Showing posts with label government security. Show all posts
Showing posts with label government security. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Physical Threat Assessment Experts at RyPul Threat Assessments






Site Threat Assessments
Physical Security Assessments
Documented Threat Analysis Reports
Vulnerability Assessments
Personal Threat Assessments
Site Security Surveys
Residential Security Assessments






RyPul Threat Assessments recognizes that one of the most important steps to providing a highly secure environment for our business, government and civilian clients in to perform a comprehensive, concentric security review of work, living, and business security procedures.  RyPul Threat Assessments then provides a customized physical security plan of operation designed to enhance your overall security environment and allow you, your family, employees or visitors the safest environment possible to live, work or recreate. 

As part of the security process, we elevate awareness with our clients as to their environments security challenges, the train our clients on how to best employ the physical security and risk mitigation measures we recommend. 

PHYSICAL SECURITY SITE ASSESSMENTS EXPERTS @ RYPUL THREAT ASSESSMENTS
Here at RyPul Threat Assessments, we feel that we provide the most complete and effective site assessments in the entire security industry and we design security operations that are flexible enough to adapt and change according to your security needs and desired functionality. Our approach allows you to gather powerful analytics about your organization’s strengths and weaknesses, evaluate results, and plan future security measure upgrades as the physical threats to your environment changes and morphs. 

Our objective in security risk analysis is to determine the effectiveness of each client’s current security controls that protect an organization's people, assets or property and a determination of the probability of losses to those assets, and the most effective means to thwart such losses. 

RISK MANAGEMENT EXPERTS @ RYPUL THREAT ASSESSMENTS

With RyPul Threat Assessments – Physical Security Assessment Services, you can more effectively prevent targeted threats to your business which gives you more operational insight, faster detection, real-time protection and better risk-mitigation options. We do all the heavy lifting so that you can worry less about in-house security skills shortages and focus on your core business operations, growth, and downline objectives.

SITE ASSESSMENT EXPERTS @ RYPUL THREAT ASSESSMENTS

RyPul Threat Assessments believes in the layered defense or concentric ring of security strategy to deal with and manage overly complex and difficult physical security situation that local security operations may find difficult to maintain. Many organizations spend thousands of dollars to implement physical security controls but do not evaluate them to ensure they are functioning as intended. Moreover, controls are often applied in an inconsistent manner, leaving security gaps. For organizations truly concerned about the effectiveness of their physical security controls, RyPul Threat Assessments identifies gaps and weak points that expose an organization to physical attack, workplace violence, active shooter and random physical risk factors.

Physical security controls are essential to protecting facilities, sensitive information, and personnel from natural and human threats. But ineffective or inconsistent controls negate the very protection they are intended to provide.

THREAT ANALYSIS EXPERTS @ RYPUL THREAT ASSESSMENTS

RyPul Threat Assessments was founded in 2011 on the standard of providing clients "Best Value" management consulting around security options from industry-leading security consultants.  RyPul understands that Security Assessments are an excellent way to evaluate your existing security program and a great first step to take prior to making security improvements at your facility or when trying to solve a specific security problem.  During a Security Assessment, all aspects of your security program are examined, any weaknesses are identified, and suggestions for security improvements are made. In addition, opportunities where costs can be reduced or where security operations can be made more efficient are identified. 

Our task lists include:

Physical Security Risk Assessments
Access Control Security Assessments
Barrier Placement Control Assessments
Risk identification and analysis
Threat and vulnerability assessment
Review of the site and facility security
Review of facility operating procedures
Review of physical security systems
Review of electronic security systems
Review of architectural security
Review of security policies and procedures
Review of security management
Review of security personnel
Evaluation of present security program and identification of any weaknesses and vulnerabilities
Development of recommendations for security improvements
Preparation of written Security Assessment Report



RYPUL THREAT ASSESSMENTS
CALL: (866) 838-6334
EMAIL: CONTACT@RYPULASSESSMENTS.COM
DETECT.DESIGN.DEFEND

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

RyPul Threat Assessments hired to assist Mumbai Metro projects with security system upgrades.


Southern California based company RyPul Threat Assessments has been approved to assist in security assessments and reviews for two new Metro corridors that are expected to bring the space-starved Mumbai much relief.


The much-awaited Thane-Bhiwandi-Kalyan Metro 5 corridor will finally see the light of the day with the state cabinet on Tuesday approving the proposal for linking the power loom town of Bhiwandi and expanding the Metro corridor in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR).

The state cabinet also approved the Swami Samarth Nagar-Jogeshwari-Kanjurmarg-Vikhroli Metro 6 corridor linking the Western suburbs with the Eastern suburbs of Mumbai. This will be the second West-East Metro corridor after the already operational Versova-Andheri-Ghatkopar corridor.

Both the approved Metro 5 and Metro 6 corridors link major industrial and commercial hubs along the route.

























http://indiatoday.intoday.in.u3a7.clonezone.link/mumbai-security-system-upgrades

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Marines get groundbreaking, unstoppable new rifle magazine

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/01/12/marines-get-groundbreaking-unstoppable-new-rifle-magazine.html

A reliable weapon can be the difference between life and death for those serving in the military.

The Magpul Industries PMAG GEN 3 is a magazine for rifles that ensures the user stays lethal in a fight. More than 20,000 rounds fired? No problem. Still no magazine stoppages.

Why is that so important? Because every time a stoppage happens with a weapon, it means a lost opportunity to neutralize an enemy combatant. But the even bigger issue is that a stoppage can put the warfighter at risk and even lead to loss of life.

With AR, M4, and M27 weapons for example, magazine problems are a primary culprit in stoppages. But if a warfighter uses the PMAG, then the risk of stoppage is massively reduced.

The US Marine Corps has made the decision to ensure that all Marines have the best magazine available. Going forward, Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 has become the official magazine, giving Marines that extra advantage to stay alive and lethal in a firefight.

This is the first commercial magazine adopted as the official standard for the Marine Corps primary service rifle, Magpul explained.

Magpul has also introduced the PMAG GEN 3 in the “medium coyote tan” color. The black and medium coyote tan are now the only magazines authorized by the USMC for combat and training. The government-designed EPM USGI (aluminum) magazine will be used only for training purposes.



PMAG GEN 3 Basics

The PMAG GEN 3 would be ideal for the M4, M16, M27IAR (Infantry Automatic Rifle) and M249 SAW (Squad Automatic Weapon). And the magazine works with all types of bullets.

