Showing posts with label high threat protection. Show all posts
Showing posts with label high threat protection. Show all posts

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Marines get groundbreaking, unstoppable new rifle magazine

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/01/12/marines-get-groundbreaking-unstoppable-new-rifle-magazine.html

A reliable weapon can be the difference between life and death for those serving in the military.

The Magpul Industries PMAG GEN 3 is a magazine for rifles that ensures the user stays lethal in a fight. More than 20,000 rounds fired? No problem. Still no magazine stoppages.

Why is that so important? Because every time a stoppage happens with a weapon, it means a lost opportunity to neutralize an enemy combatant. But the even bigger issue is that a stoppage can put the warfighter at risk and even lead to loss of life.

With AR, M4, and M27 weapons for example, magazine problems are a primary culprit in stoppages. But if a warfighter uses the PMAG, then the risk of stoppage is massively reduced.

The US Marine Corps has made the decision to ensure that all Marines have the best magazine available. Going forward, Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 has become the official magazine, giving Marines that extra advantage to stay alive and lethal in a firefight.

This is the first commercial magazine adopted as the official standard for the Marine Corps primary service rifle, Magpul explained.

Magpul has also introduced the PMAG GEN 3 in the “medium coyote tan” color. The black and medium coyote tan are now the only magazines authorized by the USMC for combat and training. The government-designed EPM USGI (aluminum) magazine will be used only for training purposes.



PMAG GEN 3 Basics

The PMAG GEN 3 would be ideal for the M4, M16, M27IAR (Infantry Automatic Rifle) and M249 SAW (Squad Automatic Weapon). And the magazine works with all types of bullets.

And in spite of tens of thousands of rounds, it won’t melt because of its special advanced material.

The military put the PMAG GEN 3 through years of testing, and thousands and thousands and thousands of rounds. And what did they find? No stoppages.

For example, testing found that even in 20,400 rounds of M855A1— a tricky ammo type— still there were zero stoppages.

Both the US and NATO have what’s called “rough handling” testing and Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 passed all of it with flying colors.

What does mean? It is one rugged magazine. You can use it in extreme cold— as in -60 degrees Fahrenheit cold— all the way through to 180 degrees of extreme heat, and this magazine still cannot be stopped. It is reliable.

The magazine also easily passed military testing against things like dust, UV exposure and even salt fog. You can also throw whatever dirt and grime is around and it will still outperform other magazine options.

So how does it work?

The PMAG GEN 3 loads from stripper clips. It inserts rapidly on a closed vault with a full 30 rounds. There is a smart over-insertion stop to protect against hard-core magazine changes and drops.

When you’re shooting, there is a handy window that Magpul describes as working like a gas gage. As you fire, it will provide exact data on just how many rounds you have left by a quick glance at the orange coil.



This magazine drops free, making reload very quick and efficient. There’s a dust and impact cover, but you don’t need it to store the magazine loaded. It is really there to protect against major impact like dropping the mags out of aircraft, for example.

Unlike the USGI aluminum magazine, it is very easy to disassemble to clean.

Dominating the field and winning the Marine Corps contract

In battery after battery of military testing over the course of several years, the PMAG GEN M3 relentlessly dominated the competition. In tens of thousands of rounds, there were zero magazine-related stoppages and it performed better than any other magazine. The GEN M3 was pitted against both government developed USGI and commercial mags— but none could come close to rivaling the PMAG GEN 3’s relentlessly reliable performance.

Magpul is highly motivated to find top-notch solutions for warfighters. Founder Richard Fitzpatrick was Marine Reconnaissance, many at the company served in the Corps, and have children currently serving. This is a company that understands the needs of those serving in the US military and takes delivering excellence extremely seriously.

“Firearm performance is a passion for us at Magpul, whether for military weapon systems or for civilian arms for defense and recreation,” Duane Liptak, Magpul Industries’ product management and marketing director, said. “Very early in the company history, Magpul’s founders identified shortcomings in the USGI magazine, and we’ve been dedicated to making the most reliable magazines in the world because although it may seem like a simple box with a spring, people’s lives depend heavily on this item performing.”

What’s next for Magpul? For civilians, there will be some very big reveals at SHOT Show next week. To find out first, download the latest Tactical Talk and meet a former Marine Corps fighter pilot who will give you an exclusive peek at some of the exciting news.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

10 mistakes executive protection agents need to stop making

By Christian West & Jared Van Driessche

Tags: Development, Executive protection, Training
Everybody slips up sometimes. We’re only human after all. And as Hall of Fame basketball coach John Wooden pointed out, “If you’re not making mistakes, then you’re not doing anything.”

The wisdom of this statement is of course not to encourage inaction to avoid mistakes, but to learn from them.

So in the spirit of helping everyone working in executive protection get a little smarter – and thereby making the whole industry a little sharper at our game – here’s a list of the 10 mistakes we have seen executive protection agents make too many times – and can learn from.

Thinking it’s about you
We’re sorry if we’re the ones that have to break this to you, but executive protection is a service industry. It’s never about you. It’s always about the client.


It’s about providing clients with knowhow, activities and circumstances that keep them safe, happy and productive. That’s what the client needs, and that’s why they pay us. Everyone has personal stuff to deal with, so deal with it personally, and don’t bring it to your client.

They don’t need to hear about your day, your life or whatever else might be eating you. Even if some monumental, life-changing event just occurred on your way to work or while you’re on coverage. Actually, they shouldn’t hear about it. Why? Because the relationship is professional, not personal. Although the client might at times spend more time with you than they do with their spouse, it’s still not about you. It’s never about you or your needs. Ouch. Deal with it or find another job.

This can be hard, we know. Life happens when you’re on coverage. Maybe a family member has just died, or you received some horrible news like your parent’s house burned to the ground. Still, when you’re on the job, you’re on the job. The friendly “How are you?” gets answered with a “Good, and you?” rather than an open sharing of what’s also running through your head. Because that could disturb the client’s mind. And it’s not about you.



Wanting to be friends with the client
This can be another hard one. It’s the most natural thing in the world to want to be friends with the people we spend time and work with, but in the case of executive protection, it’s not a good idea for either the client or you. And certainly not for your career.

First, let’s all understand that being friendly is not the same as being friends. Maintaining a positive and polite tone is one thing. Trying to establish a personal relationship with a client is something else. It’s important that you don’t move out of the lane of your role as protector. Your job description does not include asking clients for favors or business advice, or trying to get family employed. Don’t involve yourself in business that isn’t related to your business.

