 63 mm M2 armor-piercing round.

How well did it work?

Their foam absorbed the bullet’s kinetic energy.

The foam worked so well that an armor-piercing round could only penetrate less than an inch on the weapon-facing side of the shield.

On the side facing the warfighter’s body, the bullet was only able to cause an 8 mm indentation on the back .

Body armor innovation is important because it can save lives.

The National Institute of Justice standard allows up to 44 mm indentation from a bullet on side facing the user– so the foam performs  80 percent better than the maximum standard.

HOW IS IT MADE?

In basic terms, the foam is a composite metal foam. What does that mean?

THE 5 COOLEST MILITARY INNOVATIONS OF 2016

To make it, the team takes molten metal and bubbles gas through it. This process creates a sort of froth. When the froth cools, it becomes a lightweight, ultra strong matrix material.

Processes like 3D printing and milling can also be used to make composite metal foam.

The team first produced a foam shield that could block radiation.

This foam is able to stop and block X-rays. In tests, it can even protect against various forms of gamma rays.  According to NASA, gamma rays are produced by the hottest and most energetic objects in the universe like supernova explosions and areas around black holes. Here on Earth, they can also be produced in nuclear fission.  In tests, the foam could also protect against neutron radiation that can be produced by nuclear fission or fusion.  To develop radiation shielding, the team created a “high-Z steel-steel foam”. This one is a combination of stainless steel with a small amount of tungsten shaped into hollow spheres. This is then introduced into the steel matrix and creates the foam.

Current protection options tend to be very cumbersome, awkward and heavy. The foam shielding could provide a lightweight, strong alternative for the military. It could also have potential for transportation and storage of hazardous materials.

Space exploration and transportation of nuclear waste are just two other examples of how this foam could be used.

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy supported the team’s development of foam that is two times better at protecting against fire and heat as regular metal.

For example, their lightweight stainless steel foam was far more effective than stainless steel.

To examine the foam’s heat protection, the team tested some of the foam that was 0.75 inches thick against 800 degrees Celsius fire for 30 minutes. And they tested a regular piece of stainless steel the same size and width against the same heat.

Which resisted the heat better? The foam. The foam withstood the heat twice as long.

It took four minutes for the extreme heat to reach the other side of the regular stainless steel from the fire. The team’s foam withstood the heat for eight minutes before it reached the other end.

Being able to withstand heat longer could provide a number of advantages. For example, it could mean the difference between an accident causing an explosion – or not.

Foam like this could also be leveraged by the military to safely transport and store explosives. It could even be used for the safekeeping and transfer of nuclear and other hazardous materials.

Go inside dangerous missions and hear firsthand from American Special Operations warriors about how they have used advanced body armor in combat on Tactical Talk.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

Paris shooting: terror investigation launched after suspect shot dead

Man identified by security official as Ziyed Ben Belgacem was killed hours after he shot and injured a policeman north of Paris

French anti-terror officials have launched an investigation after a man known to the security services shot at a police officer in northern Paris before travelling across the city to Orly airport, where he was killed following an altercation with another officer.

The attacker was said to be a radicalised Muslim who appeared on a security watchlist, police sources told Reuters. France’s anti-terrorism prosecutor later confirmed that an inquiry had been opened into the incident on Saturday morning.

The suspect was identified by a security official as Ziyed Ben Belgacem, a 39-year-old born in France, the Associated Press reported.

Prosecutors said the suspect’s house was among scores searched in November 2015 in the immediate aftermath of terror attacks in Paris in which 130 people were killed. Those searches targeted people with suspected radical leanings.

The suspect’s father and brother were detained by police for questioning on Saturday.

The French president, François Hollande, said the investigation would determine whether the Orly attacker “had a terrorist plot behind him”.

The French defence minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, said the attacker had assaulted a patrol of three air force soldiers, one of whom was a woman.

