Showing posts with label alibaba. Show all posts
Showing posts with label alibaba. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

ICE: 124 illegal immigrants released from jail later charged in 138 murder cases

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has revealed that 124 illegal immigrant criminals released from jail by the Obama administration since 2010 have been subsequently charged with murder.

A Center for Immigration Studies report on the data from ICE to the Senate Judiciary Committee added that the committee is not releasing the names of the murder suspects.

"The criminal aliens released by ICE in these years — who had already been convicted of thousands of crimes — are responsible for a significant crime spree in American communities, including 124 new homicides. Inexplicably, ICE is choosing to release some criminal aliens multiple times," said the report written by CIS's respected director of policy studies, Jessica M. Vaughan.



She added that 75 percent were released due to court orders or because their countries wouldn't take them back.

What's more, her report said that in 2014, ICE released 30,558 criminal aliens who had been convicted of 92,347 crimes. Only 3 percent have been deported.

Her analysis is the latest shocking review of Obama's open-border immigration policy. And despite the high number of illegal immigrants charged with murder, the list doesn't include those released by over 300 so-called "sanctuary cities" and those ICE declined to take into custody.

Saturday, November 28, 2015

When should terror force a city to shut down?


By Juliette Kayyem, CNN National Security Analyst
The attacks in Paris were purposefully targeted to impact a city where people go to eat, drink, watch sports and listen to music. These were no military targets, embassies, mass transit systems, hotels holding foreign officials or government buildings.

Instead, restaurants, a sporting arena and a concert hall were chosen because they represent the very benefits of urban life and the vulnerabilities of a crowded space. The Paris tragedy is of such consequence because it was an attack focused on the young, the social, the future: the very heart of every city.

If this is the wave of the future, then every city is inherently vulnerable. What makes them vital -- their very openness -- also puts residents at risk. For public safety officials, what to do about threats in a city is a constant balance between the risk and the reward. And it is in this context that the decision for an indeterminate lockdown must be considered.

Soldiers stand guard in front of the Brussels Central Train Station on Sunday as the Belgian capital remained on the highest security alert level over fears of a Paris-style attack.     
Soldiers stand guard in front of the Brussels Central Train Station on Sunday as the Belgian capital remained on the highest security alert level over fears of a Paris-style attack.
This weekend in Belgium, in response to specific and presumably credible intelligence in the hunt for the Paris terrorists, Brussels went into lockdown. The decision has now been made by the Prime Minister to extend the lockdown through Monday, a work and school day, at the very least. The economic and psychological impact are immeasurable.

Belgium is in the midst of a counterterrorism mission, and we must rely on its good-faith efforts to protect the population and thwart the next attack. But Belgian leaders' decisions expose a major challenge in security efforts and one that needs to be prioritized for a future when most cities are likely to have to respond to threats of terror: How do you close down an entire city?

Terror alert raised to maximum in Brussels

Terror alert raised to maximum in Brussels 01:25
Given mobility of people and mass transit systems, cities can find it impossible to try to limit the impact -- or what we in disaster management call the cascading consequences -- of a shutdown.

Mass transit systems are a perfect example.

During the Boston Marathon bombings and the subsequent chase of the Tsarnaev brothers, city and state public safety officials believed it was important to shut down areas of Boston as they pursued Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. What they found, however, was that the system of mass transit was so intertwined -- buses leading to trains, and vice versa -- that to close down a single part of it was impossible. It was all or nothing. And they chose all, closing Boston and surrounding suburbs for a day.

Why planes remain a terrorist target
Why planes remain a terrorist target (Opinion)
This will be true for most cities.

Therefore, emergency response planners should begin to make plans for the potential of closures that are the least disruptive. Most training around city closures, especially in the context of snow storms or hurricanes, assumes that systems are either running or not. It may be in the context of the threat environment that leaders -- not just public safety leaders, but those in transit and design -- need to develop more limited responses.

But, assuming that isn't possible, the next step must be to ensure that criteria are well established for when a lockdown occurs and as importantly, when it will be lifted.

It cannot simply be that a terrorist has gone missing; that would mean every major city would be in constant shutdown. Such criteria could include the specificity and veracity of the intelligence and the likelihood that the attack would be thwarted by a shutdown.

Cities and nations must have very clear criteria for when and how they will reopen. In Boston during the marathon bombing in 2013, the governor reopened the city before Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was captured. The city struggled to explain how it could convince people that things were safe while there was a terrorist still on the loose.