And in spite of tens of thousands of rounds, it won’t melt because of its special advanced material.

The military put the PMAG GEN 3 through years of testing, and thousands and thousands and thousands of rounds. And what did they find? No stoppages.

For example, testing found that even in 20,400 rounds of M855A1— a tricky ammo type— still there were zero stoppages.

Both the US and NATO have what’s called “rough handling” testing and Magpul’s PMAG GEN 3 passed all of it with flying colors.

What does mean? It is one rugged magazine. You can use it in extreme cold— as in -60 degrees Fahrenheit cold— all the way through to 180 degrees of extreme heat, and this magazine still cannot be stopped. It is reliable.

The magazine also easily passed military testing against things like dust, UV exposure and even salt fog. You can also throw whatever dirt and grime is around and it will still outperform other magazine options.

So how does it work?

The PMAG GEN 3 loads from stripper clips. It inserts rapidly on a closed vault with a full 30 rounds. There is a smart over-insertion stop to protect against hard-core magazine changes and drops.

When you’re shooting, there is a handy window that Magpul describes as working like a gas gage. As you fire, it will provide exact data on just how many rounds you have left by a quick glance at the orange coil.



This magazine drops free, making reload very quick and efficient. There’s a dust and impact cover, but you don’t need it to store the magazine loaded. It is really there to protect against major impact like dropping the mags out of aircraft, for example.

Unlike the USGI aluminum magazine, it is very easy to disassemble to clean.

Dominating the field and winning the Marine Corps contract

In battery after battery of military testing over the course of several years, the PMAG GEN M3 relentlessly dominated the competition. In tens of thousands of rounds, there were zero magazine-related stoppages and it performed better than any other magazine. The GEN M3 was pitted against both government developed USGI and commercial mags— but none could come close to rivaling the PMAG GEN 3’s relentlessly reliable performance.

Magpul is highly motivated to find top-notch solutions for warfighters. Founder Richard Fitzpatrick was Marine Reconnaissance, many at the company served in the Corps, and have children currently serving. This is a company that understands the needs of those serving in the US military and takes delivering excellence extremely seriously.

“Firearm performance is a passion for us at Magpul, whether for military weapon systems or for civilian arms for defense and recreation,” Duane Liptak, Magpul Industries’ product management and marketing director, said. “Very early in the company history, Magpul’s founders identified shortcomings in the USGI magazine, and we’ve been dedicated to making the most reliable magazines in the world because although it may seem like a simple box with a spring, people’s lives depend heavily on this item performing.”

What’s next for Magpul? For civilians, there will be some very big reveals at SHOT Show next week. To find out first, download the latest Tactical Talk and meet a former Marine Corps fighter pilot who will give you an exclusive peek at some of the exciting news.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

US Army testing a device that could give soldiers a 'third arm'

Traditional weaponry has often been a burden to soldiers, placing added weight on their bodies, slowing reaction at times when all of their facilities are needed. Future troops may wind up having a “third arm” to help offset the weight.

The Army Research Laboratory is testing a device that attaches to ground troops’ protective vests, potentially letting Soldiers’ hands be freed up for other tasks.

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"We're looking at a new way for the Soldier to interface with the weapon," Zac Wingard, a mechanical engineer for the lab's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate told the U.S. Army's website. "It is not a product; it is simply a way to study how far we can push the ballistic performance of future weapons without increasing Soldier burden."



The goal of the device would put all of the weight on a soldier’s body, allowing them to potentially have a more lethal weapon, perhaps adding as much as 20 pounds to their traditional combat load of more than 110 pounds, while not adding any burden.

"With this configuration right now, we can go up to 20 pounds and take all of that weight off of the arms," added Dan Baechle, a mechanical engineer.

The device is made out of carbon fiber composite and it can be used in the prone position on either side of a soldier’s body. It could also improve accuracy and potentially help soldiers deal with recoil, but further testing is needed.

Currently, researchers are using an M4 carbine to test the device, but other weapons, such as a M249 squad automatic weapon or M240B machine gun may also be tested.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

How 'invisible armor' could defeat bullets and blades

Ever wonder if there was such a thing as transparent armor? It sounds like something straight out of a comic book, but it's something the Navy has actually created.

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scientists have created a remarkable transparent armor that is lightweight and still provides excellent protection.

Nearly as transparent as glass, the armor is essentially invisible protection from bullets. And if the armor surface is damaged, warfighters could fix it on the fly with something as simple as a hot plate and the armor will meld itself back together.

Think about how “bulletproof glass” (a misnomer since it is often only bullet resistant) works – you can see through it and it stops bullets.

Now what if you could do that for body armor and helmets? That’s the idea here.



This next-generation armor advance could also amp up transparent bulletproof walls to protect tourist attractions from the attacks we’ve seen in Paris and most recently, in London.

What’s the armor made of?

The transparent polymer armor gets its transparency from something known as tiny crystalline domains. The armor itself is made up of alternating layers of elastomeric polymer combined with a harder material substrate.

NRL scientists conducted tests using polymeric materials as a coating to try to enhance impact resistance.

By applying layers of the special materials to body armor and helmets, the result was better protection for warriors against bullets.

The armor also helped reduce the impact of blast waves caused by something like an IED explosion, which could potentially help prevent brain trauma.

When a bullet hits the armor

If you picture a windshield that has been struck by a rock kicked up while driving, the rock’s impact may cause damage that makes it difficult to see through the windshield.

One of the amazing things about this see-through armor is that when it's struck by a projectile, such as a bullet, it still retains its lucid nature. There’s virtually no impact on visibility and the damage is limited only to the spot where the bullet connected with the armor.

Repair vs. replace

The possibility exists that this futuristic body armor could be ironed back into shape after it sustained some hits, because of the material used to create it.

The material needs to be heated to around 100 degrees Celsius, which then causes it to become hot enough to melt the tiny crystallites. By heating the material, any impact from the bullet can be melded back together and returned to its normal state. Scientists believe that this sort of repair will not impact how the armor performs.

THIS FOAM STOPS BULLETS COLD AND PULVERIZES THEM TO DUST

Easy, fast repairs can be a great advantage for warfighters operating in remote locations and it can save money by repairing rather than replacing.