Agents who do this are overstepping their bounds and trying to cross a five-lane highway. Even though our clients can at times be lonely and insulated, and might themselves make friendly overtures to protective agents, it’s important to maintain a professional distance. Because sooner or later the agent is going to get hit, despite what seemed to be a good level of comfort and rapport. They are taking advantage of the client, not helping him or her.

Another problem some immature agents have is trying to get noticed and get facetime with the client. They might be a little star struck, and they would like to see the feeling reciprocated. They might try to insert themselves into the client’s life, getting too close to them or to their staff.

But folks who are public figures see this all the time, and they’re seldom enamored with people trying play the game of “I want to get close to you”. They’d rather be far away from people like that. Guess which side of this budding personal relationship is going to get nipped, and be looking for work elsewhere?



Not respecting others who work around the client
Some people need to feel more important than others and end up making trouble for themselves. Don’t be one of those guys.

This problem arises when an executive protection agent thinks the job is more significant than the work of the client’s executive assistant, estate manager, nanny, chef, house cleaner or other staff. While the agent might be good with the client, he or she isn’t necessarily so with everyone else – and treats them differently, with varying levels of respect.

What our unfortunate agent doesn’t understand is this: the woman who cleans the toilet might have a very close relationship to the family that has lasted for years. They would much rather keep the loyal cleaner than the new EP agent who acts like a jerk to her.

Don’t think you’re your irreplaceable. Anyone can be replaced, starting with ill-mannered executive protection agents. So be respectful of the role others have in the client’s staff and life – that’s a great way to earn their respect, too.

Not blending in to client’s lifestyle, company culture or personal preferences
It’s not our job to force our culture or personalities on our clients. It’s our job to fit in.

If you come off as too militaristic, you’re going to make the clients feel like prisoners in their own home. If you act like Robocop around the spouse and children, they’re unlikely to feel comfortable even though they might be safe. And even Mr. Personality might need to take a chill pill, because his perky greetings and chattiness start getting on people’s nerves.



You don’t want to come off like that weird uncle who always manages to show up at the summer garden party in a three-piece suit or the funeral in his favorite Hawaii shirt. You want to blend in, so the client never has to think “who is this guy?!”

Check out Jared’s recent blog on being a social chameleon for way more perspective on this point.

Having a big ego does not make you many amigos on the protective team
So let’s get this straight. The client is a big shot, and that makes you one, too. You’re basking in the strong light of the principal’s halo, as the detail leader no less, and your power gives you license to treat other team members poorly.

Really?

We’ve seen it happen more than once. A guy who is a capable operator rises through the ranks to assume some management responsibility. He’s very aware of his role and perceived power, and he wields it to his own advantage without worrying about how that impacts other members of the protective team. The principal doesn’t know half the story, and likes him. Until he doesn’t.

One day, the guy rubs the principal’s spouse the wrong way, and he’s on his way off the detail. The next day, he’s looking for work and everyone he treated poorly remembers him exactly for that: being a jerk. And who wants to work with a jerk?

Don’t let your career turn to toast because you let your ego do the driving when you got a bit of influence. Instead, pay it forward. Someone just starting out in the industry might be a strong player in a few years, so be sure not to burn bridges you might need later.

Playing favorites
This is another pitfall that too many agents dive right into. It’s understandable because it’s human nature to want to be liked. And it’s yet another a good example of “seemed like a good idea at the time”.

Some agents who don’t get the bigger picture think they are special, and that the client really cares for them. They don’t see anyone else with such a close relationship with the client, and this illusion soon becomes a dangerous pseudo-reality. For one thing, it probably was never true in the first place. But even if it did seem to be, it clouds your judgement and leads to nothing good. Ultimately, it will cost you your job.

Cultivating a culture of favoritism damages team readiness. It’s unhealthy for the wellbeing of the program and the principal. And it’s not a sustainable foundation for anything. The simple fact of the matter is that if you’re the favorite today, someday you won’t be. And where do you go from there? Avoid being the favorite at all costs. With our history of developing and managing EP programs we see people fall into “the favorites trap” all too often.

Favoritism starts out innocently enough and often with the best intentions. The client really likes Tim, and Tim has to do everything. That’s a win-win for a short while, but it soon turns counterproductive.

The detail rapidly becomes a logistical nightmare. Tim will burn out – he’s too close to the client and working too many hours. The rest of the team will suffer – they come off like second-class citizens. The solution is to build everyone up to Tim’s level, not to turn Tim into a fast-flaming fave.

Being a control freak
We’re all for being sticklers when it comes to security and following the SOPs designed to safeguard our principals. But we also recognize that even the best of plans sometimes get broadsided by the client, and all for good reason: whatever the client says it is.

Or doesn’t say. You see, it’s the client’s business, not ours. Business opportunities arise suddenly; someone else’s plans changed suddenly. It doesn’t matter. When we’re on the clock, we’re on client time, not ours.

This can be tough for the pack of alpha males and females who often end up in our industry. We’re used to being in control, and we plan carefully. But when you can’t control it, just embrace it. You’ll end up being less stressed, and you won’t stress the client with unnecessary interruptions designed to satisfy your schedule, not the client’s priorities.

Trying to take advantage of the client financially
You know this is wrong without us telling you, right? We hope so. And yet, the point deserves a little clarification.

Working with C-suite executives, celebrities and other high net worth clients means moving about in some very different environments than most of us are used to. One day you’re bunking at the Motel 6, the next day you’re staying at the Four Seasons. You’re used to figuring out the cost per ounce when you compare hot dogs at the supermarket, and now you’re figuring out a menu that doesn’t have prices on it, trying to decide what to have for dinner.

It’s easy to think that because the client is wealthy, money doesn’t matter and you might as well try that caviar with gold leaf. It’s also wrongheaded. Money does matter – both in terms of how others will view your judgement and integrity – and to program success.

There’s always a budget for everything. Even if you don’t know what it is, assume someone does and is ready to check your expense reports. Go ahead and order a good meal, but don’t feel sanctioned to order the absolute most expensive item on the menu. Keep a clean path. Pay for your personal items yourself. Agents who go far in this industry respect the client’s wallet and work to save their money.

Clogging up information transparency – a.k.a. lying or being selectively honest
It’s true now and it’s been true for thousands of years: Information is power, and asymmetrical access to information can give a competitive advantage or disadvantage. That’s great if you’re fighting a war, but it’s really not good if you’re working on a team together.

We’re not saying that everyone needs to know everything. But the executive protection agent who deliberately resists sharing information, reduces information transparency or spreads false information is on his or her way to career suicide.