As it turned out, it was because the lockdown was lifted that a suburban resident saw traces of blood and alerted the police to where Dzhokhar was hiding, suggesting that the "crowds" can often be used to help in counterterrorism efforts.

How GOP 'outrage' helps ISIS deliver its message
How GOP 'outrage' over refugees helps ISIS
I don't know, in the absence of a major arrest, how Brussels moves forward after Monday. The country is rightfully on edge, made more so by being told to stay put. The economic impact of a lost business day alone will be felt throughout the country and much of the EU.

The psychological impacts only aid the sense that that terrorists have changed how we live. Thus, shutting down a city is a tactic that should only be used in the rarest of circumstances, based on criteria that are known to the public and that are understood by those who implement them.

From public accounts, Belgium chose to close the city because of an imminent threat and the hunt for the terrorist, Salah Abdeslam, responsible for the French bombings.


Only they can make that judgment call, and there is no "right" answer about what they should have done. But, at some stage soon, there has to be a return to normal, and to do so, leaders need to publicly set the stage for how the city's engines of activity will start churning again, especially if the elusive Abdeslam is not found.

Worldwide Travel Alert For U.S. Citizens

SF Sniper Prepares for Operation
The State Department alerts U.S. citizens to possible risks of travel due to increased terrorist threats. Current information suggests that ISIL (aka Da’esh), al-Qa’ida, Boko Haram, and other terrorist groups continue to plan terrorist attacks in multiple regions.  These attacks may employ a wide variety of tactics, using conventional and non-conventional weapons and targeting both official and private interests.  This Travel Alert expires on February 24, 2016.
Authorities believe the likelihood of terror attacks will continue as members of ISIL/Da’esh return from Syria and Iraq.  Additionally, there is a continuing threat from unaffiliated persons planning attacks inspired by major terrorist organizations but conducted on an individual basis.  Extremists have targeted large sporting events, theatres, open markets, and aviation services.  In the past year, there have been multiple attacks in France, Nigeria, Denmark, Turkey, and Mali.  ISIL/Da’esh has claimed responsibility for the bombing of a Russian airliner in Egypt. 
0827-Venezuela-Amuay-refinery-explosion_full_600
U.S. citizens should exercise vigilance when in public places or using transportation.  Be aware of immediate surroundings and avoid large crowds or crowded places.  Exercise particular caution during the holiday season and at holiday festivals or events.  U.S. citizens should monitor media and local information sources and factor updated information into personal travel plans and activities.  Persons with specific safety concerns should contact local law enforcement authorities who are responsible for the safety and security of all visitors to their host country.  U.S. citizens should:
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.  Monitor media and local information sources and factor updated information into personal travel plans and activities.  
  • Be prepared for additional security screening and unexpected disruptions.
  • Stay in touch with your family members and ensure they know how to reach you in the event of an emergency.
  • Register in our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
Foreign governments have taken action to guard against terrorist attacks, and some have made official declarations regarding heightened threat conditions.  Authorities continue to conduct raids and disrupt terror plots.  We continue to work closely with our allies on the threat from international terrorism.  Information is routinely shared between the United States and our key partners in order to disrupt terrorist plotting, identify and take action against potential operatives, and strengthen our defenses against potential threats.
For further information:

Islamophobia Works in the Islamic State's Favor

Islamic State fighters in Iraq. Photo:Medyan Dairieh / VICE News
Four days after the horrific terrorist attacks in Paris, my team and I asked the audience of my BBC Asian Network phone-in show a question, as we do every day. This time, it was: "Will the Paris attacks make life more difficult for British Muslims?"
It had been less than a week since the terrorists of Daesh, or the so-called Islamic State, had gone on their murderous rampage. So, to some, it may have seemed insensitive to be asking so soon how British Muslims were feeling when French hearts from all backgrounds were broken and a manhunt to catch the surviving perpetrators was still ongoing.
Our reasoning was that what IS wanted was for discord to fester—for Islamophobia in the West to become deeply embedded, with the subsequent hatred and mistrust leading to more eager recruits being seduced into their death cult. So it was important for us to gauge whether or not they were succeeding in their aim. We also wanted to discover what it felt like on the ground for the average law-abiding, tax-paying, house-tending, car-driving, life-living British Muslim—or indeed British Asian, being that the average Islamophobe isn't going to ask a potential victim to fill in a questionnaire clarifying their religious viewpoint before attacking them.
The calls, emails, and texts largely portrayed a depressing picture. I remember a British Muslim caller talking about how his sister had told their mother to not go to the bank that morning because "white people may attack you." And this was not an isolated case of fear.
It is against this backdrop that The Sun newspaper printed its recent front page headline, "1 in 5 Brit Muslims have sympathy for Jihadis"—a conclusion the journalist responsible made after seeing the results of a poll that never mentioned the word jihadis. The survey's 1,003 respondents were asked if they had any sympathy for young British Muslims who leave the UK to join fighters in Syria. Did that include members of the British Kurdish community going to Syria to fight IS, or joining the Free Syrian Army who are battling Assad and IS?
On the Sunday night before the print copy of the paper hit the newsstands, some had already seen the front page online and tweeted about how irresponsible and inflammatory they felt it was. A British Muslim member of the public, who also happens to follows me on Twitter, tweeted "All 5 Muslims in our household despise extremists. Either me or @TheSun is lying. Only one of us lies habitually."
On Monday morning as people awoke to this headline, my debate show team knew that our listeners would want to discuss the impact it would have. We asked "Is today's Sunheadline a wake up call to British Muslims or irresponsible journalism?" Many sided with the latter part of the question, as did others in the media. That same day there were articles in other newspapers questioning the methodology and the very basic journalistic shortcomings of the piece, and it was beginning to look like a blatant piece of hate-mongering to some of my listeners.
The Sun replied to the criticism by stating that they had "published the poll's findings clearly and accurately, including the questions in full." A non-Muslim emailer called Karamjeet wrote, "The reporting in The Sun certainly doesn't surprise me, but the way it is reported is totally irresponsible and inflammatory." Another listener texted, "The Sun is very conniving... they were asking very leading questions, the answers of which could be easily manipulated." With more than a hint of frustration in her tone, another listener said, "Like those three monkeys, the media by and large chooses to stay blind, deaf, and dumb to those voices who speak out against extremists and terrorists. What do they want? That I renounce my faith? That I take up non-Islamic practices? Will that then assuage them?"
The fact that British Muslim callers have described how their work colleagues no longer treat them with the courtesy they once experienced, or that they are fearful for the futures of their kids, should act as a wake-up call to politicians and journalists that ill-conceived headlines have repercussions for people who just wish to practice their faith and go about their business. We all have a responsibility to confront hatred and bigotry wherever it exists, and at the very least do nothing to unnecessarily exacerbate the situation.
You only have to see the ridicule and backlash that The Sun has faced this week to realize that we are a tolerant nation. But for some of my British Muslim listeners, the fear is that those headlines will be read by some as gospel, tainting the way some of their fellow Brits view them. Instead, we must all unite and show solidarity, for that will only infuriate IS and help to quell the number of Europeans making the journey to Syria to join the terrorists.

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Uruguay an Important Weapons Source for LatAm Criminals?

The Santa Bernardina Air Base
The Santa Bernardina Air Base
An ammunition heist from an Air Force base in Uruguay points to corruption in the country’s security forces, and further indicates that the generally peaceful country serves as a prominent source of weapons for South America criminal groups.
Investigations by Uruguayan authorities found that roughly 18,000 pieces of ammunition stolen from the Santa Bernardina Air Base ended up in the hands of criminal groups in Brazil; including Rio de Janeiro’s notorious Red Command (Comando Vermelho), reported El Pais.
The munitions theft -- believed to have occurred sometime between November 2014 and February 2015 -- was made public on June 21 by Congressional delegate Jaime Trobo.
According to investigations, the stolen ammunition weighed between 650 and 750 kilograms, and was removed from the base through its main gate using a truck. During the months the robbery is believed to have taken place, security cameras, motion sensors, and electric fences guarding the base’s weapons depot were not functioning.  
Around 20 soldiers are under investigation. Mid-ranking soldiers and officers are also expected be implicated as investigations progress, reported El Pais. It is also possiblemore ammo was stolen than initially believed.
In 2007, the Uruguayan Air Force experienced a similar weapons theft, which resulted in four soldiers, three civilians, and one prison inmate being charged for stealing and organizing the weapons’ sales to Brazilian criminal groups.