Implications for protecting against global terror attacks

In a scenario like the recent London attack, lightweight body armor approaches like the aforementioned can be very useful to protect armed officers from bladed weapons, bullets and other threats while the reduced weight can improve their speed, agility and flexibility of response.

Like the Capitol building in the US, armed officers protect the building and those working in and visiting the building. Based on the information provided publicly thus far, the terrorist wielded a bladed weapon and attacked British officers. One officer was tragically killed.

Guns and explosive devices are not the only methods of attack used by Islamic extremist terrorists. In Europe, terrorist plots and attacks have increasingly involved bladed weapons on foot as well the weaponization of vehicles.

Islamic extremist groups such as al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and the Islamic State group have been actively promoting these sorts of attack methods.

Just last month in Paris, a terrorist tried to launch an attack with machetes at the popular tourist site of the Louvre museum. A French soldier stopped him before there were any casualties.

In 2013, two terrorists drove at British Army soldier Fusilier Lee Rigby, who was walking a street in England. The terrorists then exited the vehicle, attacked him with blades and murdered him by hacking him to death.

Invisible Walls?

Ultimately, advances like NRLs in transparent armor could play a vital role in amping up “invisible” walls could be used to stop both people and vehicles from storming sites and areas. By enhancing protection, it could help prevent attacks and casualties.

Paris recently announced they are building an eight-foot bulletproof glass wall around the Eiffel Tower. Why? Tourist sites are attractive targets for terrorists. The goal is to stop not just bullets but prevent vehicles loaded with bombs from gaining access.

Transparent armor-ed up walls mean tourists can still enjoy an uninterrupted view while benefiting from enhanced protection.

Advanced armor like this can also become a deterrent to future attacks.

Allison Barrie consults at the highest levels of defense, has travelled to more than 70 countries, is a lawyer with four postgraduate degrees and now the author of the new book "Future Weapons: Access Granted"  covering invisible tanks through to thought-controlled fighter jets. You can click here for more information on FOX Firepower columnist and host Allison Barrie and you can follow her on Twitter @allison_barrie.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Immigration judges headed to 12 U.S. cities to speed deportations

By Julia Edwards Ainsley | WASHINGTON

The U.S. Justice Department is developing plans to temporarily reassign immigration judges from around the country to 12 cities to speed up deportations of illegal immigrants who have been charged with crimes, according to two administration officials.

How many judges will be reassigned and when they will be sent is still under review, according to the officials, but the Justice Department has begun soliciting volunteers for deployment.

The targeted cities are New York; Los Angeles; Miami; New Orleans; San Francisco; Baltimore, Bloomington, Minnesota; El Paso, Texas; Harlingen, Texas; Imperial, California; Omaha, Nebraska and Phoenix, Arizona. They were chosen because they are cities which have high populations of illegal immigrants with criminal charges, the officials said.

A spokeswoman for the Justice Department's Executive Office of Immigration Review, which administers immigration courts, confirmed that the cities have been identified as likely recipients of reassigned immigration judges, but did not elaborate on the planning.

The plan to intensify deportations is in line with a vow made frequently by President Donald Trump on the campaign trail last year to deport more illegal immigrants involved in crime.

The Department of Homeland Security asked for the judges' reshuffle, an unusual move given that immigration courts are administered by the Department of Justice. A Homeland Security spokeswoman declined to comment on any plan that has not yet been finalized.

Under an executive order signed by Trump in January, illegal immigrants with pending criminal cases are regarded as priorities for deportation whether they have been found guilty or not.

That is a departure from former President Barack Obama's policy, which prioritized deportations only of those convicted of serious crimes.

 A man, who was deported from the U.S. seven months ago, receives candy from his nephew across a fence separating Mexico and the United States as photographed from Tijuana, Mexico, March 4, 2017. Picture taken from the Mexican side of the border.  REUTERS/Jorge Duenes/Files
A man, who was deported from the U.S. seven months ago, receives candy from his nephew across a fence separating Mexico and the United States as photographed from Tijuana, Mexico, March 4, 2017. Picture taken from the Mexican side of the border. REUTERS/Jorge Duenes/Files
The policy shift has been criticized by advocate groups who say it unfairly targets immigrants who might ultimately be acquitted and do not pose a threat.

The cities slated to receive more judges have more than half of the 18,013 pending immigration cases that involve undocumented immigrants facing or convicted of criminal charges, according to data provided by the Justice Department's Executive Office of Immigration Review.

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More than 200 of those cases involve immigrants currently incarcerated, meaning that the others have either not been convicted or have served their sentence. The Justice Department did not provide a breakdown of how many of the remainder have been convicted and how many are awaiting trial.

As part of the Trump administration crackdown on illegal immigrants, the Justice Department is also sending immigration judges to detention centers along the southwest border. Those temporary redeployments will begin Monday.

'AIMLESS DOCKET RESHUFFLING'

Former immigration judge and chairman of the Board of Immigration Appeals Paul Schmidt said the Trump administration should not assume that all those charged with crimes would not be allowed to stay in the United States legally.

"It seems they have an assumption that everyone who has committed a crime should be removable, but that's not necessarily true. Even people who have committed serious crimes can sometimes get asylum," Schmidt said.

He also questioned the effectiveness of shuffling immigration judges from one court to another, noting that this will mean cases the judges would have handled in their usual courts will have to be rescheduled. He said that when he was temporarily reassigned to handle cases on the southern border in 2014 and 2015, cases he was slated to hear in his home court in Arlington, Virginia had to be postponed, often for more than a year.

"That's what you call aimless docket reshuffling," he said.

Under the Obama administration, to avoid the expense and disruption of immigration judges traveling, they would often hear proceedings from other courthouses via video conference.

The judges' reshuffling could further logjam a national immigration court system which has more than 540,000 pending cases.

The cities slated to receive more judges have different kinds of immigrant populations.

Imperial, California, for example, is in one of the nation's largest agriculture hubs, attracting large numbers of immigrant farmworkers from Mexico and Central America.

Bloomington, Minnesota, near St. Paul, is home to a large number of African immigrants, many of whom traveled from war-torn countries like Somalia to claim asylum in the United States.

(Reporting by Julia Edwards Ainsley; Editing by Sue Horton and Alistair Bell)

Judge Napolitano: What if the fix was in for Hillary at the Obama Justice Department?

What if the folks who run the Department of Political Justice recently were told that the republic would suffer if Hillary Clinton were indicted for espionage because Donald Trump might succeed Barack Obama in the presidency? What if espionage is the failure to safeguard state secrets and the evidence that Clinton failed to safeguard them is unambiguous and overwhelming?