The attacker wrestled her to the floor and tried to take her weapon, but she was able to keep hold of it. The two other soldiers then opened fire to protect her and passengers in the airport, he said.

 A trolley stretcher is wheeled into Orly airport southern terminal after the shooting.
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 A stretcher is wheeled into Orly airport’s southern terminal after the shooting. Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters
The air force personnel were deployed as part of Sentinelle, a military operation launched in January 2015 after the Paris terrorist attacks to support the police and protect sensitive sites.

The interior minister, Bruno Le Roux, said the man shot dead at the airport was linked with a car-jacking incident earlier on Saturday in a northern suburb of Paris. He said the man had shot at a female police officer after being stopped for speeding before fleeing the scene and stealing a car at gunpoint.

Le Roux said the officer had not been badly injured.


No explosive devices were found on the dead man’s body, an interior ministry spokesman said.

About 3,000 people were evacuated from both terminals at Orly and all flights were suspended, with some diverted to Charles de Gaulle airport. Some flights began operating again early Saturday afternoon. No one else was injured in the Orly incident.

 Passengers wait among emergency vehicles at Orly airport.
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 Passengers wait among emergency vehicles at Orly airport. Photograph: Benoit Tessier/Reuters
The airport shooting follows after a similar incident last month at the Louvre museum in central Paris.

France remains under a state of emergency in the wake of the attack on the Bataclan music venue in November 2015 in which jihadi gunmen killed 90 people, and the Nice truck attack last July that claimed the lives of 84 people and injured hundreds more.

On a visit to Paris on Saturday the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met survivors of the Bataclan attack, praising their bravery and the “amazing progress” of their recovery.

The royal couple met a 25-year-old, known only as Jessica, who was shot seven times in the leg, hip and back as she dined with friends at La Belle Equipe restaurant, and Kevin, 28, a Bataclan concert-goer shot in the leg.

The couple visited the hospital where the pair have been treated as reports of the incident at Orly airport emerged. A Kensington Palace spokesman said the royal visit was unaffected.

This article was corrected on 19 March 2017. Sentinelle is an operation, not an elite special forces group as suggested earlier.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

The New American Strategy Should Be Disengagement In The World

In the never ending war against dictators, terrorism, it off-shoots and splinter groups, the United States is expected by every western government to lead the charge and carry the battle standards for conflicts against every dangerous ideologue in the world.

Since WWII the United States has been directly responsible for between 10 to 15 million war deaths in the Korean, Vietnam, Iraq Wars (2) as well as fatalities in Cambodia and Laos. The U.S. Government by proxy wars have been responsible for another 9-14 million deaths in Afghanistan, Angola, The DRC, East Timor, Guatemala, Indonesia, Pakistan and Sudan, which brings our countries total death by conflict since WWII to somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 – 30 million deaths from wars scattered around the world.



Now some of these conflicts have been fought for the greater good, and some not so much so, but at what point does war and death become a lost cause in itself?  Isn’t 20-30 millions deaths enough for us to say, let Europe and the rest of the world “lead from the front ” on wars, police actions, military engagements, short tactical operations and the fallout of both?

I for one don’t consider it a weakness for the U.S. to disengage from each and every conflict that modern man has become engaged in, only to have our best and brightest killed off for an uncertain peace time and time again.  The warrior culture is alive and well in America and we all would all be better served to place limits on how many generations of our youth we want engaged in perpetual war.



As a former member of the U.S. Military who entered service in 1987, I was on active duty for the overthrow of Panamanian dictator Noriega in 1989, the 1991 Gulf War, the 1993 Somalia incursion and the Bosnian conflict of 1994.  As a police officer in Los Angeles from 1994 to 2006, I was often on the other end of the tactics employed in war, used against me in the inner cities, by those who had gone to war and come home to become home grown terrorist’s as gang members. And most recently I have worked in the capacity of a security contractor in the middle east providing security for diplomats and other NGO’s throughout the region, so I understand all of the nuances that leave the Middle East a fertile ground for combat and strife, and I for one do not believe that modern man has the capacity to solve religious disputes that have evolved over thousands of years.