InSight Crime Analysis

The theft of such a large amount of ammunition from an active Air Force base could not have occurred without complicity on the part of corrupt soldiers and officers.
While such instances of corruption are less common among Uruguay’s security forces, they are not without precedent. In 2012, around 20 police officers came under investigation for removing over 200 firearms from police stockpiles and selling them to Brazilian criminal groups. More recently, in April, three policemen and a businessman were arrested on suspicions they were trafficking guns to Brazil’s Red Command.
According to a 2009 report by the Small Arms Survey, while having the highest per capita civilian gun ownership in South America (one firearm for every three people), Uruguay has a relatively small collection of modern small arms (61,000). However, much of this inventory was found to be useless, owing to reductions in military personnel. The report also documented a surplus of around 80,000 outdated rifles, sub-machine guns, and light machine guns, which serve no function in Uruguay’s national strategy and whose status was unknown.
The existence of such surplus weapons stocks may prove too tempting an opportunity for some corrupt military officials. Neighboring Brazil offers a prime market, where evidence suggests groups like the Red Command have been seeking to obtain ever more powerful weapons. In 2013, 40 percent of weapons seized in Rio de Janeiro were listed as “category A” -- including rifles, machine guns, and submachine guns -- representing a 33 percent increase since 2009.

Mexico's Security Wins: Fact Vs Fiction

Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto
Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto touted security accomplishments in his State of Union speech. Some of his claims need some serious scrutiny.
Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto's state-of-the-union address
In his third State of the Union address the President acknowledged the last 12 months have been a "difficult year" for Mexico. He spoke of the 43 students disappeared in IgualaSinaloa Cartel leader Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman's escape from prison and accusations of corruption at many levels of government, including the Executive Branch
"These situations are all very different from each other, but they all hurt the spirit of the Mexican people and their trust in public institutions," Peña Nieto said. 
Defending his leadership through all this, the President presented a series of figures as proof of crime and security accomplishments. They included falling homicide andkidnapping rates and some of the lowest crime statistics in 17 years. 
Additionally Peña Nieto highlighted the capture of 92 figures on Mexico's 122 most dangerous people list along with improved coordination and intelligence sharing to combat organized crime. 
"We're not just capturing them, we're undermining their organizations and financial capacities," he said.
Looking to the next three years of his term, the President put forth a 10-point plan centered around improving security and the rule of law while also jump starting the economy.

InSight Crime Analysis

According to Animal Politico, Peña Nieto's claim of the second lowest crime rates in 17 years hinges on comparing two distinct categories of crime: "high impact crime" (mostly consisting of violent crime) vs total crime. 
Aside from statistical shenanigans, official crime figures may not reflect the facts on the ground, as evidenced by a recent Mexico victimization survey, known as Envipe, which pointed to large differences in the amount of crimes occurring and the number reported to authorities. 
If crimes do reach authorities there's no guarantee they'll be handled properly, according to a separate report by Animal Politico. Two out of three Mexican states reportedly had to revise their crime statistics this year. Some of the more egregious cases coincided with Mexico's major crime hotspots. For example, in May Sinaloa state announced it would add more than 10,000 preliminary investigations which had somehow not been registered over the last three years. Meanwhile in Atlantic-facing Veracruz state authorities admitted to failing to register nearly 300 homicides in 2013.
Further complicating the matter are Mexico's issues with forced disappearances. In February the Mexican government took issue with a United Nations report which statedforced disappearances (often involving security forces) are widespread and met with near total impunity. Many of these victims ended up in mass graves in which identifying the victim, and thus recording a crime, becomes difficult. 
Looking at the President's boast of capturing 92 of Mexico's 122 most dangerous people, it's worth noting that a number of those arrested were reportedly caught during the previous administration. 
The list itself has also been called into question after Mexico's Attorney General's Officeremoved 10 names from it. Those removed included Sinaloa cartel underboss Juan Jose Esparragoza, alias “El Azul,” and Juarez cartel leader Juan Pablo Ledezma. 
With Mexico's economy stagnating and Peña Nieto's approval rating at an all time low, it's to be expected the President would try and spin crime and security statistics in his favor. What is of real concern is his plans for the next half of his presidency.
The President's recent appointment of Renato Sales as Mexico's new national security commissioner raises doubts. Outlining his agenda Sales put forth prison reform and increasing trust in Mexico's Federal Police as top priorities. This leaves open questions on how Peña Nieto's administration plans to make gains against Mexico's fragmenting and evolving organized crime groups which may not be as susceptible to Mexico's previous strategy of targeting criminal leaders.  