What if President Obama never really liked his former rival whom he appointed as his secretary of state? What if he had no real interest in seeing her succeed him because he and his wife simply could never trust her?

What if, when Clinton suggested to the president that the U.S. wage a secret undeclared war against Libya, the president went along with it as a no-lose proposition? What if he assumed that if her secret war succeeded he’d get the credit and if her secret war failed she would get the blame?

What if the means of fighting the secret war consisted of employing intelligence assets rather than the U.S. military? What if Clinton concocted that idea because the use of the military requires a public reporting to the entire Congress but the use of intelligence assets requires only a secret reporting to a dozen members of Congress?

What if Clinton expanded her war by permitting American and foreign arms dealers to bypass the NATO arms embargo on Libya by selling heavy-duty, military-grade arms directly to militias in Libya? What if this was Clinton’s dream scenario -- an apparent civil war in Libya in which the victorious side was secretly armed by the U.S., with democracy brought to the country and Clinton the architect of it all?

What if the CIA warned Clinton that this would backfire? What if the CIA told her that she was arming not pro-Western militias but anti-American terrorist groups? What if she rejected all that advice? What if providing material assistance to terrorist groups is a felony? What if the Department of Political Justice actually obtained an indictment of an American arms dealer for going along with Clinton’s schemes?

What if Clinton’s secret war in Libya was a disaster? What if she succeeded in toppling the Libyan leader, Col. Moammar Gadhafi, only to have him replaced by feuding warlords who control anti-Western terrorist groups that not only failed to produce democracy but instead produced destruction, chaos, terror, torture and death?

What if Clinton managed her Libyan disaster using a non-secure email system even though she regularly sent and received state secrets? What if she sent many emails containing state secrets about her Libyan war to her friend Sid Blumenthal? What if Blumenthal had been turned down for a State Department job by the president himself?

What if Blumenthal did not have a government security clearance to receive lawfully any state secrets? What if Clinton knew that? What if the FBI found that Blumenthal’s emails had been hacked by intelligence services of foreign governments that are hostile to America?

What if there were terrible secrets that Clinton wanted to keep from the public and for that reason she used private servers and non-government-issued mobile devices? What if those terrible secrets involved her enabling the unlawful behavior of her husband and his shoddy, unlawful foundation? What if Mrs. Clinton made decisions as secretary of state that were intended to enrich her husband and herself and she needed to keep emails about those decisions away from the public?

What if the president recognized all this and authorized the FBI to conduct criminal investigations of Mrs. Clinton?

What if, after the ascendancy of Donald Trump in the Republican presidential primaries, the president warmed up to his former rival? What if Trump so got under the president’s skin that it drove him to embrace Clinton as his chosen successor and as the one Democrat who could prevent a Trump presidency?

What if the president sent word to the Department of Political Justice to exonerate Clinton no matter what evidence was found against her? What if, in response to that political interference, the FBI investigation of her failure to safeguard state secrets and her corruption took irregular turns?

What if FBI management began to intimidate FBI agents who had the goods on her? What if FBI management forced agents to sign highly irregular agreements governing what the agents can tell anyone when it comes to what they learned about Clinton?

What if the Department of Political Justice never subpoenaed anything from Clinton? What if it never convened a grand jury to seek and hear evidence against her? What if the FBI requires a grand jury to subpoena documents and tangible things? What if it is highly irregular for a major FBI criminal investigation to be undertaken without a grand jury?

What if the attorney general was involved in a publicity stunt with Clinton’s husband and then used that stunt as an excuse to remove herself and her top aides from making decisions in the case? What if this was a sham, done so as to make it appear that FBI professionals -- rather than someone politically motivated, such as the president or the attorney general -- were calling the shots in the case?

What if Hillary Clinton has engaged in espionage and public corruption and FBI agents know that she has? What if they have evidence to prove it but they could not present anything to a grand jury because President Obama wants Clinton, and not Donald Trump, to succeed him in office? What if this blatant political interference with a criminal investigation is itself a crime? What if, midstream in this criminal investigation, the fix was put in?

What do we do about it?


Andrew P. Napolitano, a former judge of the Superior Court of New Jersey, is the senior judicial analyst at Fox News Channel. 

Monday, January 9, 2017

Good Police Officer Kill Idiot Terrorists Attackers In Saudi Arabia

Hero police officer shoots dead two ISIS terrorists wearing explosive belts in a dramatic gunfight captured on camera in the Saudi Arabian capital

The dramatic shootout happened at dawn in the north of the capital, Riyadh
Police raid a house after receiving information of explosives being prepared
Bystanders were rushed into a nearby mosque as it spilled onto the streets
Despite the terrorists being armed with machine guns, an officer shoots them with a pistol

By Paddy Dinham For Mailonline
PUBLISHED: 16:50 EST, 7 January 2017 | UPDATED: 19:16 EST, 7 January 2017

Dramatic footage has emerged showing police officers and ISIS terrorists engaged in a shootout in Saudi Arabia.  The street battle began at around dawn, in the Jasmine district towards the north of the Saudi capital, Riyadh. Security agencies obtained information that there was a gang preparing explosives, and launched a daring raid.


A video taken from a bedroom window shows the terrorists, armed with machine guns, approaching the police car But the suspects inside refused to surrender and a gunfight ensued, as shocked citizens watched on from their homes. The terrorists, who were strapped with suicide belts, are believed to have taken a prisoner hostage in the incident. Those who were out in the street when the shootout started were ushered to safety into a nearby mosque.  A video taken from a bedroom window shows the terrorists, armed with machine guns, approaching the police car. They get right up to the vehicle, but as they do, one of the police officers manages to shoot them at point blank range with a pistol.

In the background, a woman can be heard crying hysterically as she watches the drama unfold. They get right up to the vehicle, but as they do, one of the police officers manages to shoot them at point blank range with a pistol.  The hero police officer is currently in hospital recovering from his injuries.


Pictures released by the state sponsored Saudi Press Agency purports to show the two ISIS militants, although no names have yet been released.

Saturday, October 8, 2016

Project 7 Security Group: a U.S. Leader In Personal Protective Security Service




LOS ANGELES - Oct. 8, 2016 - RyPul-- The United States – Project 7 Security Group (P7SG), a full-service legal U.S. Corporation dedicated to personal protective security and custom protection specialty for private sector clients throughout the country, this week officially opened their business for all interested and needing clients.