The world has been engaged in Middle East peace talks since 1949, with no concrete solutions in sight and until the people in those regions began to have dialogue on a human level, you can expect the bloodshed to continue on a daily basis, and the power brokers in the region need to install the peace NOT the United States, because we cannot, and yes even with all of our military might we cannot.

I have heard all the rhetoric for war from my enlistment in 1987 until today and it continues to be the same, it is usually the ” US vs THEM ” mantra, which works well on the highly uninformed and war hawks, yeah those war hawks in our government that will not send their own children off to fight for the latest war cause that they believe in so highly.



I absolutely believe in defense of our country, but only for the imminent, immediate protection of the American people on American soil, and I no longer believe we should have the protective buffer of American boots on the ground around the world, for the peace and security of Europe, The Middle East, Asia or the African Continent, even with overwhelming support from any government that wants our government to engage in combat operations.  If other countries believe that their peace and stability is threatened by a wolf at the door, then let those countries arm, outfit and send their young men and women off to war to defend it’s way of life.  We can and should honor our diplomatic agreement’s to aid our allies in a time of war, but we as Americans cannot continue to police the world, because the latest splinter group with the newest scary name pops up and says “boo”.

Yes we have to deal with the extremism that continues to plot attacks against our homeland, and we have the most capable special forces operators in the world to do that, on a surgical strike case by case basis. However the large scale company and division size combat operations should be a thing of the past for the U.S. unless we have a nation on our shores intent on immediate invasion of our homeland.

A little bit of isolationism at this point in human history is probably just what the doctor has ordered.

i·so·la·tion·ism (ˌīsəˈlāSHəˌnizəm/Submit ) (noun) : a policy of remaining apart from the affairs or interests of other groups, especially the political affairs of other countries.

So before the comments began, lets get a few things straight.

I am not a coward, I am a patriot.
I am not afraid of combat, I have served.
I am not an appeaser, I believe you kill before being killed.
I am not shortsighted, I understand nuance.
I am an American.

Written By:
Warren Pulley, CEO
RyPul Threat Assessments
An International Protection and Assessment Company

Monday, August 29, 2016

DoD Taps DEF CON Hacker Traits For Cybersecurity Training Program

Famed capture-the-packet contest technology will become part of DoD training as well.

The Defense Department for the second year in a row sent one of its top directors to DEF CON in Las Vegas this month, but it wasn’t for recruiting purposes.

So what was Frank DiGiovanni, director of force training in DoD’s Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness, doing at DEF CON? “My purpose was to really learn from people who come to DEF CON … Who are they? How do I understand who they are? What motivates them? What sort of attributes” are valuable to the field, the former Air Force officer and pilot who heads overall training policy for the military, says.

DiGiovanni interviewed more than 20 different security industry experts and executives during DEF CON. His main question:  “If you’re going to hire someone to either replace you or eventually be your next cyber Jedi, what are you looking for?”



The DEF CON research is part of DiGiovanni’s mission to develop a state-of-the-art cyber training program that ultimately helps staff the military as well as private industry with the best possible cybersecurity experts and to fill the infamous cybersecurity skills gap today. The program likely will employ a sort of ROTC-style model where DoD trains the students and they then owe the military a certain number of years of employment.

With the help of DEF CON founder Jeff Moss, DiGiovanni over the the past year has met and then picked the brains of, seasoned hackers and the people who hire them about the types of skills, characteristics, and know-how needed for defending organizations from today’s attackers.

DiGiovanni, who is also responsible for helping shape retention and recruitment policy efforts in the DoD, has chatted with CEOs of firms that conduct penetration testing, as well as pen testers and other security experts themselves, to get a clearer picture of the types of skills DoD should be teaching, testing, and encouraging, for future cybersecurity warriors and civilians.