Migrants Seeking 'German Life' Are Not Refugees, Says Hungary PM


The large numbers of people now seeking sanctuary in Europe should be seen as immigrants, not as refugees, because they are seeking a "German life" and refuse to stay in the first safe country they reach, Hungary's prime minister said on Monday, as he also rejected planned migrant quotas. 
Viktor Orban, a right-wing populist whose robust handling of the migrant crisis has drawn both condemnation and praise, said the European Union (EU) should consider providing financial support to countries such as Turkey which are near to the conflict zones so that migrants stay there and do not move on.
Syrians, Iraqis and others entering Greece, Macedonia, Serbia or Hungary are safe in those countries and, in line with EU rules, should have their asylum applications processed there, Orban told a gathering of Hungarian diplomats in Budapest.
"If they want to continue on from Hungary, it's not because they are in danger, it's because they want something else," he said, adding that the migrants' target was Germany and "a German life," not physical safety.
The vast majority of migrants reaching Hungary aim to travel on to Germany and other wealthier western European countries. A Bavarian official said Germany expected about 2,500 refugees to arrive by early afternoon on Monday after some 20,000 came in over the weekend.
Left unchecked, this inflow will place an impossible financial burden on the EU, Orban said, endangering what he called Europe's "Christian welfare states." He has previously said the arrival of large numbers of mostly Muslim migrants posed a threat to Europe's Christian culture and values.
"It's absurd... when the Germans say they will spend billions on providing for the new arrivals instead of giving the money to the countries around the crisis zone, where the (migrants) should be stopped in the first place," he said.
"It would be better for everyone. They wouldn't come here. It would cost less. And our approach couldn't be called into question morally either."
Watch Libya's Migrant Trade: Europe or Die (Trailer):

Europe's worst migration crisis since the Balkan wars of the 1990s has led many of the continent's leaders to call for a quota system to distribute refugees among the EU's 28 member states — an idea that Orban opposes.
While Hungary would remain part of the EU's passport-free "Schengen zone," Orban said discussion of a quota system was premature.
"As long as Europe cannot protect its external borders it makes no sense to discuss the fate of those flowing in," he said, adding that he did not rule out a "fair" discussion of quotas at a later stage.
He defended a planned package of laws that would allow the army to be deployed to defend Hungary's southern border, which he added was being threatened "perhaps not by war, but by being overwhelmed."
Orban said he hoped the measures would succeed in "hermetically sealing" the border, with people crossing at official crossing points only. Legislation to use the army in helping to protect borders would not be possible before September 20, he added. 
Oscar Velasco, of the Red Cross, captured this video near the Greek town of Idomeni, near the border with Hungary, on September 7.
The EU executive has drawn up a new set of national quotas under which Germany will take in more than 40,000 and France 30,000 of a total of 160,000 asylum-seekers it says should be relocated from Italy, Greece and Hungary, an EU source said on Monday.
European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker is due to unveil new proposals on Wednesday. EU officials have said he will propose adding 120,000 people to be relocated on top of a group of 40,000 the Commission previously proposed relocating.
Leading the quotas among the 120,000, of which 54,000 would come from Hungary, Germany would, if EU leaders agree to the scheme, be asked to take in 31,443 and France 24,031. Earlier on Monday, French President Francois Hollande said France would take 24,000 of the additional 120,000 people seeking refuge.
Confirming figures published by Dutch newspaper de Volkskrant, the source said the Commission also planned to put Turkey and all the non-EU states of the Western Balkans on a new list of "safe" countries, whose citizens would face accelerated reviews of asylum claims to speed deportation for most of them. 
Meanwhile, Austria said on Sunday it planned to end emergency measures that have allowed thousands of refugees stranded in Hungary into Austria and Germany since Saturday and move step by step "towards normality".
Austria had suspended its random border checks after photographs of a Syrian toddler lying dead on a Turkish beach showed Europeans the horror faced by those desperate enough to travel illegally into the heart of Europe, which is deeply divided over how to cope.
After 71 people suffocated in the back of a truck abandoned on an Austrian highway en route from Hungary, and as thousands headed from Budapest towards Austria on foot, Vienna had agreed with Germany to waive rules requiring refugees to register an asylum claim in the first EU country they reach.
Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann said that decision was being revised following "intensive talks" with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and a telephone call with Hungarian Prime Minister Orban, bitterly opposed to the waiver.
"We have always said this is an emergency situation in which we must act quickly and humanely. We have helped more than 12,000 people in an acute situation," Faymann said.
"Now we have to move step by step away from emergency measures towards normality, in conformity with the law and dignity."
Follow VICE News on Twitter: @vicenews