Some inexperienced agents might have the erroneous belief that hoarding information will further their interests. They’re making a fundamental mistake. They haven’t understood that what’s good for the team is good for the principal and for themselves. We’ve seen agents try to keep executive assistants in the dark to make them look incompetent. We’ve heard of agents who say the principal’s spouse prefers this or that driver – even when that wasn’t the case – to play favorites or gain personal advantage.

People like this are worse than dishonest. If they’re willing to hijack parts of the program for their own reasons, what else are they willing to do? Their reasons are never good, and manipulating the healthy flow of useful information will always hit them in the back of the head like a boomerang.

Getting the balance wrong between tactical discipline and friendly service
Being a good executive protection agent means juggling multiple roles seamlessly and imperceptibly. We’re the tactical tough guy when we need to be. We’re the friendly concierge if that’s what’s called for. We know not to overplay either hand. And we know when to switch immediately.

There are often multiple ways to accomplish the same objective. Use your situational and social awareness to find the ideal path, striking a middle way between the many possible extremes. You want to make sure the room you’re leading the principal to is safe? Great, but you don’t need to act as if you’re clearing a house in Ramadi. Find another way that works, and doesn’t make the principal wonder what’s going on and what movie you’re in.

Similarly, it’s great to be service-minded, but not excessively friendly in all circumstances. We’re here to facilitate the principal’s smooth flow through the day and night, but we’re willing to stand up and disrupt the good vibes if that means maintaining security.

Like so many other things, it’s a balance. We wish you luck and skill in finding yours!

Let’s learn from our mistakes
The good thing about mistakes is that they’re learning opportunities: they help us to discover better ways of doing things. Once you get over the initial pain of having put your hand too close to the fire, you know better the next time and can avoid a lifetime of burnt fingers. At least you could know better.

It’s only when we continue to make the same mistakes over and over that people start calling us names. Similarly, not learning from others’ mistakes is rarely an indication of a sharp mind.

We admit that we’ve learned some of them the hard way – by putting our own hands in the flames, so to speak. Other lessons came easier, by observing colleagues and staff get burned themselves. But they’re all things we need to be aware of and get better at.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Trump Wall May Reinforce Shift to Maritime Migrant Routes

Written by Tristan Clavel  Tuesday, 28 March 2017
US/Mexico Border Human Smuggling



Central American undocumented migrants are shifting to maritime transportation, according to a recent report, likely as a result of Mexico's crackdown on land routes, a trend that would likely increase should the US-Mexico border wall be extended.

An investigative report by El País shows that Central American migrants are increasingly boarding small boats to travel from Guatemala's Ocós coastal municipality to the Mazatán municipality in the Mexican state of Chiapas.

Smugglers charge between $400 and $800 per migrant, according to the Spanish news media. Some migrants are opting to make this six to eight hour journey rather than attempt to cross the border between Mexico and Guatemala, an area which has become much more of a focus for Mexican law enforcement cracking down on undocumented migrants.

Every day, Ocós witnesses three or four vessels carrying around 15 to 20 migrants along this maritime route, according to a local official interviewed by El País. This route has traditionally been used by the Mexican trafficking group los Zetas to smuggle drugs, which has now reportedly diversified its portfolio with human smuggling.

Meanwhile, on March 13, 60 US senators signed an open letter warning of the potential adverse consequences of the preliminary 2018 budget proposal for maritime interdiction efforts. The proposed budget made no mention of the coast guard, according to the New York Times, but it nonetheless spurred fears of budget cuts for the coast guard in order to help strengthen security along the US-Mexico border and build a wall.

InSight Crime Analysis
Following the 2014 humanitarian crisis caused by the arrival of tens of thousands of undocumented children to the US-Mexico border, Mexico began cracking down on migrants travelling north through its territory, in large part due to pressure from the US. As a result, security was reinforced along its extremely porous southern border with Guatemala. Along with creating adverse consequences for the safety of migrants targeted by organized crime, the crackdown may well have led migrants to adapt and turn to maritime routes, as reported by El País.

SEE ALSO: Coverage of Human Smuggling
Should President Donald Trump's now infamous wall be built, the same trend could repeat itself along Mexico's border with the United States. There is little reason to believe that criminal groups would not open drug trafficking maritime routes from Mexico to the United States to human smuggling, given the criminal profits to be made, or that migrants would not adapt and increasingly turn to maritime routes.

Moreover, this trend would likely be reinforced by cuts to the US Coast Guard's budget to help finance the construction of the wall. According to the New York Times, the Coast Guard stopped more than 6,000 undocumented migrants and seized 200 metric tons of cocaine during the 2016 fiscal year. The open letter from the US Senators referenced above says that the US Coast Guard intercepts more cocaine at sea than what is seized at ports of entry and amongst all other elements of domestic law enformcement combined.

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How 'invisible armor' could defeat bullets and blades

Ever wonder if there was such a thing as transparent armor? It sounds like something straight out of a comic book, but it's something the Navy has actually created.

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scientists have created a remarkable transparent armor that is lightweight and still provides excellent protection.

Nearly as transparent as glass, the armor is essentially invisible protection from bullets. And if the armor surface is damaged, warfighters could fix it on the fly with something as simple as a hot plate and the armor will meld itself back together.

Think about how “bulletproof glass” (a misnomer since it is often only bullet resistant) works – you can see through it and it stops bullets.

Now what if you could do that for body armor and helmets? That’s the idea here.



This next-generation armor advance could also amp up transparent bulletproof walls to protect tourist attractions from the attacks we’ve seen in Paris and most recently, in London.

What’s the armor made of?

The transparent polymer armor gets its transparency from something known as tiny crystalline domains. The armor itself is made up of alternating layers of elastomeric polymer combined with a harder material substrate.

NRL scientists conducted tests using polymeric materials as a coating to try to enhance impact resistance.

By applying layers of the special materials to body armor and helmets, the result was better protection for warriors against bullets.

The armor also helped reduce the impact of blast waves caused by something like an IED explosion, which could potentially help prevent brain trauma.

When a bullet hits the armor

If you picture a windshield that has been struck by a rock kicked up while driving, the rock’s impact may cause damage that makes it difficult to see through the windshield.

One of the amazing things about this see-through armor is that when it's struck by a projectile, such as a bullet, it still retains its lucid nature. There’s virtually no impact on visibility and the damage is limited only to the spot where the bullet connected with the armor.

Repair vs. replace

The possibility exists that this futuristic body armor could be ironed back into shape after it sustained some hits, because of the material used to create it.

The material needs to be heated to around 100 degrees Celsius, which then causes it to become hot enough to melt the tiny crystallites. By heating the material, any impact from the bullet can be melded back together and returned to its normal state. Scientists believe that this sort of repair will not impact how the armor performs.