This is the second phase of the development of a prototype cyber training course he spearheads for DoD at Fort McNair: the intensive six-month prototype program currently consists of 30 students from all branches of the military as well as from the US Department of Homeland Security. It’s all about training a new generation of cybersecurity experts.

The big takeaway from DiGiovanni’s DEF CON research: STEM, aka science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, was not one of the top skills organizations look for in their cyber-Jedis. “Almost no one talked about technical capabilities or technical chops,” he says. “That was the biggest revelation for me.”

DiGiovanni compiled a list of attributes for the cyber-Jedi archetype based on his interviews. The ultimate hacker/security expert, he found, has skillsets such as creativity and curiosity, resourcefulness, persistence, and teamwork, for example.

A training exercise spinoff of DEF CON’s famed capture-the-packet (CTP) contest also will become part of the DoD training program. DiGiovanni recruited DEF CON CTP and Wall of Sheep mastermind Brian Markus to repurpose his capture-the-packet technology as a training exercise module. “In October, he will submit to the government a repackaged capture-the-packet training capability for DoD, which is huge,” DiGiovanni says. Also on tap is a capture-the-flag competition, DoD-style, he says.

One of the security experts DiGiovanni met with at DEF CON this year was Patrick Upatham, global director of advanced cybersecurity at Digital Guardian. “I was a little apprehensive at first,” Upatham says. “After learning what they are doing and the approach that they are taking, it totally made sense.”

“He [Frank] is looking for a completely different mindset and background, and [to] then train that person with the technical detail” to do the job, Upatham says. “They are looking for folks who are more resourceful and persistent, and creative in their mindset.”

DoD’s training program is about being more proactive in building out its cybersecurity workforce. That’s how it has to work now, given that more than 200,000 cybersecurity jobs were left unfilled last year overall. DoD’s Cyber Mission Force is calling for some 6,200 positions to be filled.

The goal is to train that workforce in both offensive and defensive security skills. That means drilling down on the appropriate problem-based learning, for example. The current prototype training program doesn’t require a four-year degree, and it’s more of a “journeyman apprentice” learning model, DiGiovanni says.

About 80% or so is hands-on keyboard training, he says, with the rest is lecture-based. “A lot of the lectures are by the students themselves, with a learn-by-teaching model,” he says.

DiGiovanni gave an example of one student in the DoD training program who came in knowing nothing about security. The young man was a self-professed  “cable dog” at Fort Meade, a reference to his job of pulling cable through pipes. But when he finished the six-month DoD course, he was reverse-engineering malware.

“When he came to the course, he didn’t know what a ‘right-click’” of a mouse was, nor did he have any software technology experience, DiGiovanni recalls. “To me, that’s a heck of a success story.”

The next step is determining how to scale the DoD training program so that it can attract and train enough cyber warriors for the future. The goal is to hand off the training program to a partner organization to run it and carry it forward, possibly as early as this fall, he says.

Meantime, DiGiovanni says the DEF CON hacker community is a key resource and potential partner. “The security of our nation is at stake. I think it’s imperative for DoD to embrace the DEF CON community because of the unique skill they bring to the table,” he says. “They want to serve and contribute, and the nation needs them.”

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Inside Gaza's Underground Smuggler Tunnels

By VICE Staff
August 17, 2016

In VICELAND's new series Black Market: Dispatches, we expand our look into global underground economies to see how contraband moves across borders.
In the first episode, we explore the underground network of tunnels that connect the Gaza Strip to Israel and Egypt to see how goods and soldiers move in and out of the Palestinian territory. Gazans get around the economic blockade by using the rudimental tunnels to smuggle in items they need to survive, even as neighboring territories try to bomb and destroy them.
Watch the full first episode above and make sure to catch the show every Tuesday at 10 PM on VICELAND.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World