The Islamic State Claims to Have Hostages From China and Norway 'For Sale'

ISLAMIC STATE

The Islamic State Claims to Have Hostages From China and Norway 'For Sale'
By Reuters and VICE News

September 9, 2015 | 2:40 pm
The so-called Islamic State (IS) claims to have captured two hostages from Norway and China, and the militant group is soliciting ransom payments for the men in the latest issue of its English-language propaganda magazine.

IS identified the men as Ole Johan Grimsgaard-Ofstad, 48-year-old from Oslo, and Fan Jinghui, a 50-year-old from Beijing.

Full-page, advertisement-style listings in the group's Dabiq magazine show pictures of both men and say they are "for sale." The images list a "telegram number" for "whoever would like to pay the ransom for his release and transfer."

Related: Islamic State Claims to Mint Gold Coins in Effort to Drive US to Financial Ruin

This image has been edited to remove some identifying details and other information.

Telegram may refer to the secure messaging app that lets users instantly message friends or strangers without necessarily knowing their number.

The militants provided no details about when or where the hostages were captured.

Fan's listing in Dabiq describes him as a "freelance consultant."

On January 18, Grimsgaard-Ofstad posted a photo on his Facebook account that appeared to show him in Turkey near the Syrian border. Six days later, the Norwegian posted another update saying he had reached the northwestern Syrian province of Idlib. "I finally made it," he wrote.

Related: Has One Year of Bombing the Islamic State Made a Difference?

This image has been edited to remove some identifying details and other information.

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg confirmed on Wednesday that one of the country's citizens had been taken hostage in Syria.

"Our goal is to get our citizen home," she said at a news conference. "Let me be very clear — this is a very demanding case."

She did not identify the hostage by name, but said he was in his 40s and had been held by several groups since he was first captured.

"The government is taking this very seriously," she said. "We cannot and will not give in to pressure from terrorists and criminals. Norway does not pay ransoms. That is a principle we cannot give up in meetings with cynical terrorists."

A ransom payment would increase the risk of other Norwegian citizens being kidnapped, she said.

Solberg declined to take questions from the media at the news conference, and withdrew from a televised party debate in the run-up to local elections that are scheduled for Monday.

A Norwegian government crisis group is working on the hostage case, the prime minister said.

Follow VICE News on Twitter: @vicenews

TOPICS: islamic state, hostages, norway, china, norwegian, chinese, middle east, syria, war & conflict, isis, isil, is, ransom, ole johan grimsgaard-ofstad, telegram messenger, fan jinghui, dabiq, islamic state propaganda

Friday, August 7, 2015

Safer America Passes The School Protection Test Once Again

Earlier this year the security consultants at RyPul Threat Assessments were asked by the owners at Safer America, a Huntington Beach California that specializes in supplying bullet resistant building protection products, to schools, businesses, homes, hospitals, casino's and banks, to put each of their three highly rated, and much talked about bullet resistant protection products to the test. 

Safer America offers a revolutionary door protection device called the door shield, a wireless remote door locking system as well as a bullet and fire resistant window laminate that helps protect against small arms fire, burglaries, school shootings and theft. Safer America currently has products protection schools and businesses around the country. The RyPul Threat Assessment team was chosen for the testing due to its international reputation as experts in the field of personal, diplomatic, and residential defense training as well as in close personal protection. 

The owner of RyPul Threat Assessments Warren Pulley stated that " after seeing the Safer America products on a local television station, my consultants and I conducted a series of weapons test to the bullet resistant door shield and window protection offered by Safer America, we also attempted to burn the products, to find out if they held up to the claims made by the Safer America company. After conducting days long small arms fire testing, I can say unequivocally, that these products as advertised by Safer America really took a beating, but stood up to the test and did not fail, even after we fired hundreds of rounds into them from as close and three feet away. 