THIS FOAM STOPS BULLETS COLD AND PULVERIZES THEM TO DUST

Easy, fast repairs can be a great advantage for warfighters operating in remote locations and it can save money by repairing rather than replacing.

Implications for protecting against global terror attacks

In a scenario like the recent London attack, lightweight body armor approaches like the aforementioned can be very useful to protect armed officers from bladed weapons, bullets and other threats while the reduced weight can improve their speed, agility and flexibility of response.

Like the Capitol building in the US, armed officers protect the building and those working in and visiting the building. Based on the information provided publicly thus far, the terrorist wielded a bladed weapon and attacked British officers. One officer was tragically killed.

Guns and explosive devices are not the only methods of attack used by Islamic extremist terrorists. In Europe, terrorist plots and attacks have increasingly involved bladed weapons on foot as well the weaponization of vehicles.

Islamic extremist groups such as al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and the Islamic State group have been actively promoting these sorts of attack methods.

Just last month in Paris, a terrorist tried to launch an attack with machetes at the popular tourist site of the Louvre museum. A French soldier stopped him before there were any casualties.

In 2013, two terrorists drove at British Army soldier Fusilier Lee Rigby, who was walking a street in England. The terrorists then exited the vehicle, attacked him with blades and murdered him by hacking him to death.

Invisible Walls?

Ultimately, advances like NRLs in transparent armor could play a vital role in amping up “invisible” walls could be used to stop both people and vehicles from storming sites and areas. By enhancing protection, it could help prevent attacks and casualties.

Paris recently announced they are building an eight-foot bulletproof glass wall around the Eiffel Tower. Why? Tourist sites are attractive targets for terrorists. The goal is to stop not just bullets but prevent vehicles loaded with bombs from gaining access.

Transparent armor-ed up walls mean tourists can still enjoy an uninterrupted view while benefiting from enhanced protection.

Advanced armor like this can also become a deterrent to future attacks.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Origami inspired shield might save police officer's lives

Posted by Jessica Romero

A mechanical engineer professor took on the problem of police protection and he might have found a great solution. He and his team drew inspiration from an unlikely source: origami.

The shield can be compactly folded and easily transported. It consists of thin sheets of Kevlar and is about as heavy as a large suitcase. Even though it is compact it expands in five seconds which allows it to be used in unexpected dangerous situations.

The designer also pictured it being used to protect children and other people in dangerous situations where there is no cover.

According to Daily Mail:

Design is made up of 12 layers of bulletproof Kevlar.

Weighs only 55 pounds (25 kilograms). Many of the steel shields currently used approach 100 pounds (45 kilograms).

It uses a Yoshimura origami crease pattern to expand around an officer, providing protection on the side in addition to protecting them in the front.

When expanded — which takes only five seconds — it can provide cover for officers and stop bullets from several types of handguns.

In testing, the barrier successfully stopped bullets from smaller 9 mm pistols, all the way up to .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum 'hand cannons'.

Read more: http://kfiam640.iheart.com/onair/tim-conway-jr-33371/origami-inspired-shield-might-save-police-15574462/#ixzz4buad5gz8

Paris shooting: terror investigation launched after suspect shot dead

Man identified by security official as Ziyed Ben Belgacem was killed hours after he shot and injured a policeman north of Paris

French anti-terror officials have launched an investigation after a man known to the security services shot at a police officer in northern Paris before travelling across the city to Orly airport, where he was killed following an altercation with another officer.

The attacker was said to be a radicalised Muslim who appeared on a security watchlist, police sources told Reuters. France’s anti-terrorism prosecutor later confirmed that an inquiry had been opened into the incident on Saturday morning.

The suspect was identified by a security official as Ziyed Ben Belgacem, a 39-year-old born in France, the Associated Press reported.

Prosecutors said the suspect’s house was among scores searched in November 2015 in the immediate aftermath of terror attacks in Paris in which 130 people were killed. Those searches targeted people with suspected radical leanings.

The suspect’s father and brother were detained by police for questioning on Saturday.

The French president, François Hollande, said the investigation would determine whether the Orly attacker “had a terrorist plot behind him”.

The French defence minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, said the attacker had assaulted a patrol of three air force soldiers, one of whom was a woman.

The attacker wrestled her to the floor and tried to take her weapon, but she was able to keep hold of it. The two other soldiers then opened fire to protect her and passengers in the airport, he said.

 A trolley stretcher is wheeled into Orly airport southern terminal after the shooting.
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 A stretcher is wheeled into Orly airport’s southern terminal after the shooting. Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters
The air force personnel were deployed as part of Sentinelle, a military operation launched in January 2015 after the Paris terrorist attacks to support the police and protect sensitive sites.

The interior minister, Bruno Le Roux, said the man shot dead at the airport was linked with a car-jacking incident earlier on Saturday in a northern suburb of Paris. He said the man had shot at a female police officer after being stopped for speeding before fleeing the scene and stealing a car at gunpoint.

Le Roux said the officer had not been badly injured.


No explosive devices were found on the dead man’s body, an interior ministry spokesman said.

About 3,000 people were evacuated from both terminals at Orly and all flights were suspended, with some diverted to Charles de Gaulle airport. Some flights began operating again early Saturday afternoon. No one else was injured in the Orly incident.

 Passengers wait among emergency vehicles at Orly airport.
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 Passengers wait among emergency vehicles at Orly airport. Photograph: Benoit Tessier/Reuters
The airport shooting follows after a similar incident last month at the Louvre museum in central Paris.

France remains under a state of emergency in the wake of the attack on the Bataclan music venue in November 2015 in which jihadi gunmen killed 90 people, and the Nice truck attack last July that claimed the lives of 84 people and injured hundreds more.

On a visit to Paris on Saturday the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met survivors of the Bataclan attack, praising their bravery and the “amazing progress” of their recovery.

The royal couple met a 25-year-old, known only as Jessica, who was shot seven times in the leg, hip and back as she dined with friends at La Belle Equipe restaurant, and Kevin, 28, a Bataclan concert-goer shot in the leg.

The couple visited the hospital where the pair have been treated as reports of the incident at Orly airport emerged. A Kensington Palace spokesman said the royal visit was unaffected.

This article was corrected on 19 March 2017. Sentinelle is an operation, not an elite special forces group as suggested earlier.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

U.S. Special Ops orders new batch of low-profile pickups from Battelle

 U.S. Special Ops orders new batch of low-profile pickups from Battelle
By Gary GasteluPublished July 27, 2016FoxNews.com

And you thought your pickup was special.

