Showing posts with label government operations. Show all posts
Showing posts with label government operations. Show all posts

Monday, November 13, 2017

RYPUL- A Threat Elimination Professionals Serving Southern California

“Get in Contact with Former Police Officers and Government Trained Security Professionals”

LOS ANGELES - Aug. 29, 2017 - In the past few years, the threat of terrorism has been a major concern for many people around the world. Terrorism like no any other organized group has very unique characteristics that are making it one of the biggest threats to the safety of general public and individuals playing important roles in the society.

Based out of Southern California, RYPUL is a threat Assessment Company structured to evaluate physical, residential, school campus or commercial property risks. The Californian threat elimination professionals have announced the addition of a new easy to use a feature called “ARRIVE SAFE”.

Arrive Safe is a professional and personalized security services organized for those who feel less comfortable when returning to an empty home, business, apartment or rental property after an extended time away, for fear of being accosted by some unwanted person who could be waiting inside.



RYPUL, the experts in risk management, personals security, loss mitigation, school campus assessments and law enforcement active shooter training, have provided these services to several international governments, small and large business owners in a variety of markets, school systems and private individuals around the world.

RYPUL states that “There is a growing need for affordable, on-call personal protective services that the average American can use, especially since your local police officer won't respond simply just to "check out your home" because you feel uneasy.  Statistics show that 1 out 3 residential assaults are a result of burglary, 85% of break-ins are from desperate and dangerous people, 4 of 10 sexual assaults take place at the victim's home and 1 burglary occurs in the U.S. every 15 seconds.  RYPUL can provide the average person with an armed former law enforcement officer or government trained security professional to walk into and through homes, apartments, businesses or rental properties.”

To learn more, please visit www.rypulassessments.com or Call (888) 818-2790 To Schedule a Service.


About RYPUL THREAT ASSESSMENTS

It is a global security services provider.   Our expertise has been earned through security operations around the world.  Our network of security professionals can design customized, individualized protective security products at a moment's notice.

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Contact
RyPul Threat Assessments
Phone: 888-818-2790
Email: contact@rypulassessments.com

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Marines get groundbreaking, unstoppable new rifle magazine

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/01/12/marines-get-groundbreaking-unstoppable-new-rifle-magazine.html

A reliable weapon can be the difference between life and death for those serving in the military.

The Magpul Industries PMAG GEN 3 is a magazine for rifles that ensures the user stays lethal in a fight. More than 20,000 rounds fired? No problem. Still no magazine stoppages.

Why is that so important? Because every time a stoppage happens with a weapon, it means a lost opportunity to neutralize an enemy combatant. But the even bigger issue is that a stoppage can put the warfighter at risk and even lead to loss of life.

With AR, M4, and M27 weapons for example, magazine problems are a primary culprit in stoppages. But if a warfighter uses the PMAG, then the risk of stoppage is massively reduced.

The US Marine Corps has made the decision to ensure that all Marines have the best magazine available. Going forward, Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 has become the official magazine, giving Marines that extra advantage to stay alive and lethal in a firefight.

This is the first commercial magazine adopted as the official standard for the Marine Corps primary service rifle, Magpul explained.

Magpul has also introduced the PMAG GEN 3 in the “medium coyote tan” color. The black and medium coyote tan are now the only magazines authorized by the USMC for combat and training. The government-designed EPM USGI (aluminum) magazine will be used only for training purposes.



PMAG GEN 3 Basics

The PMAG GEN 3 would be ideal for the M4, M16, M27IAR (Infantry Automatic Rifle) and M249 SAW (Squad Automatic Weapon). And the magazine works with all types of bullets.

And in spite of tens of thousands of rounds, it won’t melt because of its special advanced material.

The military put the PMAG GEN 3 through years of testing, and thousands and thousands and thousands of rounds. And what did they find? No stoppages.

For example, testing found that even in 20,400 rounds of M855A1— a tricky ammo type— still there were zero stoppages.

Both the US and NATO have what’s called “rough handling” testing and Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 passed all of it with flying colors.

What does mean? It is one rugged magazine. You can use it in extreme cold— as in -60 degrees Fahrenheit cold— all the way through to 180 degrees of extreme heat, and this magazine still cannot be stopped. It is reliable.

The magazine also easily passed military testing against things like dust, UV exposure and even salt fog. You can also throw whatever dirt and grime is around and it will still outperform other magazine options.

So how does it work?

The PMAG GEN 3 loads from stripper clips. It inserts rapidly on a closed vault with a full 30 rounds. There is a smart over-insertion stop to protect against hard-core magazine changes and drops.

When you’re shooting, there is a handy window that Magpul describes as working like a gas gage. As you fire, it will provide exact data on just how many rounds you have left by a quick glance at the orange coil.