LAW ENFORCEMENT ACROSS the globe use semi-autonomous technology to do what humans find too dangerous, boring, or just can’t. This week, the Cleveland Police had a few nonlethal ones on hand at the Republican National Convention. But even those can be outfitted to kill, as we saw in Dallas earlier this month when police strapped a bomb to an explosive-detonation robot, and boom: a non-lethal robot became a killer. If that thought scares you, you’re not alone. Human rights activists worry these robots lack social awareness crucial to decision-making. “For example, during mass protests in Egypt in January 2011 the army refused to fire on protesters, an action that required innate human compassion and respect for the rule of law,” said Rasha Abdul Rahim of Amnesty International in a statement last year arguing that the UN should ban killer robots. More than a thousand robotics experts, including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, signed a letter last summer warning against machines that can select targets without human control. We wanted to find out just how many of these things are in use around the world. But law enforcement isn’t exactly forthcoming about the topic, so this list is not exhaustive. Here’s what we found.




With the Republican National Convention underway, Cleveland police have enlisted the help of a new robot named Griffin, built by students from the local community college. Standing only 12 inches tall, the six-wheeled rover is designed to go places police can’t fit, like under a car or behind dumpsters to look for explosives. Griffin is equipped with a camera and light, which allows police to scope out the situation from a monitor at a safe distance. Unlike the larger bomb squad and military grade robots, like the one police strapped an explosive to in Dallas, Griffin is light enough to be deployed quickly without needing to be hauled out in a big truck. And it’s one of many robots Ohio police have on hand. Public records requests show Ohio law enforcement have received 40 robots from the federal 1033 program that transfers military equipment to local law enforcement.

India’s Riot-Control Drones
Police in the Uttar Pradesh region of India last year purchased a set of Skunk drones built to shower crowds with pepper spray and paintballs. The drone, manufactured by South African firm Desert Wolf, can hover mid-air over a protest and fire up to 20 paintballs (or other “non-lethal” ammunition) per second while simultaneously dispersing tear gas pellets onto people. Police control the drone from the ground, which levitates via eight motors that each power a 16-inch propeller. It’s outfitted with onboard speakers so authorities can communicate with crowds, as well as bright strobe lights and “eye safe” lasers to disorient and disperse a gathering. And of course, no drone is complete without surveillance capability. The Skunk comes packed with a thermal camera, an HD camera, and an onboard microphone, you know, to give the cops something to watch later.

South Korea's Prison Robo-Guards
Correctional officers at Pohang prison in South Korea had robot to help keep watch for them, during a trial in 2012.  Standing 5-feet tall, the Robo-Guard is equipped with 3D cameras and software to recognize inmate behavior. The robot’s makers say it’s able to report when something seems abnormal, like if there’s a fight or an inmate on the floor. The human in the control center can communicate with prisoners via the robot’s two-way radios. It’s unclear whether the robots were put into full-time use in South Korea after the tests, though recent reports indicate South Korea is now building robo-guards to keep patrol during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Isreal's Deadly Rover
This 26-pound, eleven 11-inch-tall robot is packing a 9mm Glock pistol. Designed by Israeli firm General Robotics Ltd with help from the Israeli Police Counter Terrorism Unit, the Dogo can fire up to five rounds in two seconds. This small land rover can enter a house quietly, climb stairs, and even maneuver over obstacles. Ready with eight cameras and two-way audio, the Dogo allows police to communicate with  and fire upon suspects without risking their lives, according to the company’s website.  If law enforcement aren’t looking to kill, the Dogo can also carry pepper spray or a dazzling light module to cause temporary blindness.