Battelle has landed a second contract to supply U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) with stealthy, armored trucks built to blend into the background in potentially hostile environments.

Similar to the commercial security vehicles that Battelle builds, the trucks were designed to maintain their stock appearance while providing military-grade levels of protection.

The non-profit R&D outfit has been modifying Toyota Hilux pickups for SOCOM under a contract for “Non Standard Commercial Vehicles” that began in 2013. It will add foreign market Toyota Land Cruisers and Ford Rangers as the partnership is extended over the next five years through a $170 million deal for several hundred trucks.



The models were chosen for both their baseline capabilities and popularity in the theaters where they will be used. Program Manager Jim Labine says Battelle uses a combination of consumer aftermarket and custom-made parts to fully convert the trucks’ suspensions and beef up their drivetrains to improve their off-road chops and better handle the thousands of pounds of armor added.

That armor is a mix of Dyneema plates hidden under the bodywork and sapphire-reinforced glass. Several levels of protection will be offered -- all classified, of course -- but the most potent models can provide protection on all sides, top and bottom included, from large-caliber firearms and IED shrapnel. Self-sealing fuel tanks and run flat tires are also employed.

Labine says a major engineering challenge is fitting the inflexible materials inside the existing bodywork without encroaching too much on the interior space, or leaving any gaps in coverage. From the outside, the trucks are nearly indistinguishable from the showroom versions. The only noticeable difference on the Ranger prototype is its very slightly thicker window trim.

The new trucks will be evaluated over the course of the next year before production begins, overlapping with fulfilment of the original contract.

Paranoid, off-roading fanatics shouldn’t waste their time looking for the trucks at their local military surplus auction anytime soon, however. Labine says that the upgrades have the secondary benefit of extending their lifecycles, and, even if SOCOM doesn’t destroy the evidence when it finishes with them, you’d probably walk right by them on the lot, anyway.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

10 mistakes executive protection agents need to stop making

Published on July 20, 2016
Jared Van Driessche

Everybody slips up sometimes. We’re only human after all. And as Hall of Fame basketball coach John Wooden pointed out, “If you’re not making mistakes, then you’re not doing anything.”

The wisdom of this statement is of course not to encourage inaction to avoid mistakes, but to learn from them.

So in the spirit of helping everyone working in executive protection get a little smarter – and thereby making the whole industry a little sharper at our game – here’s a list of the 10 mistakes we have seen executive protection agents make too many times – and can learn from.

Thinking it’s about you

We’re sorry if we’re the ones that have to break this to you, but executive protection is a service industry. It’s never about you. It’s always about the client.

It’s about providing clients with know-how, activities and circumstances that keep them safe, happy and productive. That’s what the client needs, and that’s why they pay us. Everyone has personal stuff to deal with, so deal with it personally, and don’t bring it to your client.

They don’t need to hear about your day, your life or whatever else might be eating you. Even if some monumental, life-changing event just occurred on your way to work or while you’re on coverage. Actually, they shouldn’t hear about it. Why? Because the relationship is professional, not personal. Although the client might at times spend more time with you than they do with their spouse, it’s still not about you. It’s never about you or your needs. Ouch. Deal with it or find another job.

This can be hard, we know. Life happens when you’re on coverage. Maybe a family member has just died, or you received some horrible news like your parent’s house burned to the ground. Still, when you’re on the job, you’re on the job. The friendly “How are you?” gets answered with a “Good, and you?” rather than an open sharing of what’s also running through your head. Because that could disturb the client’s mind. And it’s not about you.



Wanting to be friends with the client

This can be another hard one. It’s the most natural thing in the world to want to be friends with the people we spend time and work with, but in the case of executive protection, it’s not a good idea for either the client or you. And certainly not for your career.

First, let’s all understand that being friendly is not the same as being friends. Maintaining a positive and polite tone is one thing. Trying to establish a personal relationship with a client is something else. It’s important that you don’t move out of the lane of your role as protector. Your job description does not include asking clients for favors or business advice, or trying to get family employed. Don’t involve yourself in business that isn’t related to your business.

Agents who do this are overstepping their bounds and trying to cross a five-lane highway. Even though our clients can at times be lonely and insulated, and might themselves make friendly overtures to protective agents, it’s important to maintain a professional distance. Because sooner or later the agent is going to get hit, despite what seemed to be a good level of comfort and rapport. They are taking advantage of the client, not helping him or her.

Another problem some immature agents have is trying to get noticed and get facetime with the client. They might be a little star struck, and they would like to see the feeling reciprocated. They might try to insert themselves into the client’s life, getting too close to them or to their staff.

But folks who are public figures see this all the time, and they’re seldom enamored with people trying play the game of “I want to get close to you”. They’d rather be far away from people like that. Guess which side of this budding personal relationship is going to get nipped, and be looking for work elsewhere?

Not respecting others who work around the client

Some people need to feel more important than others and end up making trouble for themselves. Don’t be one of those guys.

This problem arises when an executive protection agent thinks the job is more significant than the work of the client’s executive assistant, estate manager, nanny, chef, house cleaner or other staff. While the agent might be good with the client, he or she isn’t necessarily so with everyone else – and treats them differently, with varying levels of respect.

What our unfortunate agent doesn’t understand is this: the woman who cleans the toilet might have a very close relationship to the family that has lasted for years. They would much rather keep the loyal cleaner than the new EP agent who acts like a jerk to her.

Don’t think you’re your irreplaceable. Anyone can be replaced, starting with ill-mannered executive protection agents. So be respectful of the role others have in the client’s staff and life – that’s a great way to earn their respect, too.



Not blending in to client’s lifestyle, company culture or personal preferences

It’s not our job to force our culture or personalities on our clients. It’s our job to fit in.

If you come off as too militaristic, you’re going to make the clients feel like prisoners in their own home. If you act like Robocop around the spouse and children, they’re unlikely to feel comfortable even though they might be safe. And even Mr. Personality might need to take a chill pill, because his perky greetings and chattiness start getting on people’s nerves.

You don’t want to come off like that weird uncle who always manages to show up at the summer garden party in a three-piece suit or the funeral in his favorite Hawaii shirt. You want to blend in, so the client never has to think “who is this guy?!”

Check out Jared’s recent blog on being a social chameleon for way more perspective on this point.

Having a big ego does not make you many amigos on the protective team

So let’s get this straight. The client is a big shot, and that makes you one, too. You’re basking in the strong light of the principal’s halo, as the detail leader no less, and your power gives you license to treat other team members poorly.