This magazine drops free, making reload very quick and efficient. There’s a dust and impact cover, but you don’t need it to store the magazine loaded. It is really there to protect against major impact like dropping the mags out of aircraft, for example.

Unlike the USGI aluminum magazine, it is very easy to disassemble to clean.

Dominating the field and winning the Marine Corps contract

In battery after battery of military testing over the course of several years, the PMAG GEN M3 relentlessly dominated the competition. In tens of thousands of rounds, there were zero magazine-related stoppages and it performed better than any other magazine. The GEN M3 was pitted against both government developed USGI and commercial mags— but none could come close to rivaling the PMAG GEN 3’s relentlessly reliable performance.

Magpul is highly motivated to find top-notch solutions for warfighters. Founder Richard Fitzpatrick was Marine Reconnaissance, many at the company served in the Corps, and have children currently serving. This is a company that understands the needs of those serving in the US military and takes delivering excellence extremely seriously.

“Firearm performance is a passion for us at Magpul, whether for military weapon systems or for civilian arms for defense and recreation,” Duane Liptak, Magpul Industries’ product management and marketing director, said. “Very early in the company history, Magpul’s founders identified shortcomings in the USGI magazine, and we’ve been dedicated to making the most reliable magazines in the world because although it may seem like a simple box with a spring, people’s lives depend heavily on this item performing.”

What’s next for Magpul? For civilians, there will be some very big reveals at SHOT Show next week. To find out first, download the latest Tactical Talk and meet a former Marine Corps fighter pilot who will give you an exclusive peek at some of the exciting news.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

US Army testing a device that could give soldiers a 'third arm'

Traditional weaponry has often been a burden to soldiers, placing added weight on their bodies, slowing reaction at times when all of their facilities are needed. Future troops may wind up having a “third arm” to help offset the weight.

The Army Research Laboratory is testing a device that attaches to ground troops’ protective vests, potentially letting Soldiers’ hands be freed up for other tasks.

NFL PLAYERS AND COMBAT VETERANS JOIN FORCES TO SAVE LIVES

"We're looking at a new way for the Soldier to interface with the weapon," Zac Wingard, a mechanical engineer for the lab's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate told the U.S. Army's website. "It is not a product; it is simply a way to study how far we can push the ballistic performance of future weapons without increasing Soldier burden."



The goal of the device would put all of the weight on a soldier’s body, allowing them to potentially have a more lethal weapon, perhaps adding as much as 20 pounds to their traditional combat load of more than 110 pounds, while not adding any burden.

"With this configuration right now, we can go up to 20 pounds and take all of that weight off of the arms," added Dan Baechle, a mechanical engineer.

The device is made out of carbon fiber composite and it can be used in the prone position on either side of a soldier’s body. It could also improve accuracy and potentially help soldiers deal with recoil, but further testing is needed.

Currently, researchers are using an M4 carbine to test the device, but other weapons, such as a M249 squad automatic weapon or M240B machine gun may also be tested.

Monday, March 20, 2017

New survey shows majority of US troops has 'unfavorable' view of Obama's years

A new survey shows that a majority of U.S. service members has an "unfavorable" view of President Obama and his eight years in the White House.

The survey released Sunday by the Military Times and Syracuse University’s Institute for Veterans and Military Families found 51.5 percent of service members have an unfavorable view of the Democratic president -- 29.1 percent with a “very” unfavorable view and 22.4 percent with a “somewhat” unfavorable opinion.

Roughly 36 percent of the members from all four military branches had a favorable view, while 12 percent were “neutral.”



Responses were based on a voluntary, confidential online survey of 1,664 active-duty troops that are a part of Military Times subscriber base, from Dec. 16 to 21. The margin of error for questions on Obama’s popularity is 2 percent. Other questions have slightly higher margins of error.

Obama’s supporters perceive him as a Nobel Peace Prize winner who hunted and killed 9-11 terrorist Osama bin Laden and a president who improved military strategy amid an uncooperative Congress and unprecedented budget restrictions, according to the Gannet-owned Military Times.   

Among the concerns of critics was troop levels under Obama being cut to historically low levels and the president’s decision to withdraw combat troops from Iraq, essentially making America less safe.

In addition, more than 60 percent of the respondents thought Obama’s use of drones and Special Forces teams for precision strikes -- instead of large-scale military operations -- has helped U.S. national security, according to MilitaryTimes.com.

Obama disagrees with the argument that tighter budgets have ruined the services, according to the Military Times.

“Our Army, tested by years of combat, is the best-trained and best-equipped land force on the planet,” the publication quoted him last week as saying. “Our Navy is the largest and most lethal in the world. … Our Coast Guard is the finest in the world.”

James Jay Carafano, an international studies expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation, told the publication: “There’s no question this era will go down as the third ‘hollow’ army, and it’s the president’s fault. ... For all his promises, the operations tempo hasn’t gone down as much as he hoped, and he has invested little in the military.” 