Comprised of protective specialists whom have operated and provided high-level static and mobile security services around the world, for US Government clientele, Non-Governmental Organizations, Multi-National Corporations, and a host of other clients, P7SG is ready to show the American populace what privatized security can do for their family's well-being.

"P7SG is perfectly positioned to answer the call for providing world-class security and to employ accomplished military personnel," said Brandon Gatewood, Founder and Owner of P7SG. "In a world growing increasingly dangerous from global terrorism and ISIS-related threats, people can't wait around for the government to have their back anymore. That's why we're privatizing our expert security services for everyone."


P7SG Press Release












P7SG is offering custom-tailored security management services for critical infrastructure assets, to include reviews and assessments of existing security systems, security audits, emergency and contingency planning, and secure document disposal.

Additionally, the operation is also providing trained drivers delivering high-level transport security and executive protection in armored vehicles. P7SG's drivers are professional trained and familiar with social, economic, political, and threat situations in any particular area.

"Our executive protection services focus on keeping our clients safe, secure, and in the know with regards to unforeseen threats and undercurrents," said Senior Vice President Warren Pulley. "We are committed to providing our clients with peace of mind in an increasingly chaotic world, and we want everyone to know they have access to our expertly trained and highly-professional security services."

P7SG also provides 24-7 protective services for high-level individuals, diplomats, executives, ambassadors, and foreign nationals.

P7SG is currently seeking interested investors please following the below link for additional information.

https://www.fundable.com/project-7-security-group

For more information, visit: http://www.project7security.com/.

Contact
Brandon Gatewood, CEO
Project 7 Security Group
800-560-3103
***@project7securitygroup.com

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

The New American Strategy Should Be Disengagement In The World

In the never ending war against dictators, terrorism, it off-shoots and splinter groups, the United States is expected by every western government to lead the charge and carry the battle standards for conflicts against every dangerous ideologue in the world.

Since WWII the United States has been directly responsible for between 10 to 15 million war deaths in the Korean, Vietnam, Iraq Wars (2) as well as fatalities in Cambodia and Laos. The U.S. Government by proxy wars have been responsible for another 9-14 million deaths in Afghanistan, Angola, The DRC, East Timor, Guatemala, Indonesia, Pakistan and Sudan, which brings our countries total death by conflict since WWII to somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 – 30 million deaths from wars scattered around the world.



Now some of these conflicts have been fought for the greater good, and some not so much so, but at what point does war and death become a lost cause in itself?  Isn’t 20-30 millions deaths enough for us to say, let Europe and the rest of the world “lead from the front ” on wars, police actions, military engagements, short tactical operations and the fallout of both?

I for one don’t consider it a weakness for the U.S. to disengage from each and every conflict that modern man has become engaged in, only to have our best and brightest killed off for an uncertain peace time and time again.  The warrior culture is alive and well in America and we all would all be better served to place limits on how many generations of our youth we want engaged in perpetual war.



As a former member of the U.S. Military who entered service in 1987, I was on active duty for the overthrow of Panamanian dictator Noriega in 1989, the 1991 Gulf War, the 1993 Somalia incursion and the Bosnian conflict of 1994.  As a police officer in Los Angeles from 1994 to 2006, I was often on the other end of the tactics employed in war, used against me in the inner cities, by those who had gone to war and come home to become home grown terrorist’s as gang members. And most recently I have worked in the capacity of a security contractor in the middle east providing security for diplomats and other NGO’s throughout the region, so I understand all of the nuances that leave the Middle East a fertile ground for combat and strife, and I for one do not believe that modern man has the capacity to solve religious disputes that have evolved over thousands of years.



The world has been engaged in Middle East peace talks since 1949, with no concrete solutions in sight and until the people in those regions began to have dialogue on a human level, you can expect the bloodshed to continue on a daily basis, and the power brokers in the region need to install the peace NOT the United States, because we cannot, and yes even with all of our military might we cannot.

I have heard all the rhetoric for war from my enlistment in 1987 until today and it continues to be the same, it is usually the ” US vs THEM ” mantra, which works well on the highly uninformed and war hawks, yeah those war hawks in our government that will not send their own children off to fight for the latest war cause that they believe in so highly.



I absolutely believe in defense of our country, but only for the imminent, immediate protection of the American people on American soil, and I no longer believe we should have the protective buffer of American boots on the ground around the world, for the peace and security of Europe, The Middle East, Asia or the African Continent, even with overwhelming support from any government that wants our government to engage in combat operations.  If other countries believe that their peace and stability is threatened by a wolf at the door, then let those countries arm, outfit and send their young men and women off to war to defend it’s way of life.  We can and should honor our diplomatic agreement’s to aid our allies in a time of war, but we as Americans cannot continue to police the world, because the latest splinter group with the newest scary name pops up and says “boo”.

Yes we have to deal with the extremism that continues to plot attacks against our homeland, and we have the most capable special forces operators in the world to do that, on a surgical strike case by case basis. However the large scale company and division size combat operations should be a thing of the past for the U.S. unless we have a nation on our shores intent on immediate invasion of our homeland.

A little bit of isolationism at this point in human history is probably just what the doctor has ordered.

i·so·la·tion·ism (ˌīsəˈlāSHəˌnizəm/Submit ) (noun) : a policy of remaining apart from the affairs or interests of other groups, especially the political affairs of other countries.

So before the comments began, lets get a few things straight.

I am not a coward, I am a patriot.
I am not afraid of combat, I have served.
I am not an appeaser, I believe you kill before being killed.
I am not shortsighted, I understand nuance.
I am an American.

Written By:
Warren Pulley, CEO
RyPul Threat Assessments
An International Protection and Assessment Company

Monday, August 29, 2016

FBI MOST WANTED - JOANNE DEBORAH CHESIMARD




Aliases:
Assata Shakur, Joanne Byron, Barbara Odoms, Joanne Chesterman, Joan Davis, Justine Henderson, Mary Davis, Pat Chesimard, Jo-Ann Chesimard, Joanne Debra Chesimard, Joanne D. Byron, Joanne D. Chesimard, Joanne Davis, Chesimard Joanne, Ches Chesimard, Sister-Love Chesimard, Joann Debra Byron Chesimard, Joanne Deborah Byron Chesimard, Joan Chesimard, Josephine Henderson, Carolyn Johnson, Carol Brown, "Ches"

Date(s) of Birth Used July 16, 1947, August 19, 1952
Place of Birth New York City, New York
Hair Black/Gray
Eyes Brown
Height 5'7"
Weight 135 to 150 pounds
Sex Female
Race Black
Citizenship American
Scars and Marks Chesimard has scars on her chest, abdomen, left shoulder, and left knee.
Reward:

The FBI is offering a reward of up to $1,000,000 for information directly leading to the apprehension of Joanne Chesimard.