Really?

We’ve seen it happen more than once. A guy who is a capable operator rises through the ranks to assume some management responsibility. He’s very aware of his role and perceived power, and he wields it to his own advantage without worrying about how that impacts other members of the protective team. The principal doesn’t know half the story, and likes him. Until he doesn’t.

One day, the guy rubs the principal’s spouse the wrong way, and he’s on his way off the detail. The next day, he’s looking for work and everyone he treated poorly remembers him exactly for that: being a jerk. And who wants to work with a jerk?

Don’t let your career turn to toast because you let your ego do the driving when you got a bit of influence. Instead, pay it forward. Someone just starting out in the industry might be a strong player in a few years, so be sure not to burn bridges you might need later.

Playing favorites

This is another pitfall that too many agents dive right into. It’s understandable because it’s human nature to want to be liked. And it’s yet another a good example of “seemed like a good idea at the time”.

Some agents who don’t get the bigger picture think they are special, and that the client really cares for them. They don’t see anyone else with such a close relationship with the client, and this illusion soon becomes a dangerous pseudo-reality. For one thing, it probably was never true in the first place. But even if it did seem to be, it clouds your judgement and leads to nothing good. Ultimately, it will cost you your job.

Cultivating a culture of favoritism damages team readiness. It’s unhealthy for the wellbeing of the program and the principal. And it’s not a sustainable foundation for anything. The simple fact of the matter is that if you’re the favorite today, someday you won’t be. And where do you go from there? Avoid being the favorite at all costs. With our history of developing and managing EP programs we see people fall into “the favorites trap” all too often.

Favoritism starts out innocently enough and often with the best intentions. The client really likes Tim, and Tim has to do everything. That’s a win-win for a short while, but it soon turns counterproductive.

The detail rapidly becomes a logistical nightmare. Tim will burn out – he’s too close to the client and working too many hours. The rest of the team will suffer – they come off like second-class citizens. The solution is to build everyone up to Tim’s level, not to turn Tim into a fast-flaming fave.

Being a control freak

We’re all for being sticklers when it comes to security and following the SOPs designed to safeguard our principals. But we also recognize that even the best of plans sometimes get broadsided by the client, and all for good reason: whatever the client says it is.

Or doesn’t say. You see, it’s the client’s business, not ours. Business opportunities arise suddenly; someone else’s plans changed suddenly. It doesn’t matter. When we’re on the clock, we’re on client time, not ours.

This can be tough for the pack of alpha males and females who often end up in our industry. We’re used to being in control, and we plan carefully. But when you can’t control it, just embrace it. You’ll end up being less stressed, and you won’t stress the client with unnecessary interruptions designed to satisfy your schedule, not the client’s priorities.

Trying to take advantage of the client financially

You know this is wrong without us telling you, right? We hope so. And yet, the point deserves a little clarification.

Working with C-suite executives, celebrities and other high net worth clients means moving about in some very different environments than most of us are used to. One day you’re bunking at the Motel 6, the next day you’re staying at the Four Seasons. You’re used to figuring out the cost per ounce when you compare hot dogs at the supermarket, and now you’re figuring out a menu that doesn’t have prices on it, trying to decide what to have for dinner.

It’s easy to think that because the client is wealthy, money doesn’t matter and you might as well try that caviar with gold leaf. It’s also wrongheaded. Money does matter – both in terms of how others will view your judgement and integrity – and to program success.

There’s always a budget for everything. Even if you don’t know what it is, assume someone does and is ready to check your expense reports. Go ahead and order a good meal, but don’t feel sanctioned to order the absolute most expensive item on the menu. Keep a clean path. Pay for your personal items yourself. Agents who go far in this industry respect the client’s wallet and work to save their money.

Clogging up information transparency – a.k.a. lying or being selectively honest

It’s true now and it’s been true for thousands of years: Information is power, and asymmetrical access to information can give a competitive advantage or disadvantage. That’s great if you’re fighting a war, but it’s really not good if you’re working on a team together.

We’re not saying that everyone needs to know everything. But the executive protection agent who deliberately resists sharing information, reduces information transparency or spreads false information is on his or her way to career suicide.

Some inexperienced agents might have the erroneous belief that hoarding information will further their interests. They’re making a fundamental mistake. They haven’t understood that what’s good for the team is good for the principal and for themselves. We’ve seen agents try to keep executive assistants in the dark to make them look incompetent. We’ve heard of agents who say the principal’s spouse prefers this or that driver – even when that wasn’t the case – to play favorites or gain personal advantage.

People like this are worse than dishonest. If they’re willing to hijack parts of the program for their own reasons, what else are they willing to do? Their reasons are never good, and manipulating the healthy flow of useful information will always hit them in the back of the head like a boomerang.

Getting the balance wrong between tactical discipline and friendly service

Being a good executive protection agent means juggling multiple roles seamlessly and imperceptibly. We’re the tactical tough guy when we need to be. We’re the friendly concierge if that’s what’s called for. We know not to overplay either hand. And we know when to switch immediately.

There are often multiple ways to accomplish the same objective. Use your situational and social awareness to find the ideal path, striking a middle way between the many possible extremes. You want to make sure the room you’re leading the principal to is safe? Great, but you don’t need to act as if you’re clearing a house in Ramadi. Find another way that works, and doesn’t make the principal wonder what’s going on and what movie you’re in.

Similarly, it’s great to be service-minded, but not excessively friendly in all circumstances. We’re here to facilitate the principal’s smooth flow through the day and night, but we’re willing to stand up and disrupt the good vibes if that means maintaining security.



Like so many other things, it’s a balance. We wish you luck and skill in finding yours!

Let’s learn from our mistakes

The good thing about mistakes is that they’re learning opportunities: they help us to discover better ways of doing things. Once you get over the initial pain of having put your hand too close to the fire, you know better the next time and can avoid a lifetime of burnt fingers. At least you could know better.

It’s only when we continue to make the same mistakes over and over that people start calling us names. Similarly, not learning from others’ mistakes is rarely an indication of a sharp mind.

We admit that we’ve learned some of them the hard way – by putting our own hands in the flames, so to speak. Other lessons came easier, by observing colleagues and staff get burned themselves. But they’re all things we need to be aware of and get better at.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Crooks Hack Taiwan ATMs With 'Smartphone,' No Bank Card, Steal Millions

Police say Russian suspects operate ATM machines without bank card, make off with $2.2 million.

Hackers, believed to be Russian nationals, stole around $2.2 million from ATMs in Taiwan, possibly using just their smartphones, and fled the country the following day, reports The Register, quoting Taiwanese police. Security camera footage shows the crooks used a connected device, but no bank card, to work several ATM machines of First Bank, say the police.