Military officers had a higher opinion of Obama, compared to enlisted personnel, 44-to-35 percent.

And the Marine Corp collectively had the least favorable opinion, at 60 percent, compared to the Navy’s 46 percent, which was the highest among the four military branches, according to the survey. 

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

The New American Strategy Should Be Disengagement In The World

In the never ending war against dictators, terrorism, it off-shoots and splinter groups, the United States is expected by every western government to lead the charge and carry the battle standards for conflicts against every dangerous ideologue in the world.

Since WWII the United States has been directly responsible for between 10 to 15 million war deaths in the Korean, Vietnam, Iraq Wars (2) as well as fatalities in Cambodia and Laos. The U.S. Government by proxy wars have been responsible for another 9-14 million deaths in Afghanistan, Angola, The DRC, East Timor, Guatemala, Indonesia, Pakistan and Sudan, which brings our countries total death by conflict since WWII to somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 – 30 million deaths from wars scattered around the world.



Now some of these conflicts have been fought for the greater good, and some not so much so, but at what point does war and death become a lost cause in itself?  Isn’t 20-30 millions deaths enough for us to say, let Europe and the rest of the world “lead from the front ” on wars, police actions, military engagements, short tactical operations and the fallout of both?

I for one don’t consider it a weakness for the U.S. to disengage from each and every conflict that modern man has become engaged in, only to have our best and brightest killed off for an uncertain peace time and time again.  The warrior culture is alive and well in America and we all would all be better served to place limits on how many generations of our youth we want engaged in perpetual war.



As a former member of the U.S. Military who entered service in 1987, I was on active duty for the overthrow of Panamanian dictator Noriega in 1989, the 1991 Gulf War, the 1993 Somalia incursion and the Bosnian conflict of 1994.  As a police officer in Los Angeles from 1994 to 2006, I was often on the other end of the tactics employed in war, used against me in the inner cities, by those who had gone to war and come home to become home grown terrorist’s as gang members. And most recently I have worked in the capacity of a security contractor in the middle east providing security for diplomats and other NGO’s throughout the region, so I understand all of the nuances that leave the Middle East a fertile ground for combat and strife, and I for one do not believe that modern man has the capacity to solve religious disputes that have evolved over thousands of years.



The world has been engaged in Middle East peace talks since 1949, with no concrete solutions in sight and until the people in those regions began to have dialogue on a human level, you can expect the bloodshed to continue on a daily basis, and the power brokers in the region need to install the peace NOT the United States, because we cannot, and yes even with all of our military might we cannot.

I have heard all the rhetoric for war from my enlistment in 1987 until today and it continues to be the same, it is usually the ” US vs THEM ” mantra, which works well on the highly uninformed and war hawks, yeah those war hawks in our government that will not send their own children off to fight for the latest war cause that they believe in so highly.



I absolutely believe in defense of our country, but only for the imminent, immediate protection of the American people on American soil, and I no longer believe we should have the protective buffer of American boots on the ground around the world, for the peace and security of Europe, The Middle East, Asia or the African Continent, even with overwhelming support from any government that wants our government to engage in combat operations.  If other countries believe that their peace and stability is threatened by a wolf at the door, then let those countries arm, outfit and send their young men and women off to war to defend it’s way of life.  We can and should honor our diplomatic agreement’s to aid our allies in a time of war, but we as Americans cannot continue to police the world, because the latest splinter group with the newest scary name pops up and says “boo”.

Yes we have to deal with the extremism that continues to plot attacks against our homeland, and we have the most capable special forces operators in the world to do that, on a surgical strike case by case basis. However the large scale company and division size combat operations should be a thing of the past for the U.S. unless we have a nation on our shores intent on immediate invasion of our homeland.

A little bit of isolationism at this point in human history is probably just what the doctor has ordered.

i·so·la·tion·ism (ˌīsəˈlāSHəˌnizəm/Submit ) (noun) : a policy of remaining apart from the affairs or interests of other groups, especially the political affairs of other countries.

So before the comments began, lets get a few things straight.

I am not a coward, I am a patriot.
I am not afraid of combat, I have served.
I am not an appeaser, I believe you kill before being killed.
I am not shortsighted, I understand nuance.
I am an American.

Written By:
Warren Pulley, CEO
RyPul Threat Assessments
An International Protection and Assessment Company

Monday, August 29, 2016

Holliston Man Charged in Connection with Weapons Trove

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, August 29, 2016
Holliston Man Charged in Connection with Weapons Trove

BOSTON – A Holliston man was arrested early Saturday morning in connection with his possession of a trove of weapons, ammunition and incendiary material, and his threats to use them.