I was impressed by the simplicity at which these products are designed and how easily they can be implemented into any structure. I would highly recommend any school, home owner, hospital, bank or business looking for some really great bullet, theft and fire resistant products to give the people at Safer America a call today". Pulley also stated that “we have tested dozens of school, residential and commercial building safety devices around the world, and we have yet to see a series of products perform as well as the products offered by Safer America. If you are looking for a complete building protection system that guards against shootings, break-ins, burglaries, thefts and civil disturbances, then we highly recommend the products offered by Safer America." 

Safer America can be located at www.saferamerica.net. 

Radio journalist critical of government killed during live broadcast in Brazil


A well-known radio journalist in Brazil who repeatedly denounced political corruption was gunned down Thursday in the middle of one of his broadcasts.

Gleydson Carvalho was a dogged journalist who had received death threats on Facebook.

Carvalho, police said, was in the middle of his broadcast in Camocim, in the state of Ceará, when two men showed up at the building to buy advertising space, according to the show’s technical operator, Ricardo Farias.

The ad inquiry, police say, was a ruse. Once the men were allowed into the building, one of them forced his way into the Carvalho’s booth and ambushed him.

"The guy opened the door and shot three times. It was very quick. I saw the bloody body and asked for help right away," Farias told reporters. “Gleydson had received threats saying they would kill him and he said on the air that he was threatened and he was not afraid… I always told him not to do it.”

Carvalho was a known critic of the local government and usually talked politics on his show at Radio Liberdade FM.

"Today was silenced one of the most important voices of our region, in a tragic and unnecessary manner," the municipality of Camocim said in a statement posted on its website.

Carvalho’s lawyer, Marcos Coelho, said he never imagined something like this could happen in their town. “This is a crime that deserves the most rigorous investigation possible by the authorities,” he said, as quoted by Mirror.

The Committee to Protect Journalists said this is the third journalist killed in Brazil this year in direct relation to their work. At least 16 journalists have been killed for their work since 2011, the group said.

"Violence against the press in Brazil had already reached unacceptable levels. Now we are stunned by the brazen murder of Gleydson Carvalho in the middle of his radio show," said Sara Rafsky, CPJ's Americas research associate. "Authorities must take action to combat a press freedom crisis that is violating the right of all Brazilians to be informed, not to mention ending journalists' lives."