Craig Young of security tools firm Tripwire says it was likely the First Bank hackers “had installed malware ahead of time, enabling a wireless connection to 'jackpot' the ATMs.” Three malware strains reportedly showed up on the breached machines. He believes a weak wireless service could also allow hackers to access ATMs.

Several banks in Taiwan have suspended their ATM operations while investigation continues.


Monday, July 4, 2016

RyPul Threat Assessments specializes in worldwide protective services, school threat assessments, and active shooter training

RyPul Threat Assessments, is a SAM registered small business company located in Eastvale, California. RyPul Threat Assessments specializes in force protection, worldwide protective services, school threat assessments, site security planning, residential security plans, risk mitigation, personal protection assessments, work place violence training, active shooter training and commercial security plan reviews. 

Other company specialties include barrier placement, bulletproofing recommendations, blast mitigation plan and vehicle access restriction expertise for commercial, residential and school sites. Our experience includes providing these services for the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of State, Non- Governmental Organizations and private client security sites and various force protection sites throughout the world.




RyPul has been involved in the area of force protection, site protection, protective building material placement and upgrades for over 5 years. RyPul Threat Assessments currently provides threat assessment services to fortune 500 companies and ballistic barrier upgrade assessments to civilian schools, residences and companies on a contract basis. Our consultants’ hold professional qualifications from Military Police Services, Various Special Military Operation Units, the Los Angeles Police Department, Certified Private Investigative, (PMC) Private Military Contracting experience and years of High Threat Location site assessment experience. We hold current certifications from the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of State, Federal Emergency Management (FEMA), United States Air Force (USAF) and the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), in worldwide protective services, physical security, protecting critical infrastructure, incident command), installation security and active shooter protocols.

Call today for your professional personal, business, site or school security assessment.

Detect Design Defend

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Purchase American Flag Inspired Customized Rifle and Handgun Wall Vaults

Concealed American Flag Inspired Handmade Rifle and Handgun Wall Storage Boxes All Boxes Are Pinewood with Burned Whitewash Finish.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. - June 23, 2016 - PRLog -- In conjunction with RyPul Threat Assessments, Freedom Woodworks located in Chino, CA is offering a 5% discount on concealed American flag inspired handmade rifle and handgun wall storage vaults. All vaults are 100% pinewood with a burned whitewash finish, these boxes are handmade in the USA and can be fully customized upon agreement.

The Size and Dimensions are as follows:

38" x 21" Holds Six (6) Handguns with Shelf Storage
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Custom Orders Please email Geoffrey @ g_ponce1@yahoo.com.

Use code "WP" in your for your 5% RyPul Threat Assessments Discount.

Shipping costs to be paid by the customer.  All sales are final.

Offering a 5% discount on concealed American flag inspired wall storage vaults.

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Wednesday, June 22, 2016

U.S Government Files Show Hundreds of US Terror Plots With Refugee Connections


Newly obtained congressional data shows hundreds of terror plots have been stopped in the U.S. since 9/11 – mostly involving foreign-born suspects, including dozens of refugees.

The files are sure to inflame the debate over the Obama administration’s push to admit thousands more refugees from Syria and elsewhere, a proposal Donald Trump has vehemently opposed on the 2016 campaign trail.

“[T]hese data make clear that the United States not only lacks the ability to properly screen individuals prior to their arrival, but also that our nation has an unprecedented assimilation problem,” Sens. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, told President Obama in a June 14 letter, obtained by FoxNews.com.

The files also give fresh insight into the true scope of the terror threat and cover a wide range of cases, including:


  • A Seattle man plotting to attack a U.S. military facility
  • An Atlantic City man using his “Revolution Muslim” site to encourage confrontations with U.S. Jewish leaders “at their homes”
  • An Iraq refugee arrested in January, accused of traveling to Syria to “take up arms” with terror groups


While the June 12 massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub marked the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil since 2001, the data shows America has been facing a steady stream of plots. For the period September 2001 through 2014, data shows the U.S. successfully prosecuted 580 individuals for terrorism and terror-related cases. Further, since early 2014, at least 131 individuals were identified as being implicated in terror.

Across both those groups, the senators reported that at least 40 people initially admitted to the U.S. as refugees later were convicted or implicated in terror cases.  Among the 580 convicted, they said, at least 380 were foreign-born. The top countries of origin were Pakistan, Lebanon and Somalia, as well as the Palestinian territories.

Both Sessions and Cruz sit on the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, which compiled the terror-case information based on data from the Justice Department, news reports and other open-source information. The files were shared with FoxNews.com.

The files include dates, states of residence, countries of origin for foreign-born suspects, and reams of other details.

Specifically, they show a sharp spike in cases in 2015, largely stemming from the arrest of suspects claiming allegiance to the Islamic State. They also show a heavy concentration of cases involving suspects from California, Texas, New York and Minnesota, among other states.

EXPLORE THE DATA IN THE MAPS AND CHARTS BELOW



The senators say the terror-case repository still is missing critical details on suspects’ immigration history, which they say the Department of Homeland Security has “failed to provide.” Immigration data the senators compiled came from other sources.

Sessions and Cruz asked the president in their letter to order the departments of Justice, Homeland Security and State to "update" and provide more detailed information. The senators have sent several letters to those departments since last year requesting immigration histories of those tied to terror.

“The administration refuses to give out the information necessary to establish a sound policy that protects Americans from terrorists,” Sessions said in a statement to Fox News.  Asked about the complaints, DHS spokeswoman Gillian M. Christensen told FoxNews.com the department “will respond to the senators’ request directly and not through the press.”

“More than 100 Congressional committees, subcommittees, caucuses, commissions and groups exercise oversight and ensure accountability of DHS and we work closely with them on a daily basis. We’ve received unprecedented requests from a number of senators and representatives for physical paper files for more than 700 aliens,” she said, adding that officials have to review each page manually for privacy and other issues.

Cruz ran unsuccessfully this year for the Republican presidential nomination. Sessions, an ardent critic of the administration’s immigration policies, is supporting presumptive GOP nominee Trump.

The allegations detailed in the subcommittee’s research pertain to a range of cases, involving suspects caught traveling or trying to travel overseas to fight, as well as suspects ensnared in controversial sting operations which civil-liberties groups including the ACLU have criticized.

In a 2014 report, Human Rights Watch said nearly half of the federal counterterror convictions at the time came from “informant-based cases,” many of them sting operations where the informants played a role in the plot.  The report said: “In some cases the Federal Bureau of Investigation may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by conducting sting operations that facilitated or invented the target’s willingness to act.”