Joseph Garguilo, 40, was charged in a criminal complaint with being a prohibited person in possession of ammunition.  Garguilo is scheduled to appear before U.S. District Court Magistrate Judge Jennifer C. Boal in Boston today at 2:30 p.m.                                                                      

According to the charging documents, on July 27, 2016, the FBI received information Garguilo had recently acquired parts to make an AR-15 rifle, and he was stockpiling other weapons including tasers, mace guns, hunting knives and thermite (an incendiary).  Around the same time Garguilo allegedly stated that “he will plant a bomb in police station…and kill as many homeland security officers as he can before they kill him.”  The FBI then initiated an investigation.  In recent days, the FBI learned that Garguilo had stated that he wanted to attack a mosque and/or kill President Obama.  Garguilo also allegedly said he wanted to, “chain a mosque closed and burn it down.”  Garguilo did not mention any specific mosque or time for this attack. The FBI also learned that Garguilo was stockpiling food and water as part of his plan, and that an acquaintance of Garguilo’s believed he was “about to snap.”



On Aug. 26, 2017, federal agents conducted a search of Garguilo’s residence and seized parts to assemble an AR-15 rifle, ammunition for the AR-15 rifle, nine millimeter ammunition, chemicals that could be combined to create incendiary or explosive compounds, and hand written notes threatening violent attacks against members of the Islamic faith.

As alleged in court documents, Garguilo is the subject of an active restraining order which prohibits him from possessing firearms and ammunition based upon a finding that “there is substantial likelihood of immediate danger of abuse…”

The charging statute provides a sentence of no greater than 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000.  Actual sentences for federal crimes are typically less than the maximum penalties.  Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

United States Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Mickey D. Leadingham, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives, Boston Field Division; Colonel Richard D. McKeon, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Holliston Police Chief John J. Moore; and Medway Police Chief Allen M. Tingley, made the announcement today.  The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Lori Holik and Mark Grady of Ortiz’s Criminal Division.

The details contained in the charging documents are allegations.  The defendant is presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.  

DoD Taps DEF CON Hacker Traits For Cybersecurity Training Program

Famed capture-the-packet contest technology will become part of DoD training as well.

The Defense Department for the second year in a row sent one of its top directors to DEF CON in Las Vegas this month, but it wasn’t for recruiting purposes.

So what was Frank DiGiovanni, director of force training in DoD’s Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness, doing at DEF CON? “My purpose was to really learn from people who come to DEF CON … Who are they? How do I understand who they are? What motivates them? What sort of attributes” are valuable to the field, the former Air Force officer and pilot who heads overall training policy for the military, says.

DiGiovanni interviewed more than 20 different security industry experts and executives during DEF CON. His main question:  “If you’re going to hire someone to either replace you or eventually be your next cyber Jedi, what are you looking for?”



The DEF CON research is part of DiGiovanni’s mission to develop a state-of-the-art cyber training program that ultimately helps staff the military as well as private industry with the best possible cybersecurity experts and to fill the infamous cybersecurity skills gap today. The program likely will employ a sort of ROTC-style model where DoD trains the students and they then owe the military a certain number of years of employment.

With the help of DEF CON founder Jeff Moss, DiGiovanni over the the past year has met and then picked the brains of, seasoned hackers and the people who hire them about the types of skills, characteristics, and know-how needed for defending organizations from today’s attackers.

DiGiovanni, who is also responsible for helping shape retention and recruitment policy efforts in the DoD, has chatted with CEOs of firms that conduct penetration testing, as well as pen testers and other security experts themselves, to get a clearer picture of the types of skills DoD should be teaching, testing, and encouraging, for future cybersecurity warriors and civilians.

This is the second phase of the development of a prototype cyber training course he spearheads for DoD at Fort McNair: the intensive six-month prototype program currently consists of 30 students from all branches of the military as well as from the US Department of Homeland Security. It’s all about training a new generation of cybersecurity experts.

The big takeaway from DiGiovanni’s DEF CON research: STEM, aka science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, was not one of the top skills organizations look for in their cyber-Jedis. “Almost no one talked about technical capabilities or technical chops,” he says. “That was the biggest revelation for me.”

DiGiovanni compiled a list of attributes for the cyber-Jedi archetype based on his interviews. The ultimate hacker/security expert, he found, has skillsets such as creativity and curiosity, resourcefulness, persistence, and teamwork, for example.

A training exercise spinoff of DEF CON’s famed capture-the-packet (CTP) contest also will become part of the DoD training program. DiGiovanni recruited DEF CON CTP and Wall of Sheep mastermind Brian Markus to repurpose his capture-the-packet technology as a training exercise module. “In October, he will submit to the government a repackaged capture-the-packet training capability for DoD, which is huge,” DiGiovanni says. Also on tap is a capture-the-flag competition, DoD-style, he says.