LAPD’s Huge Smasher
The Bat Cat—shorthand for Bomb Assault Tactical Control Assessment Tool—is the Los Angeles Police Department’s radio-controlled monster. Designed to pick up a car bomb with its massive, 50-foot telescoping arm, this unmanned ground vehicle reaches top speed at six miles per hour. While it might have been designed to remove massive explosives, the Bat Cat can also rip through a house in minutes, according to The Los Angeles Times,which reported that the LAPD used it to tear down the walls of a home during a standoff in 2011. Cops can switch out the end of the telescoping arm with a claw, a bucket, a forklift, or battering rams, and it can handle a payload of around 12,000 pounds, more than enough to haul your typical car bomb far from harm’s way. The Bat Cat was constructed on the chassis of a Caterpillar Telehandler, so it’s basically just pimped out remote-controlled forklift. Still, best to keep your distance.

Japan's Drone-Catching Drone
This is meta. Japanese police are using drones to take down drones, but they’re not shooting them. That would cause debris. Instead police are using a net. Japanese police introduced a net-wielding drone fleet earlier this year to catch suspicious looking small unmanned aircrafts that fly over sensitive government locations like butterflies. It takes a giant net to catch a drone, and the police fleet is equipped with a 6.5-foot-by-10-foot lattice. Last, year, the BBC reported that police deployed the net drones  in response to a drone carrying a non-harmful amount of radioactive sand that landed on the roof of the Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s house—a stunt that turned out to be a protest by an anti-nuclear activist. Japan’s drone-catching drone certainly seems a lot safer than the Dutch National Police Force’s solution—they trained eagles to take down unauthorized drones.

Brazil’s Olympic Peacekeepers
The Olympics are in less than a month, and Motherboard reports that Brazilian police forces are pulling out all the stops, including calling on a number of model 510 PackBots that were originally acquired in preparation for the World Cup, a military grade bomb detection and reconnaissance robot that was used after the Fukushima meltdown in Japan and was deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Each PackBot 510 weighs around 65 pounds and carries with it four cameras, as well as its main feature, a 6-foot telescoping arm that can lift a 30-pound payload. PackBots are primarily deployed for bomb detection and disposal; it can even use mechanical wire cutters attached to the end of its arm. The PackBot climbs stairs, maneuvers in water, and can crawl around at about 6 miles per hour, faster than most adults jog. With millions of people coming to town for the Olympics, Brazilian police will use the technology to inspect suspicious packages.

Democratic Republic of Congo's Traffic Robocops
In Kinshasa, the sprawling capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo,  The Guardian reports that city officials installed a handful of giant solar-powered robot traffic cops in 2013 in an effort to reduce deaths and get more people to follow traffic rules. Decked out in cool sunglasses, the massive humanoid robots stand at busy intersections as kind of an all-in-one traffic light/crosswalk/traffic camera. The robots direct traffic with arms that signal red and green flags, and usher pedestrians safely across wide, busy roads. The humanoids were designed by Women’s Technology, an association of female and male engineers in the DRC, and, like every police robot on this list, are installed with surveillance cameras. Theirs send footage back to police in an effort to deter dangerous driving.



Poland’s Tactical Bot
Polish police recently got their hands on a new reconnaissance robot to toss around. The Tactical Throw Robot, directly translated from Taktyczny Robot Miotany or TRM, is  meant to be literally tossed into buildings or dropped from up high to scout the scene with its camera, microphone, and various illumination options. This ultradurable robot is also ultralight; weighing less than four pounds, police can throw it into second story windows without any mechanical propulsion. The device is similar to Recon Throwbot used frequently by American cops, and is designed to be outfitted with stun grenades or explosives if need, which can then be triggered by the control panel used to drive the TRM around.

Border patrol between South and North Korea
The “demilitarized” zone between South and North Korea is paradoxically one of the most militarized places in the world, including South Korea’s fleet of semi-autonomous killing machines that patrol the border day and night. Developed by Samsung, the SRG-A1 is armed with a 5.5mm machine gun and grenade launcher that can detect targets two miles away with its sensitive heat and motion sensors, as well as low-light cameras for patrolling at night. Multiple reports indicate that the SRG-1 has a fully autonomous function, too.