Kabul blasts kill 35, test Afghan president's peace plan

Kabul blast.jpg
August 7, 2015 - An Afghan policeman at the site of a truck bomb attack in Kabul, Afghanistan. The truck bomb exploded near an army compound in the center of the Afghan capital, killing at least 15 and wounding hundreds police and health ministry officials said. (REUTERS)
Two massive attacks in Kabul on Friday, one near a government and military complex in a residential area and the other a suicide bombing outside a police academy, killed at least 35 people, sending the strongest message yet to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani -- that militants are still able to strike at his heavily fortified seat of power.
No one claimed responsibility for the attacks, though officials indicated they blamed the Taliban.
The implications of the assaults, however, undermine claims by security services and the government that the capital is immune from devastating attacks. They also pose a major challenge to Ghani, who has made the peace process with the Taliban the hallmark of his presidency since taking office last year.
In the evening hours, a suicide bomber dressed in a police uniform struck outside the gates of a police academy in Kabul, killing at least 20 recruits and wounding 24, Afghan officials said.
The attacker walked into a group of recruits waiting outside the academy and detonated his explosives-laden vest, said a police officer, who goes by the name of Mabubullah. Many Afghans use only one name. A security official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to reporters, said there were at least 24 wounded among the recruits.
Later on Friday evening, insurgents launched an attack on a NATO military base near Kabul's international airport, according to the coalition spokesman, Col. Brian Tribus. Two insurgents were killed in the assault, he added, without giving further details.
No one claimed responsibility for that attack and it was not immediately clear if there was any damage to the NATO base.
Earlier in the day, a massive truck bomb killed at least 15 people in a residential area of Kabul. That 1 a.m. blast flattened an entire city block and also wounded 240 people, officials said.
It was one of the largest ever in Kabul -- a city of 4.5 million people -- in terms of scale, flattening a city block and leaving a 30-foot crater in the ground.
The president's office said 47 women and 33 children were among the casualties in that attack. The president's deputy spokesman, Zafar Hashemi, said about 40 of the wounded would remain hospitalized. It was unknown how the attackers smuggled a large amount of explosives into the heavily guarded city.
Ghani threatened a rapid and forceful response to the bombing, saying it was aimed at diverting public attention from the Taliban's leadership struggle.
Last week, Afghan authorities announced the death Mullah Mohammad Omar, the one-eyed, secretive head of the Taliban who hosted Osama Bin Laden's al-Qaida in the years leading up to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Mullah Omar had not been seen in public since fleeing over the border into Pakistan after the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban.
The Afghan intelligence agency said Mullah Omar had been dead for more than two years. The Taliban leadership confirmed his death -- and even appointed a successor -- but the revelation still sparked a leadership struggle among senior Taliban figures, raising concerns of a succession crisis that could splinter the group.
Pakistan, which wields significant influence over the insurgent group and which hosted the first round of landmark Afghan-Taliban peace talks last month, denied that Mullah Omar had died in Karachi. Pakistan's defense minister, Khawaja Muhammad Asif, repeated that denial in parliament on Friday.
The peace talks were indefinitely postponed following the announcement of Mullah Omar's death.
Ghani, freshly returned from medical treatment in Germany, visited the wounded from the early Friday attack in hospital as social media carried calls for blood donations
"We are still committed to peace. But we will respond to these sort of terrorist attacks with force and power," Ghani said in a statement, condemning the high civilian casualty count.
Zafar Hashemi, the president's deputy spokesman, blamed the Taliban and said the attackers aimed to "hide the cracks between their own factions and create terror."
At a White House briefing Friday, press secretary Josh Earnest said the U.S. "condemns in the strongest terms" the bombing in Kabul.
"This heinous attack demonstrates once again the ever-growing gulf between extremists and the people of Afghanistan and it certainly shows the blatant disregard for human life on the part of those extremists," Earnest said, adding that the Afghan people have endured much but remain resilient "even in the face of a brutal insurgency."
The Obama administration continues to urge the Taliban to heed Ghani's call for reconciliation and make peace with the government, Earnest also said.
The appointment of Mullah Omar's deputy, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, to succeed him sparked protests from his brother and son, and appears to have led to serious rifts that internal committees are now trying to heal.
An Afghan security official -- speaking on condition of anonymity as he was not authorized to give information to the media -- said the Taliban had split into four factions, all with powerful political credentials and substantial armed followings.
He said that agents of Pakistan's ISI intelligence agency -- believed to have sheltered the Taliban leadership since their regime was overthrown in a U.S.-led invasion in 2001 --  were in Quetta to help the Taliban resolve the crisis.
Mullah Akhtar is believed to have led the group into informal and formal peace talks at the behest of Islamabad. Other contenders for the leadership might not be so open to a dialogue with the Afghan government, possibly believing that apparent success on the battlefield this year puts victory within sight.
"The peace talks are on ice for the moment until the Taliban can come up with a coherent political voice," said Graeme Smith, Afghanistan analyst with the International Crisis Group.
"The Afghan government has no choice but to wait for the leadership crisis to be resolved. There is no one to talk to right now. Peace negotiators need someone to talk to," he said.

The First 3D-Printed Drug Has Been Approved in the US

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a drug made by 3D printing for the first time, according to American pharma company Aprecia.
The company announced on Monday that the FDA had approved its drug Spritam, a branded version of the generic levetiracetam, as an oral treatment to help treat seizures in patients with epilepsy.
Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant that’s been available to treat epilepsy in the US and UK for years, but Aprecia claims that its proprietary 3D-printed formulation disintegrates rapidly (in less than 10 seconds for a high-dose drug) and could offer more taste-masking possibilities.
The company explains that its “ZipDose” technology works by printing together layers of powder with a fluid to make a “porous, water-soluble matrix that rapidly disintegrates with a sip of liquid.” Using this 3D printing method sets the product apart from conventional pills that are compressed or moulded into shape.
So while the medication itself has the same effect, it’s intended to improve the experience of taking it by literally making it easier to swallow: the company claims that even the strongest doses of the drug could be taken with just a sip of water.
In its announcement, Aprecia wrote that, “While 3DP [3D printing] has been used previously to manufacture medical devices, this approval marks the first time a drug product manufactured with this technology has been approved by the FDA.”
3D printing techniques have been put to use across medical research to create surgical guidesimplants, and even human tissue. And while Aprecia is still delivered in its finished form as a prescription tablet, many hail the potential of 3D printing to allow for greater personalisation of medicines. Perhaps one day they’ll even come as print-at-home downloads.