One of the security experts DiGiovanni met with at DEF CON this year was Patrick Upatham, global director of advanced cybersecurity at Digital Guardian. “I was a little apprehensive at first,” Upatham says. “After learning what they are doing and the approach that they are taking, it totally made sense.”

“He [Frank] is looking for a completely different mindset and background, and [to] then train that person with the technical detail” to do the job, Upatham says. “They are looking for folks who are more resourceful and persistent, and creative in their mindset.”

DoD’s training program is about being more proactive in building out its cybersecurity workforce. That’s how it has to work now, given that more than 200,000 cybersecurity jobs were left unfilled last year overall. DoD’s Cyber Mission Force is calling for some 6,200 positions to be filled.

The goal is to train that workforce in both offensive and defensive security skills. That means drilling down on the appropriate problem-based learning, for example. The current prototype training program doesn’t require a four-year degree, and it’s more of a “journeyman apprentice” learning model, DiGiovanni says.

About 80% or so is hands-on keyboard training, he says, with the rest is lecture-based. “A lot of the lectures are by the students themselves, with a learn-by-teaching model,” he says.

DiGiovanni gave an example of one student in the DoD training program who came in knowing nothing about security. The young man was a self-professed  “cable dog” at Fort Meade, a reference to his job of pulling cable through pipes. But when he finished the six-month DoD course, he was reverse-engineering malware.

“When he came to the course, he didn’t know what a ‘right-click’” of a mouse was, nor did he have any software technology experience, DiGiovanni recalls. “To me, that’s a heck of a success story.”

The next step is determining how to scale the DoD training program so that it can attract and train enough cyber warriors for the future. The goal is to hand off the training program to a partner organization to run it and carry it forward, possibly as early as this fall, he says.

Meantime, DiGiovanni says the DEF CON hacker community is a key resource and potential partner. “The security of our nation is at stake. I think it’s imperative for DoD to embrace the DEF CON community because of the unique skill they bring to the table,” he says. “They want to serve and contribute, and the nation needs them.”

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Is Undead Smallpox Reemerging From Siberian Graves?

As if the news that resurrected anthrax from thawed-out reindeer wasn't bad enough, increasingly warming temperatures are prompting renewed fears that permafrost could thaw enough to unleash smallbox from remote Russian cemeteries.

As The Siberian Times reports, this year the permafrost melt has been three times more extreme than usual above the Arctic Circle, causing erosion near graveyards of a town where smallpox wiped out 40 percent of the population decades ago.

Yet, some scientists argue that it's not the graves we should be worried about.



Scientists from Russia's Virology and Biotechnology Center (or Vector) in Novosibirsk are investigating the bodies, some of which show bone sores associated with smallpox. Fortunately, only fragments of the strain’s DNA were found, rather than any evidence of surviving smallpox. However, the center plans to conduct more research on "deeper burials" in the future, just to make sure. So far, luckily, that's been the case for years, as another expedition in 2012 found only "fragments" as well.

The effects would be devastating if it ever got out. Around 300 million people died from smallpox within the last century alone. But it's also a rare example of a disease that's been "completely" eradicated, as the last wild case of it showed up in Somalia in 1977. Even most of the stocks from lab studies are gone, with the only known ones shelved away in Koltsovo (just a few miles outside of Novosibirsk, appropriately enough) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia.

Scientists have been worried about its resurgence from graveyard thaws for a while. Back in 2002, Science magazine was telling much of the same tale, complete with gruesome details about digging up young, mummified smallpox victims, finding the pustules, and drenching the area with disinfectant so no one would be able to resurrect the disease.

In another piece from The Siberian Times, Sergey Netesov, a professor at Novosibirsk State University and the part-time chief scientist at the Vector, emphasized that he's less worried about exposure to the virus than infectious disease-carrying rodents infecting immunodeficient people, such as HIV patients.

Netesov, who was one of the first people to start checking the Siberian bodies for live smallpox in 1993, believes the worry about the thawing graveyards is overblown.

Netesov notes that the tombs in northern Siberia all lie very close to the surface, and the increasing extreme thaws paired with the usual extreme freezes "reduces the number of viable viruses from five to tenfold."

In a statement on Sunday, in the wake of the anthrax outbreak, Netesov reaffirmed that only "fragments" of smallpox DNA had been found. He added, however, that no one's supposed to be going near the sites with anthrax and smallpox victims anyway, but the region's harsh climate has often swept away the wooden fences originally erected to keep snoopers and livestock out. Even then, there's a danger of other diseases getting out.

If there is a danger of smallpox reemerging in Siberia, Netesov said in a statement to TRTWorld this week, it'll likely come from people who dig deeper, such as miners or oil drillers. And that's cause for alarm, as the warmer temperatures are facilitating such activities in the remote regions of the world.

"If it is true that these viruses survive in the same way those amoeba viruses survive, then smallpox is not eradicated from the planet — only the surface,” he said.