A Life-Saving Robot For Refugees in Greece
The coast guard in Lesvos, Greece recently started deploying a robotic life-preserver to rescue Syrian refugees making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea. Refugee’s boats are often underpowered, overloaded,  and don’t have enough life jackets. Everyday authorities scramble to  save people from boats that have capsized, run out of fuel, or wrecked in the rough waters. The robot helping them is named Emily, an acronym for  Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard, and is a project by researchers at Texas A&M University. Emily is a floatation device that zooms across the water at 20 miles per hour tethered to a 2,000 ft. rope attached to a rescue ship. Emily makes fetching people who aren’t drowning faster, leaving the human rescue team free time to rescue victims who need more help.

By April Glaser  07.24.16  7:00am

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

US Navy develops 'Iron Man'-style AR diving helmet

Engineers at the US Naval Surface Warfare Center in Panama City, Florida, are developing a new diving helmet so futuristic it might seem straight out of Iron Man.

The team, led by Underwater Systems Development Project Engineer Dennis Gallagher, took inspiration from Tony Stark and put a high-resolution, see-through head-up display (HUD) directly inside a diving helmet. Dubbed the Divers Augmented Vision Display (DAVD), the system lets divers view in real time "everything from sector sonar [showing their location in relation to the dive site], text messages, diagrams, photographs, and even augmented reality videos" right inside their helmet.

Having this information within eyeshot offers divers a number of benefits, the team said. For starters, it can increase safety for divers out on missions, providing greater situational awareness and more accurate navigation to a target such as a ship, downed aircraft, or another object of interest. Plus, instead of having to rely on pre-dive briefings alone to determine what they're looking for, how items should appear, and where they're located, the system places this information right in front of their face. Inside the helmet, this information looks like a point-of-view video game display.



"By building this HUD directly inside the dive helmet instead of attaching a display on the outside, it can provide a capability similar to something from an Iron Man movie," Gallagher said in a statement. "You have everything you visually need right there within the helmet."

The system could be used for all types of diving missions, including underwater construction, salvage operations, and ship repair. Eventually, it could also potentially be used by first responders and commercial divers.

The Navy is also in the process of developing enhanced sensors that will let divers see underwater in higher-resolution, even when visibility is "near zero." In the future, this enhanced underwater vision system could be fed directly into the DAVD.

The team expects to start testing the DAVD in October.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Soldiers bleeding stopped with Injectable sponges for the first time from combat gunshot wound

Re: Posted by RyPul Threat Assessments

Firepower: Can these sponges save lives in under 20 seconds?

A U.S. military surgical team used an innovative device to staunch the bleeding on a gunshot victim, RevMedx, the company that makes it, recently announced. That marks the first documented occasion that the device has been used in a patient clinically, the company said.

The XSTAT, as the device is called, works by injecting numerous small sponges into a wound, which quickly expand and stop the bleeding. It takes just 20 seconds after contacting blood for the sponges to expand and staunch the bleeding, the company says, and they have markers in them to make them visible under x-ray, so that they can all eventually be removed.



The patient, a soldier, was reportedly shot in the left thigh, resulting in a “sizable cavity” in the leg. A forward surgical team struggled over the course of a surgery that lasted about seven hours to control all the bleeding, and decided to use the XSTAT. After they did, it stopped the bleeding almost right away, the company reported, and the patient— who had received both blood and plasma transfusions— stabilized.

"The first-in-human experience with XSTAT is the culmination of tremendous effort on the part of both RevMedx and our military collaborators," Andrew Barofsky, the president of RevMedx, said in a statement. "We are pleased to see XSTAT play a critical role in saving a patient's life and hope to see significant advancement toward further adoption of XSTAT as a standard of care for severe hemorrhage in pre-hospital settings.”

Click Here To See - XSTAT In Action

www.rypulassessments.com

Follow Rob Verger on Twitter: @robverger