Remarks:

Chesimard may wear her hair in a variety of styles and dress in African tribal clothing.

Caution:

Joanne Chesimard is wanted for escaping from prison in Clinton, New Jersey, while serving a life sentence for murder. On May 2, 1973, Chesimard, who was part of a revolutionary extremist organization known as the Black Liberation Army, and two accomplices were stopped for a motor vehicle violation on the New Jersey Turnpike by two troopers with the New Jersey State Police. At the time, Chesimard was wanted for her involvement in several felonies, including bank robbery. Chesimard and her accomplices opened fire on the troopers. One trooper was wounded and the other was shot and killed execution-style at point-blank range. Chesimard fled the scene, but was subsequently apprehended. One of her accomplices was killed in the shoot-out and the other was also apprehended and remains in jail. 

In 1977, Chesimard was found guilty of first degree murder, assault and battery of a police officer, assault with a dangerous weapon, assault with intent to kill, illegal possession of a weapon, and armed robbery. She was sentenced to life in prison. On November 2, 1979, Chesimard escaped from prison and lived underground before being located in Cuba in 1984. She is thought to currently still be living in Cuba.

SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ARMED AND DANGEROUS


Submit a Tip:

If you have any information concerning this person, please call the FBI Toll-Free tip line at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324). You may also contact your local FBI office , or the nearest American Embassy or Consulate.
Field Office: Newark

Submit an anonymous Tip online

Holliston Man Charged in Connection with Weapons Trove

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, August 29, 2016
Holliston Man Charged in Connection with Weapons Trove

BOSTON – A Holliston man was arrested early Saturday morning in connection with his possession of a trove of weapons, ammunition and incendiary material, and his threats to use them.

Joseph Garguilo, 40, was charged in a criminal complaint with being a prohibited person in possession of ammunition.  Garguilo is scheduled to appear before U.S. District Court Magistrate Judge Jennifer C. Boal in Boston today at 2:30 p.m.                                                                      

According to the charging documents, on July 27, 2016, the FBI received information Garguilo had recently acquired parts to make an AR-15 rifle, and he was stockpiling other weapons including tasers, mace guns, hunting knives and thermite (an incendiary).  Around the same time Garguilo allegedly stated that “he will plant a bomb in police station…and kill as many homeland security officers as he can before they kill him.”  The FBI then initiated an investigation.  In recent days, the FBI learned that Garguilo had stated that he wanted to attack a mosque and/or kill President Obama.  Garguilo also allegedly said he wanted to, “chain a mosque closed and burn it down.”  Garguilo did not mention any specific mosque or time for this attack. The FBI also learned that Garguilo was stockpiling food and water as part of his plan, and that an acquaintance of Garguilo’s believed he was “about to snap.”



On Aug. 26, 2017, federal agents conducted a search of Garguilo’s residence and seized parts to assemble an AR-15 rifle, ammunition for the AR-15 rifle, nine millimeter ammunition, chemicals that could be combined to create incendiary or explosive compounds, and hand written notes threatening violent attacks against members of the Islamic faith.

As alleged in court documents, Garguilo is the subject of an active restraining order which prohibits him from possessing firearms and ammunition based upon a finding that “there is substantial likelihood of immediate danger of abuse…”

The charging statute provides a sentence of no greater than 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000.  Actual sentences for federal crimes are typically less than the maximum penalties.  Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

United States Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Mickey D. Leadingham, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives, Boston Field Division; Colonel Richard D. McKeon, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Holliston Police Chief John J. Moore; and Medway Police Chief Allen M. Tingley, made the announcement today.  The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Lori Holik and Mark Grady of Ortiz’s Criminal Division.

The details contained in the charging documents are allegations.  The defendant is presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.  

DoD Taps DEF CON Hacker Traits For Cybersecurity Training Program

Famed capture-the-packet contest technology will become part of DoD training as well.

The Defense Department for the second year in a row sent one of its top directors to DEF CON in Las Vegas this month, but it wasn’t for recruiting purposes.

So what was Frank DiGiovanni, director of force training in DoD’s Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness, doing at DEF CON? “My purpose was to really learn from people who come to DEF CON … Who are they? How do I understand who they are? What motivates them? What sort of attributes” are valuable to the field, the former Air Force officer and pilot who heads overall training policy for the military, says.

DiGiovanni interviewed more than 20 different security industry experts and executives during DEF CON. His main question:  “If you’re going to hire someone to either replace you or eventually be your next cyber Jedi, what are you looking for?”



The DEF CON research is part of DiGiovanni’s mission to develop a state-of-the-art cyber training program that ultimately helps staff the military as well as private industry with the best possible cybersecurity experts and to fill the infamous cybersecurity skills gap today. The program likely will employ a sort of ROTC-style model where DoD trains the students and they then owe the military a certain number of years of employment.

With the help of DEF CON founder Jeff Moss, DiGiovanni over the the past year has met and then picked the brains of, seasoned hackers and the people who hire them about the types of skills, characteristics, and know-how needed for defending organizations from today’s attackers.

DiGiovanni, who is also responsible for helping shape retention and recruitment policy efforts in the DoD, has chatted with CEOs of firms that conduct penetration testing, as well as pen testers and other security experts themselves, to get a clearer picture of the types of skills DoD should be teaching, testing, and encouraging, for future cybersecurity warriors and civilians.

This is the second phase of the development of a prototype cyber training course he spearheads for DoD at Fort McNair: the intensive six-month prototype program currently consists of 30 students from all branches of the military as well as from the US Department of Homeland Security. It’s all about training a new generation of cybersecurity experts.

The big takeaway from DiGiovanni’s DEF CON research: STEM, aka science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, was not one of the top skills organizations look for in their cyber-Jedis. “Almost no one talked about technical capabilities or technical chops,” he says. “That was the biggest revelation for me.”