But in fact, the greatest danger from smallpox may not even come from the thaws, he says. Back in the '90s Netesov and some colleagues from the CDC discovered that smallpox genomes are very similar to those of cowpox, an ancestor of smallpox. Back then a Siberian milkmaid caught what seemed to be cowpox, but he regrets that they weren't able to determine its ultimate origins.

"'And since people are not vaccinated anymore, it is possible, as was once the case, that there will be a new transition of the virus from animals to humans," he said. "This probability is non-zero. Once it has been happened in history, it may happen again."

TOPICS: Smallpox Thaws, permafrost, siberia, climate change, plague, pathogens, anthrax, mass graves, infectious diseases, reindeer, Virology and Biotechnology Center

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

U.S. Special Ops orders new batch of low-profile pickups from Battelle

 U.S. Special Ops orders new batch of low-profile pickups from Battelle
By Gary GasteluPublished July 27, 2016FoxNews.com

And you thought your pickup was special.

Battelle has landed a second contract to supply U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) with stealthy, armored trucks built to blend into the background in potentially hostile environments.

Similar to the commercial security vehicles that Battelle builds, the trucks were designed to maintain their stock appearance while providing military-grade levels of protection.

The non-profit R&D outfit has been modifying Toyota Hilux pickups for SOCOM under a contract for “Non Standard Commercial Vehicles” that began in 2013. It will add foreign market Toyota Land Cruisers and Ford Rangers as the partnership is extended over the next five years through a $170 million deal for several hundred trucks.



The models were chosen for both their baseline capabilities and popularity in the theaters where they will be used. Program Manager Jim Labine says Battelle uses a combination of consumer aftermarket and custom-made parts to fully convert the trucks’ suspensions and beef up their drivetrains to improve their off-road chops and better handle the thousands of pounds of armor added.

That armor is a mix of Dyneema plates hidden under the bodywork and sapphire-reinforced glass. Several levels of protection will be offered -- all classified, of course -- but the most potent models can provide protection on all sides, top and bottom included, from large-caliber firearms and IED shrapnel. Self-sealing fuel tanks and run flat tires are also employed.

Labine says a major engineering challenge is fitting the inflexible materials inside the existing bodywork without encroaching too much on the interior space, or leaving any gaps in coverage. From the outside, the trucks are nearly indistinguishable from the showroom versions. The only noticeable difference on the Ranger prototype is its very slightly thicker window trim.

The new trucks will be evaluated over the course of the next year before production begins, overlapping with fulfilment of the original contract.

Paranoid, off-roading fanatics shouldn’t waste their time looking for the trucks at their local military surplus auction anytime soon, however. Labine says that the upgrades have the secondary benefit of extending their lifecycles, and, even if SOCOM doesn’t destroy the evidence when it finishes with them, you’d probably walk right by them on the lot, anyway.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World

LAW ENFORCEMENT ACROSS the globe use semi-autonomous technology to do what humans find too dangerous, boring, or just can’t. This week, the Cleveland Police had a few nonlethal ones on hand at the Republican National Convention. But even those can be outfitted to kill, as we saw in Dallas earlier this month when police strapped a bomb to an explosive-detonation robot, and boom: a non-lethal robot became a killer. If that thought scares you, you’re not alone. Human rights activists worry these robots lack social awareness crucial to decision-making. “For example, during mass protests in Egypt in January 2011 the army refused to fire on protesters, an action that required innate human compassion and respect for the rule of law,” said Rasha Abdul Rahim of Amnesty International in a statement last year arguing that the UN should ban killer robots. More than a thousand robotics experts, including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, signed a letter last summer warning against machines that can select targets without human control. We wanted to find out just how many of these things are in use around the world. But law enforcement isn’t exactly forthcoming about the topic, so this list is not exhaustive. Here’s what we found.




With the Republican National Convention underway, Cleveland police have enlisted the help of a new robot named Griffin, built by students from the local community college. Standing only 12 inches tall, the six-wheeled rover is designed to go places police can’t fit, like under a car or behind dumpsters to look for explosives. Griffin is equipped with a camera and light, which allows police to scope out the situation from a monitor at a safe distance. Unlike the larger bomb squad and military grade robots, like the one police strapped an explosive to in Dallas, Griffin is light enough to be deployed quickly without needing to be hauled out in a big truck. And it’s one of many robots Ohio police have on hand. Public records requests show Ohio law enforcement have received 40 robots from the federal 1033 program that transfers military equipment to local law enforcement.