But even in some of those cases, federal agents got involved after learning of a serious suspected plot. In the case of the Seattle suspect, Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, authorities said he approached someone in 2011 about attacking a military installation. That citizen alerted law enforcement and worked with them to capture Latif and an accomplice.

FoxNews.com’s Liz Torrey contributed to this report.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Protective Security Experts From The US, Mexico, Germany and Middle East Combine Forces

LOS ANGELES - June 12, 2016 - RyPul Blog -- The CEO's of RyPul Threat Assessments, 245 Tactical and Project 7 Security Group, each physical security and threat assessments experts from around the world have created a unique partnership to protect Government Officials, Diplomats, High Profile Individuals, VIP's and Celebrities around the world 24 hours a day. Warren Pulley, the owner of RyPul Threat Assessments stated that "while each company individually specializes in a form of high threat protection, each CEO after months of consultation agreed that by joining forces and resources, we could leverage our combined unparalleled knowledge of high threat protective services and provide global reach, to each of our targeted client bases by having in place the world's best trained protective security force available anywhere in the world at a moment's notice. "

RyPul Threat Assessment specializes in providing Worldwide Protective Services and Training for Host Country security forces or Embedded Training Personnel, 245 Tactical provides expert Combative Training and Protective Security Services throughout Central and South America, while Project 7 Security Group currently protects some of the world's top pop culture icon's as they travel the globe. Each company brings the best and brightest worldwide certified protection specialists into this combined effort, which allows for specialized teams of highly skilled and trained professionals to put together protective details and training cadre capable of operating and working anywhere in the world from a war zone to a first world permissive environment without the need to contract with outside sources for specialized services.

This partnership will also offer specialized services such as conducting Commercial Building Protective Site Surveys, School Threat Assessments, Residential Security Planning, Personal Protection Profiles and Assessments, Site Security Planning, Asset Tagging and Tracking as well as providing physical Risk Mitigation Options.

For additional information please visit RyPul Threat Assessments, 245 Tactical or Project 7 Security Group on the web.

Physical Security Experts From Around The World Create A Unique Partnership To Protect Government Officials, Diplomats, High Profile Individuals, VIPs and Celebrities Around The World 24 Hours A Day.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Soldiers bleeding stopped with Injectable sponges for the first time from combat gunshot wound

Re: Posted by RyPul Threat Assessments

Firepower: Can these sponges save lives in under 20 seconds?

A U.S. military surgical team used an innovative device to staunch the bleeding on a gunshot victim, RevMedx, the company that makes it, recently announced. That marks the first documented occasion that the device has been used in a patient clinically, the company said.

The XSTAT, as the device is called, works by injecting numerous small sponges into a wound, which quickly expand and stop the bleeding. It takes just 20 seconds after contacting blood for the sponges to expand and staunch the bleeding, the company says, and they have markers in them to make them visible under x-ray, so that they can all eventually be removed.



The patient, a soldier, was reportedly shot in the left thigh, resulting in a “sizable cavity” in the leg. A forward surgical team struggled over the course of a surgery that lasted about seven hours to control all the bleeding, and decided to use the XSTAT. After they did, it stopped the bleeding almost right away, the company reported, and the patient— who had received both blood and plasma transfusions— stabilized.

"The first-in-human experience with XSTAT is the culmination of tremendous effort on the part of both RevMedx and our military collaborators," Andrew Barofsky, the president of RevMedx, said in a statement. "We are pleased to see XSTAT play a critical role in saving a patient's life and hope to see significant advancement toward further adoption of XSTAT as a standard of care for severe hemorrhage in pre-hospital settings.”

Click Here To See - XSTAT In Action

www.rypulassessments.com

Follow Rob Verger on Twitter: @robverger

Monday, May 23, 2016

Personal Security Specialist Employment

visit www.rypulassessments.com for additional information and open positions.

Job Title: Protective Security Specialist
Location: Mexico (Primary) (States of Jalisco, Nayarit, Sinaloa, Senora)
Employment Type Contract: Contractor (1099)
Education: High School or Equivalent
Category: Security Operations
How much Travel? 100%


Job Description
Perform the day-to-day protective security functions as specified in daily post and detail
Driving the lead, principal or follow vehicle during motorcade or similar operations
Act's as a response agent
Carries and operates weapons as specified in daily post and detail orders
Participating in advance security preparations
Manning the security post at principal’s residence or manning the command post
Maintaining protective formation position during principal’s walking movements
Serves as a member of an emergency response team or quick reaction force
Perform personnel protective service detail assignments
Must have attended a (PSS) training course and must provide a certification
Shall maintain weapons qualifications as outlined in this contract (TBD)

Job Type: Contract
Required experience: Personal Security Specialist: 3 years
Required license or certification: WPS / PSD Certification Required
Required education: High school or equivalent
Required language: Spanish

Job Requirements
U.S. Citizen
Current U.S. issued passport and driver's license
Level 3 Spanish proficiency (Required) (No Exceptions)
Three (3) years of (PSS) (PSD) experience (Required) (No Exceptions)
Experience shall be gained from any PMC providing high threat protective services
Pay: We offer competitive pay for the region. (You will be a 1099 Contractor)
All candidates SHALL pass pre-deployment medical screening, all candidates will work in a high-threat environment under semi-permissive conditions, and employment will be based on customer approval, background investigation, and drug screening results, medical requirements, physical fitness, and experience levels.

Desired Skills:
Strong written and oral presentation skills, Excellent interpersonal and communication skills, Excellent organization skills, Proven ability to work both collaboratively and autonomously Strong initiative, Ability to collaborate and work as a team, Ability to work under pressure and meet tight deadlines.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:
A high school diploma or GED. Prior law enforcement or military service is a requirement. Background in weapons training, handling and manipulation. High threat area driving knowledge required. Recent CQB and active shooter training.

ADDITIONAL NOTES:
Felony or Misdemeanor convictions are immediate disqualification from employment consideration. Provide salary requirements with your application. Incomplete applications will be rejected. Also provide your States DMV Record, a Police Clearance Letter and DD 214 (Copy 4) if prior military. If prior Law Enforcement please provide a proof of employment letter from your respective department.

All your information will be kept confidential according to EEO guidelines.

visit www.rypulassessments.com for additional information and open positions.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Mexican cartel leader killed in the US

http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2016/04/10/feds-unusual-to-find-high-ranking-cartel-leaders-seeking-temporary-haven-in/

Wednesday, March 23, 2016