DiGiovanni compiled a list of attributes for the cyber-Jedi archetype based on his interviews. The ultimate hacker/security expert, he found, has skillsets such as creativity and curiosity, resourcefulness, persistence, and teamwork, for example.

A training exercise spinoff of DEF CON’s famed capture-the-packet (CTP) contest also will become part of the DoD training program. DiGiovanni recruited DEF CON CTP and Wall of Sheep mastermind Brian Markus to repurpose his capture-the-packet technology as a training exercise module. “In October, he will submit to the government a repackaged capture-the-packet training capability for DoD, which is huge,” DiGiovanni says. Also on tap is a capture-the-flag competition, DoD-style, he says.

One of the security experts DiGiovanni met with at DEF CON this year was Patrick Upatham, global director of advanced cybersecurity at Digital Guardian. “I was a little apprehensive at first,” Upatham says. “After learning what they are doing and the approach that they are taking, it totally made sense.”

“He [Frank] is looking for a completely different mindset and background, and [to] then train that person with the technical detail” to do the job, Upatham says. “They are looking for folks who are more resourceful and persistent, and creative in their mindset.”

DoD’s training program is about being more proactive in building out its cybersecurity workforce. That’s how it has to work now, given that more than 200,000 cybersecurity jobs were left unfilled last year overall. DoD’s Cyber Mission Force is calling for some 6,200 positions to be filled.

The goal is to train that workforce in both offensive and defensive security skills. That means drilling down on the appropriate problem-based learning, for example. The current prototype training program doesn’t require a four-year degree, and it’s more of a “journeyman apprentice” learning model, DiGiovanni says.

About 80% or so is hands-on keyboard training, he says, with the rest is lecture-based. “A lot of the lectures are by the students themselves, with a learn-by-teaching model,” he says.

DiGiovanni gave an example of one student in the DoD training program who came in knowing nothing about security. The young man was a self-professed  “cable dog” at Fort Meade, a reference to his job of pulling cable through pipes. But when he finished the six-month DoD course, he was reverse-engineering malware.

“When he came to the course, he didn’t know what a ‘right-click’” of a mouse was, nor did he have any software technology experience, DiGiovanni recalls. “To me, that’s a heck of a success story.”

The next step is determining how to scale the DoD training program so that it can attract and train enough cyber warriors for the future. The goal is to hand off the training program to a partner organization to run it and carry it forward, possibly as early as this fall, he says.

Meantime, DiGiovanni says the DEF CON hacker community is a key resource and potential partner. “The security of our nation is at stake. I think it’s imperative for DoD to embrace the DEF CON community because of the unique skill they bring to the table,” he says. “They want to serve and contribute, and the nation needs them.”

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Monday, August 22, 2016

"You call. We Meet. We Search. You Enter Safely!"

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Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Is Undead Smallpox Reemerging From Siberian Graves?

As if the news that resurrected anthrax from thawed-out reindeer wasn't bad enough, increasingly warming temperatures are prompting renewed fears that permafrost could thaw enough to unleash smallbox from remote Russian cemeteries.

As The Siberian Times reports, this year the permafrost melt has been three times more extreme than usual above the Arctic Circle, causing erosion near graveyards of a town where smallpox wiped out 40 percent of the population decades ago.

Yet, some scientists argue that it's not the graves we should be worried about.



Scientists from Russia's Virology and Biotechnology Center (or Vector) in Novosibirsk are investigating the bodies, some of which show bone sores associated with smallpox. Fortunately, only fragments of the strain’s DNA were found, rather than any evidence of surviving smallpox. However, the center plans to conduct more research on "deeper burials" in the future, just to make sure. So far, luckily, that's been the case for years, as another expedition in 2012 found only "fragments" as well.

The effects would be devastating if it ever got out. Around 300 million people died from smallpox within the last century alone. But it's also a rare example of a disease that's been "completely" eradicated, as the last wild case of it showed up in Somalia in 1977. Even most of the stocks from lab studies are gone, with the only known ones shelved away in Koltsovo (just a few miles outside of Novosibirsk, appropriately enough) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia.

Scientists have been worried about its resurgence from graveyard thaws for a while. Back in 2002, Science magazine was telling much of the same tale, complete with gruesome details about digging up young, mummified smallpox victims, finding the pustules, and drenching the area with disinfectant so no one would be able to resurrect the disease.

In another piece from The Siberian Times, Sergey Netesov, a professor at Novosibirsk State University and the part-time chief scientist at the Vector, emphasized that he's less worried about exposure to the virus than infectious disease-carrying rodents infecting immunodeficient people, such as HIV patients.

Netesov, who was one of the first people to start checking the Siberian bodies for live smallpox in 1993, believes the worry about the thawing graveyards is overblown.

Netesov notes that the tombs in northern Siberia all lie very close to the surface, and the increasing extreme thaws paired with the usual extreme freezes "reduces the number of viable viruses from five to tenfold."

In a statement on Sunday, in the wake of the anthrax outbreak, Netesov reaffirmed that only "fragments" of smallpox DNA had been found. He added, however, that no one's supposed to be going near the sites with anthrax and smallpox victims anyway, but the region's harsh climate has often swept away the wooden fences originally erected to keep snoopers and livestock out. Even then, there's a danger of other diseases getting out.

If there is a danger of smallpox reemerging in Siberia, Netesov said in a statement to TRTWorld this week, it'll likely come from people who dig deeper, such as miners or oil drillers. And that's cause for alarm, as the warmer temperatures are facilitating such activities in the remote regions of the world.

"If it is true that these viruses survive in the same way those amoeba viruses survive, then smallpox is not eradicated from the planet — only the surface,” he said.

But in fact, the greatest danger from smallpox may not even come from the thaws, he says. Back in the '90s Netesov and some colleagues from the CDC discovered that smallpox genomes are very similar to those of cowpox, an ancestor of smallpox. Back then a Siberian milkmaid caught what seemed to be cowpox, but he regrets that they weren't able to determine its ultimate origins.

"'And since people are not vaccinated anymore, it is possible, as was once the case, that there will be a new transition of the virus from animals to humans," he said. "This probability is non-zero. Once it has been happened in history, it may happen again."