India’s Riot-Control Drones
Police in the Uttar Pradesh region of India last year purchased a set of Skunk drones built to shower crowds with pepper spray and paintballs. The drone, manufactured by South African firm Desert Wolf, can hover mid-air over a protest and fire up to 20 paintballs (or other “non-lethal” ammunition) per second while simultaneously dispersing tear gas pellets onto people. Police control the drone from the ground, which levitates via eight motors that each power a 16-inch propeller. It’s outfitted with onboard speakers so authorities can communicate with crowds, as well as bright strobe lights and “eye safe” lasers to disorient and disperse a gathering. And of course, no drone is complete without surveillance capability. The Skunk comes packed with a thermal camera, an HD camera, and an onboard microphone, you know, to give the cops something to watch later.

South Korea's Prison Robo-Guards
Correctional officers at Pohang prison in South Korea had robot to help keep watch for them, during a trial in 2012.  Standing 5-feet tall, the Robo-Guard is equipped with 3D cameras and software to recognize inmate behavior. The robot’s makers say it’s able to report when something seems abnormal, like if there’s a fight or an inmate on the floor. The human in the control center can communicate with prisoners via the robot’s two-way radios. It’s unclear whether the robots were put into full-time use in South Korea after the tests, though recent reports indicate South Korea is now building robo-guards to keep patrol during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Isreal's Deadly Rover
This 26-pound, eleven 11-inch-tall robot is packing a 9mm Glock pistol. Designed by Israeli firm General Robotics Ltd with help from the Israeli Police Counter Terrorism Unit, the Dogo can fire up to five rounds in two seconds. This small land rover can enter a house quietly, climb stairs, and even maneuver over obstacles. Ready with eight cameras and two-way audio, the Dogo allows police to communicate with  and fire upon suspects without risking their lives, according to the company’s website.  If law enforcement aren’t looking to kill, the Dogo can also carry pepper spray or a dazzling light module to cause temporary blindness.

LAPD’s Huge Smasher
The Bat Cat—shorthand for Bomb Assault Tactical Control Assessment Tool—is the Los Angeles Police Department’s radio-controlled monster. Designed to pick up a car bomb with its massive, 50-foot telescoping arm, this unmanned ground vehicle reaches top speed at six miles per hour. While it might have been designed to remove massive explosives, the Bat Cat can also rip through a house in minutes, according to The Los Angeles Times,which reported that the LAPD used it to tear down the walls of a home during a standoff in 2011. Cops can switch out the end of the telescoping arm with a claw, a bucket, a forklift, or battering rams, and it can handle a payload of around 12,000 pounds, more than enough to haul your typical car bomb far from harm’s way. The Bat Cat was constructed on the chassis of a Caterpillar Telehandler, so it’s basically just pimped out remote-controlled forklift. Still, best to keep your distance.

Japan's Drone-Catching Drone
This is meta. Japanese police are using drones to take down drones, but they’re not shooting them. That would cause debris. Instead police are using a net. Japanese police introduced a net-wielding drone fleet earlier this year to catch suspicious looking small unmanned aircrafts that fly over sensitive government locations like butterflies. It takes a giant net to catch a drone, and the police fleet is equipped with a 6.5-foot-by-10-foot lattice. Last, year, the BBC reported that police deployed the net drones  in response to a drone carrying a non-harmful amount of radioactive sand that landed on the roof of the Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s house—a stunt that turned out to be a protest by an anti-nuclear activist. Japan’s drone-catching drone certainly seems a lot safer than the Dutch National Police Force’s solution—they trained eagles to take down unauthorized drones.

Brazil’s Olympic Peacekeepers
The Olympics are in less than a month, and Motherboard reports that Brazilian police forces are pulling out all the stops, including calling on a number of model 510 PackBots that were originally acquired in preparation for the World Cup, a military grade bomb detection and reconnaissance robot that was used after the Fukushima meltdown in Japan and was deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Each PackBot 510 weighs around 65 pounds and carries with it four cameras, as well as its main feature, a 6-foot telescoping arm that can lift a 30-pound payload. PackBots are primarily deployed for bomb detection and disposal; it can even use mechanical wire cutters attached to the end of its arm. The PackBot climbs stairs, maneuvers in water, and can crawl around at about 6 miles per hour, faster than most adults jog. With millions of people coming to town for the Olympics, Brazilian police will use the technology to inspect suspicious packages.

Democratic Republic of Congo's Traffic Robocops
In Kinshasa, the sprawling capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo,  The Guardian reports that city officials installed a handful of giant solar-powered robot traffic cops in 2013 in an effort to reduce deaths and get more people to follow traffic rules. Decked out in cool sunglasses, the massive humanoid robots stand at busy intersections as kind of an all-in-one traffic light/crosswalk/traffic camera. The robots direct traffic with arms that signal red and green flags, and usher pedestrians safely across wide, busy roads. The humanoids were designed by Women’s Technology, an association of female and male engineers in the DRC, and, like every police robot on this list, are installed with surveillance cameras. Theirs send footage back to police in an effort to deter dangerous driving.



Poland’s Tactical Bot
Polish police recently got their hands on a new reconnaissance robot to toss around. The Tactical Throw Robot, directly translated from Taktyczny Robot Miotany or TRM, is  meant to be literally tossed into buildings or dropped from up high to scout the scene with its camera, microphone, and various illumination options. This ultradurable robot is also ultralight; weighing less than four pounds, police can throw it into second story windows without any mechanical propulsion. The device is similar to Recon Throwbot used frequently by American cops, and is designed to be outfitted with stun grenades or explosives if need, which can then be triggered by the control panel used to drive the TRM around.

Border patrol between South and North Korea
The “demilitarized” zone between South and North Korea is paradoxically one of the most militarized places in the world, including South Korea’s fleet of semi-autonomous killing machines that patrol the border day and night. Developed by Samsung, the SRG-A1 is armed with a 5.5mm machine gun and grenade launcher that can detect targets two miles away with its sensitive heat and motion sensors, as well as low-light cameras for patrolling at night. Multiple reports indicate that the SRG-1 has a fully autonomous function, too.



A Life-Saving Robot For Refugees in Greece
The coast guard in Lesvos, Greece recently started deploying a robotic life-preserver to rescue Syrian refugees making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea. Refugee’s boats are often underpowered, overloaded,  and don’t have enough life jackets. Everyday authorities scramble to  save people from boats that have capsized, run out of fuel, or wrecked in the rough waters. The robot helping them is named Emily, an acronym for  Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard, and is a project by researchers at Texas A&M University. Emily is a floatation device that zooms across the water at 20 miles per hour tethered to a 2,000 ft. rope attached to a rescue ship. Emily makes fetching people who aren’t drowning faster, leaving the human rescue team free time to rescue victims who need more help.

By April Glaser  07.24.16  7:00am

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

US Navy develops 'Iron Man'-style AR diving helmet

Engineers at the US Naval Surface Warfare Center in Panama City, Florida, are developing a new diving helmet so futuristic it might seem straight out of Iron Man.

The team, led by Underwater Systems Development Project Engineer Dennis Gallagher, took inspiration from Tony Stark and put a high-resolution, see-through head-up display (HUD) directly inside a diving helmet. Dubbed the Divers Augmented Vision Display (DAVD), the system lets divers view in real time "everything from sector sonar [showing their location in relation to the dive site], text messages, diagrams, photographs, and even augmented reality videos" right inside their helmet.

Having this information within eyeshot offers divers a number of benefits, the team said. For starters, it can increase safety for divers out on missions, providing greater situational awareness and more accurate navigation to a target such as a ship, downed aircraft, or another object of interest. Plus, instead of having to rely on pre-dive briefings alone to determine what they're looking for, how items should appear, and where they're located, the system places this information right in front of their face. Inside the helmet, this information looks like a point-of-view video game display.



"By building this HUD directly inside the dive helmet instead of attaching a display on the outside, it can provide a capability similar to something from an Iron Man movie," Gallagher said in a statement. "You have everything you visually need right there within the helmet."

The system could be used for all types of diving missions, including underwater construction, salvage operations, and ship repair. Eventually, it could also potentially be used by first responders and commercial divers.

The Navy is also in the process of developing enhanced sensors that will let divers see underwater in higher-resolution, even when visibility is "near zero." In the future, this enhanced underwater vision system could be fed directly into the DAVD.

The team expects to start testing the DAVD in October.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Soldiers bleeding stopped with Injectable sponges for the first time from combat gunshot wound

Re: Posted by RyPul Threat Assessments

Firepower: Can these sponges save lives in under 20 seconds?

A U.S. military surgical team used an innovative device to staunch the bleeding on a gunshot victim, RevMedx, the company that makes it, recently announced. That marks the first documented occasion that the device has been used in a patient clinically, the company said.

The XSTAT, as the device is called, works by injecting numerous small sponges into a wound, which quickly expand and stop the bleeding. It takes just 20 seconds after contacting blood for the sponges to expand and staunch the bleeding, the company says, and they have markers in them to make them visible under x-ray, so that they can all eventually be removed.



The patient, a soldier, was reportedly shot in the left thigh, resulting in a “sizable cavity” in the leg. A forward surgical team struggled over the course of a surgery that lasted about seven hours to control all the bleeding, and decided to use the XSTAT. After they did, it stopped the bleeding almost right away, the company reported, and the patient— who had received both blood and plasma transfusions— stabilized.

"The first-in-human experience with XSTAT is the culmination of tremendous effort on the part of both RevMedx and our military collaborators," Andrew Barofsky, the president of RevMedx, said in a statement. "We are pleased to see XSTAT play a critical role in saving a patient's life and hope to see significant advancement toward further adoption of XSTAT as a standard of care for severe hemorrhage in pre-hospital settings.”

Click Here To See - XSTAT In Action

www.rypulassessments.com

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