TOPICS: Smallpox Thaws, permafrost, siberia, climate change, plague, pathogens, anthrax, mass graves, infectious diseases, reindeer, Virology and Biotechnology Center

Residents of New York's 'Murder Ave' Explain How the City Got Safer

By Amdé Mengistu

August 17, 2016


The author's intersection in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. All photos and GIFs by Alex Thebez of GIFRIENDS
Fort Greene, Brooklyn, has been my home for a decade now, and for the last couple years, I've raised my two young boys on Myrtle and Carlton, across from the Walt Whitman Housing Projects. We're on a border between tony brownstone blocks and rundown public housing. Our hood features aging homeless people, pot dealers and panhandlers. Gone, however, are the stick-up boys, gang fights and gunshots.
It's just plain old Myrtle Avenue now, but back in the 1980s and 90s, they called it "Murder Ave." These days, it makes for a picturesque scene—if you're looking for broken people sprinkled amidst New Brooklyn money.
Bill Bratton, who will step down as NYPD commissioner next month, tends to get much of the credit for this change. During a two-year stint in the same job under Mayor Rudy Giuliani beginning in 1994, he emphasized "broken windows" policing that went hard after so-called quality of life offenses like panhandling and turnstile jumping. Bill de Blasio appointed Bratton to the same gig after winning the mayor's office in 2013, and often gushes about his top cop on Twitter and IRL. The mayor isn't alone, either—from New York to LA, from the Post to the Times, Bratton is described as a seminal figure in American life, one whose obsession with tracking crime statistics neighborhood by neighborhood and block by block changed the city forever.
eCig gif.
There are no broken windows on my block anymore. When I asked the NYPD about the change, they offered data showing violent crime in the 88th precinct had dropped nearly 80 percent since 1993—and that my neighborhood saw 68 percent fewer murders last year than at the beginning of Bratton's first stint as NYPD boss. But to get a sense of how folks in the neighborhood perceive the man credited with making America's largest city one of its safest, I hit the block.
Phillip Campbell was born in 1977 and grew up on Lafayette and South Oxford, just across the park from Myrtle Avenue. "Well, the architecture is the same," he joked when I asked how the hood has changed. These days, you can pay $2300 a month for a studio in The Griffin, the pre-war building where he grew up. But in the 80s and 90s, Campbell told me, "There were prostitutes in the penthouse and crack vials on the floor," and his grandmother would never let him "go down those 100 steps" from the top of Fort Greene Park to the projects on Myrtle Avenue.
Campbell understands now that she wanted him "to feel like we had the chance to be middle class, but down there was the reality," he said. He doesn't have a great sense of Bratton as a public figure, but does recall how "Adolf Giuliani had two terms and it was so brutal." Campbell added that police would go where they knew there was poverty and "call them 'Hot-Spots' and put 200 cops there. You could get beat up for riding a bike on the sidewalk."



Booj on Myrtle Ave.
Two blocks away from Myrtle, every August for the past 23 years, Cook Green has run a summer basketball tournament for local kids on the playground at Dekalb and Carlton. "This was the worst neighborhood in damn near Brooklyn," he told me of the old days, adding that there were "real gangs here, Crazy Bishops, Comanches, Warlords, just to name a few." When I asked how that changed and when, he responded simply, "They hired way more police." But around 1997 or 98, he said, "You could get locked up for stupid shit—jaywalking."
Cook thinks that when Giuliani came around, "That's when shit went south. That nigger ain't give a fuck."
On Myrtle Avenue in 2016, you can have a smoke or a sip of Hennessy with kids that used to ball in Cook's tournament. One of them, known on the block as Booj, is in his 30s now, with a slightly faded neck tattoo of Myrtle and Adelphi street signs. He remembers the transition well, and actually thinks the biggest change came in the 2000s, when he "couldn't walk through the park without having to get stopped." Booj told me cops would target "only blacks though, even if whites were doin' the same shit, like riding bikes on a sidewalk."

Booj at the Bodega
It's more peaceful on the sidewalk now, but according to Othman al-Muntaser, the Yemeni bodega owner who sells Booj cigarettes and snacks, it's only been that way since about 2004. In the 90s, he told me, you could be robbed on the street "right in the afternoon, no problem." Asked to explain the change, Al-Muntaser snapped, "White people and Jewish moved in, what do you think?"
That reminded me of Booj's disdain for the cops and the change they wrought. He thinks they only cared to make the neighborhood safe for new developments like the Barclays Center, home to Brooklyn Nets games and big concerts since opening in 2012. "Jay-Z fucked up the 'hood, I always said that—write that shit down," Booj said. "They didn't clean this shit up for us."
There's an old church around the corner on Adelphi, where I stopped on a recent Sunday to see what the Elders had to say—maybe they were less antagonistic toward the NYPD and even grateful for the new way. Bishop-Designate Austin Craig Williams gave the service, and when we spoke afterwards, he recalled his father being robbed at gunpoint coming out of a barbershop on Myrtle. But Williams was on day five of his church's 21 Day No-Negativity Challenge, and said the neighborhood's changes had been a net positive. Citing "a concerted effort against crime," though, he told me it wasn't just about cops but also a real grassroots effort that had transformed the community.
Tony cuts hair at a place called Myrtle Avenue His and Hers. He was born around the corner in the Cumberland Hospital, between Myrtle and the Navy Yard. When I asked how long he'd been in the 'hood, he told me, "My whole life—I remember when we had the elevated train line," and pointed out to the sidewalk where the Myrtle El ran until 1969. "We had people change, drug change, social change, economic change," he said. Tony admitted that "this block was horrible" way back, but like every person I spoke to, declined to give credit to Bratton—or his cops. He suspects crime around here stems from economic need, and that hasn't changed. Rather than stamping out the problem, Tony thinks cops have simply moved the violence around.

Tony the Barber at his shop in Fort Greene
"They used to knock me on my head and take 12 dollars," he said, nodding his head vaguely toward the street. "Now they go into Walgreens and steal five tubes of toothpaste."
It's been a sweltering August on Myrtle Ave. You can watch a millennial nurse an iced latte while his bike gets tuned-up at a place that doubles as a café. You can see a homeless man from the Greatest Generation sit all day long in the B54 bus shelter. Back inside the barbershop, Tony eventually took to laughing at the very premise of my question—whether Bratton deserves credit for how safe it is here. Then the barber pushed himself slowly out of a chair and reached for his clippers.
"If you paint a dirty wall," he asked me, "did you clean it up?"
Amdé Mengistu is a recovering attorney raising two boys in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.